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Alleged Lukewarmness of Welshi…

j Public Demonstration.

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Public Demonstration. BIS OF ST. DAVID S IMPUGNED. A public meeting was held in the evening at Zion Chapel, Mr. Llewelyn Williams, M P., presiding. The Chairman, in his introductory remarks, said that if they were going to win Disestab- lishment, the credit was chiefly due to their conductor, Mr. Lloyd George (applause), and if he were to turn against them it would be too late for them to obtain the severance of the Church from the State: but he did not be- lieve for a moment that Mr. Lloyd George would turn against the claim of Wales (ap- plause). He asked them to harmonize and work in unity: then, ere long, they would leap the benefit of their toil (applause). Mr. Timothy Davies, M.P., said that when the Disestablishment Bill came before the House of Commons he believed Mr. Llewelyn Williams won id do best for securing the severance of the- Church from the State. He had heard Mr. Williams speak, and his heart was always towards Wales. He wished to propose a resolution that that meeting adopt and approve of the resolutions passed at the afternoon conference. They had heard a great deal during the 1>1, few days with re- gard to the Disestablishruent of the Church in Wales What was the Bishop of. at David's anxious to prove? He v-id stated in the Church House and a" ( < x iti jn, in Lon- don, that the Nunconfunni"t:; of Wales were not half the population. Ir he were a Welsh u?mbei..or li\ea in the diocese of St David's, he would make, the Bishop prove the mis- leading figures he had given at Convocation, and ask him what he meant by putting them forward. He also sa. forward. He also ;'l that the Church of England was nlimerie:1", stronger than any single Noncont â del: ruination. That was not a true st nent. According to the st.atement of the Prime Minister, two of the three denominations in Wales were stronger than the Church of England. Although lie was not familiar with the figures in regard to the Baptist Church, he could say that they had n. far greater influence with the workers of Wales than the Church of England. He did not know where the Bishop of St David's had his figures fromâpossibly, the last cen- sus, which included lunatics, the inmates of workhouses, and those in the public-houses: all these belonged to the Church of England (laughter and applause). Mr. Clement Edwards, M.P., said the ques- tion of Disestablishment, as far as Wales was concerned, was past argument, and the only thing that concerned them was, what was going to happen to the measure this session ? The broad principles they were agreed upon, and they said that religion was a matter be- tween the man personally and his God. It was not for the State to teach religion. There must not be denominational tests for any class of civil servants, whether they were teachers or whether they occupied any other position Then it s politically hurtful and socially destm t ind unjust that one par- ticular sect should be put in a position of privilege (applause), and the tenets of that sect be taught at the expense of the whole community. They were going for the Disen- dowmaat of the Church so far as. the tithes were concerned. In the House of Commons recently, Mr. Balfour had the impudence (ap- plause) to go against the whole range of ec- clesiastical authority, and the whole range of our authoritative mothers, to assert that the tithes were in the. nature of voluntary offer- ings, and not in the nature of taxes. Wales had stated the question by returning thirty- ¡ four members (applause). From 1838 they had had great men in the movement supporting this question, including Richard Dilhvyn, Thomas Gee, Sir Osborn Morgan, and others. It was now being whispered that they were- to I stand aside for the Budget. He thought it was the most magnificent Budget that had ever been produced (applause), but he objec- red entirely, as one individual in the Welsh. Party, to have, it put upon him that he must either abandon Disestablishment or sacrifice i the Budget. It was not necessary (apphuse). The longer the session would be extended by the Budget, the greater the chances for Disss- tablishment. He would tell them why. A great measure like the Budget could not he I taken on more than three Parliamentary days a week. The further it was extended, there- fore, the larger number of weeks from which they were to nnd spate day" which may be devoted to other measures, and it was the duty of the Welsh Party to see that some of t hose spare days wore found for Disestablish-" ment (applause) They wen iold to trust the Government He agreed (h,1r, Iiaar), and ?'hey would Imep their pow der dry (loud ap- plause). The Irish Party were in one solid compact body, speaking with one voice. The Scotch members acted in the same way. Lon- don moved andVmdou clamoured for great reforms, and they had them. The Labour Party moved as a solid body, and pressed their claims forward. Now, then, it was the. duty of the Welsh Party on this question to move exactly in the same way (applause). He believed that if the Welsh Party would do their dutv this session, then ihe. Government '.vr-.i d d Ii nr] the. r. r tiro'' n nass the u'/it 1 rea d '1 fhe r-orn- sf.-re. ;;ud f'o nvort .^ge. and e-ond it to the House of Lords. They were .told that I the Lords would reject it. It was an extra- ordinary thing how suddenly people seemed to understand the minds of the Lords (laugh- ter and applause). Why were the Lords now more certain to reject the Bill than they were I in 1895? How more certain were the Lords to reject the Bill than the Plural Voting Bill and the Land Values Bill? It was not for them to trouble what the House of Lords would do until they did it (applause). They heard that the great predominant question at the, next election would be the veto of the House of Lords If the Bill came before the House of Lords, and if they rejected it, in- stead of being against the Liberal Party, who are now redeeming their pledge to Wales, the fight would be in Wales and other parts of England against the House of Lords (hear, hear). They had watched for forty years for the achievement of this great measure of reo I ligious equality, and they said that if they were not to be the laughing stock of other parts of the communityâwith an unpreceden- ted Liberal majorityâthey were to assert themselves in this fight (applause). The Rev. Penar Griffiths, Mr.' Edward Powell, Aberdovey, and Mr. Edgar Jones, M.A., also addressed the meeting. j )

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