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DOMESTIC TRAGEDIES. I

DEATH OF A DEVOTED WOMAN.…

ILATEST IN YACHTS. I

COUNTESS'S ROMANCE.J

STRUGGLE WITH A PANTHER. I

I TO FIGHT DISEASE.

HARNESSING THE SUN.

.FRENCH AND ENGLISH WOMEN.

MARK TWAIN AND CHRISTIAN SCIENCE.

OUR LONDON LETTER.

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OUR LONDON LETTER. (From Our London Correspondent.) Princess Victoria is said to have benefited immensely in health by her stay in Norway with her brother-in-law and sister, King Haakon and Queen Maud. She lived as much a^poisibJe out of doors there, as she generally does, indeed, at Sandringham for an outdoor life is supposed to be the best treatment for the sort of nervous headaches from which the Princess has now suffered for a good many years. Her Royal Highness's health began to be unsatisfactory about ten years ago, from the results of a severe attack of influenza. And her illness last year, when she was operated upon for appendicitis, left her naturally still more delicate than she had been before. Princess Louise, Duchess of Argyll, is to join her sister, Princess Henry of Battenberg, in the South of Europe, during the spring. Princess Henry, after leaving Spain, will pay one or two visits to her friends before coming North; and her home route will embrace Biarritz, where she will meet the Princess Frederica of Hanover, and Cap Martin, where the Empress Eugenie, with whom she is a great favourite, will receive her. The Prin- cess Louise is expected to join both these parties. No definite arrangements, however, have yet been made, as all plans depend upon the course of events in Madrid. The news of the marriage of Lady Stanley, widow of Sir Henry M. Stanley, the cele- brated explorer, came as a surprise to the general public, for no intimation had been given of the event, and the news was kept quiet for a day or two afterwards. The bride- groom, Mr. Henry Curtis, F.R.C.S., is a phy- sician in Harley-street, and the wedding was very quietly celebrated at All Souls, Lang- ham-place, by the Rev. F. S. Webster, only a very few persons being present. There was a great contrast between this ceremony and Lady Stanley's marriage to the great African explorer. Mr. Gladstone and a host of celebrities were present in Westminster Abbey, and the list of wedding presents was remarkable. In the later years of his life Sir Henry and Lady Stanley adopted a little boy, just as the explorer himself had been adopted in his own early boyhood. This lad, Denzil Stanley, will inherit in due course part of the substantial fortune left by Sir Henry. Two Victoria Cross heroes, who are also brothers, major-generals, C.M.G.'s, and clever painters, are exhibiting pictures at. the Naval and Military Art Exhibition at the Bruton Galleries. These two, Major-Generals E. H. and R. W. Sartorius, are sons of the late Admiral of the Fleet Sir George Rose Sar- torious, and singularly enough they both exhibit pictures of Swiss .scenery. Major- General E. H. Sartorius won his V.C. in the Afghan war; while his brother gained his in the Ashanti campaign. They have another brother, Colonel George Sartorius, C.B., a hunter of big game, who shot the biggest bison ever bagged. An A.B. seaman, Harold White- bead, a naval pensioner, is exhibiting some clever paintings of British battleships, and Major-General R. S. Baden-Powell, the hero of Mafeking, who is an accomplished artist, sends several paintings. Mr. W. T. Stead, who was accompanied by Mrs. Stead, has sailed for America, where lie will attend the inauguration of the Pittsburg Technical Institute, which he describes as one of the greatest benefactions Mr. Carnegie has conferred upon his "partners," the people of Pittsburg, and also the Peace Convention in New York. He proposes to "take soundings in influential quarters as to the wishes of Americans and their Government concerning the forthcoming Hague Conference." He flopes that America. will move to make com- pulsory the principle of arbitration in inter- national disputes before permitting recourse to war, a principle which America got unani- mously approved as a recommendation of tho Hague Convention of 1899. He does not ex- pect the armament question to have anything more than an educational result this year; but he hopes to see the British Empire and the United States acting as before in unity. Among Mr. Stead's fellow-passengers were Sir W. H. Preece and Mr. Maarfcen Maartens, the Dutch novelist, who are also attending the Pittsburg Institute inauguration. n Lent being over, the usual rush of marriages has commenced, and West-end churches will have a very busy time of it up to the end of April. Although, judging from the announce- ments in the papers, more ceremonies than usual took place during Lent, there have been few really smart functions, but now many of these have to be crowded in before May sets in, for the merrie month is still held to be unlucky for marriages. The dressmakers are all hard at work on the bridal and brides- maids' dresses, and now that it is the fashion to have from ten to twelve bridesmaids, with two little trainbearers or pages, the costumiers will have their hands quite full. For Thurs- day, April 11, there are no fewer than twenty- one weddings, among them being those of Viscount Cole, eldest son of the Earl of Ennis- Irillen, and Miss Irene Miller Mundy, at St. Margaret's, Westminster, and Captain God- frey Faussett, Equerry to the Prince of Wales, and Miss Eugenie Dudley Ward, at the Chapel Royal, St. James's. The Prince and Princcss of Wales attend the latter ceremony, and their Royal Highnesses will also be present at St. George's, Hanover-square, on the 25tli, when the Hon. Dudley Gordon, second son of the Earl and Countess of Aberdeen, marries Miss Cecile Drummond. The welcome which the City of London will give the Colonial Premiers will be a. particu- larly warm one. The feature of tlie day will 'be the presentation of the Freedom to Sir Wilfrid Laurier, Mr. Deakin, Sir Joseph "Ward, Dr. Jameson, General Botha, Mr. "Moor and Sir R. Bond, and thus at one fell swoop the City will double its number of honorary freemen, the half-dozen st'dl living being Royal personages, great statesmen or great military leaders. The addresses 01 wel- come will be exquisite works of art., and the caskets to contain them, beautiful examples of the goldsmith's art, will be of solid gold. The casket itself is in the form of a hoi low golden sphere, upon which is traced the map of the world, with special regard to the British Empire. The presentation will be followed by a Guildhall lunch, at which many distinguished guests will be present, and after this there is to be a conversazione in the art gallery, library, and council chamber of the Guildhall. The streets of the City are to be decorated as lavishly as for a Royal visit, and special efforts are to be made to give the adornments special significance, thE> arms and products of the Colonies forming the basis 01 caamy designs. S. J.

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MUTINY IN A LONDON GAOL. .

BIG INSURANCE FIGURES. I

STANDARDIZING THE SAUSAGE.…

A HAUNTED NECKLACE.I

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I MAID AND MASSEUR.

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THE SINS OF SOCIETY.

AN IMPERIAL OFFICE.

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