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DOMESTIC TRAGEDIES. I

DEATH OF A DEVOTED WOMAN.…

ILATEST IN YACHTS. I

COUNTESS'S ROMANCE.J

STRUGGLE WITH A PANTHER. I

I TO FIGHT DISEASE.

HARNESSING THE SUN.

.FRENCH AND ENGLISH WOMEN.

MARK TWAIN AND CHRISTIAN SCIENCE.

OUR LONDON LETTER.

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MUTINY IN A LONDON GAOL. .

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MUTINY IN A LONDON GAOL. Wormwood Scrubbs Gaol has during the last few days been the scene of some sensa- tional incidents. For some time the spirit of mischief seems to have held sway (says the "Morning Leader"), and at length to have broken out into rebellion. One evening a convict, working as a shoemaker on the fourth floor, was temporarily let out of his cell. Breaking away from the warder, he ran along the corridor, and, seizing a chain which worked the ventilating apparatus, he climbed up it like a monkey. Having hidden under his clothes a shoemaker's hammer, he used this to smash the fixed glass skylight that gave him access to free air. The noise of the falling glass brought up relays of warders, but they were held at bay. If they moved to capture him the convict stopped their progress with a well-aimed piece of glass. Having exhausted this, he hammered the tiles into pieces, and used these as ammunition. This went on until everything that was within his reach being expended, he quietly surrendered. On Sunday morning from 100 to '120 pri- soners were patrolling the exercise yard under the supervision of four warders only. Suddenly the shoemaker-convict stepped from the file and threw his cap into the air. Then he assumed an impudent attitude of defiance. Inspired by this, the other convicts broke out into open insubordination, and be- came menacing. The officers sounded their whistles, and other warders rushing upon the scene, singled out the ringleaders, and seiz- ing them dragged them into the gaol, where they were locked in their cells. Later the same morning another convict ran wild. He had been transferred from an- other gaol, and was classified as a "danger- ous" man. Making a dash for a waste-pipe that ran up the building, he quickly mounted this until he was some 30ft. from the ground. There he remained. A well-directed stream of water from a fire hose, however, brought him down pretty quickly. The other convicts became abso- lutely ungovernable, and in the end the governor had to resort to severe measures. By his orders two men were placed in irons, pending the visiting justices' award of the punishment they merited, and others were ordered three days' confinement in their cells, with a diet of bread and water. Much of the trouble is, it is stated, dis- tinctly traceable to the fact that the prison is understaffed, as may be gathered by the statement that with a thousand convicts at- tending the chapel the guard only consists of 21 warders.

BIG INSURANCE FIGURES. I

STANDARDIZING THE SAUSAGE.…

A HAUNTED NECKLACE.I

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I MAID AND MASSEUR.

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THE SINS OF SOCIETY.

AN IMPERIAL OFFICE.

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