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7 [ QUEEN AND UNEMPLOYJ&D.

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"WHEN I AM DEAD." I

CHILDREN'S COUGHS.I

- THE ROYAL TOUR. I

!" ROUND-THE-WORLD " TOUR.I

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TURBULENT RUSSIA.

PELTING A PRINCE.

SEAWEED IN KIDNEY DISEASES

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IMISS DOUGrBTY INSANE.

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I MISS DOUGrBTY INSANE. t. BROTHER ON OUR PRISON SYSTEM. Miss Florence Doughty, who was sentenced to aeven yeajs' impriaonment for shooting at a.nd wounding & solicitor named Mr. Swann, with whom she bad been on friendly terms, and htd son at the junction of South Moulton-street and Oxford-street on April 28 last, has been removed from pri&on to the Broadmoor Lunatic Asylum. After her 'arrest she endeavoured to commit suicide by poisoning herself in the cab which conveyed her to the police-station, and when the sentemoe was pronounced' at the triaJ she exclaimed! in court. "You may take my life, but you will never kill my spirit." The mewa of her mental breakdown vrils con- veyed: to the Home Office in the following letter to Messrs. Matthews and Co., solicitors, who acted for her, in reply to a petition pre- sented by them for a remission of the sentence, which was consid&ced extremely severe :â "Whitehall, November 11, 1905. "Gentlemen,-With reference to your applica- tions on behalf of Florence Doughty, I .am directed by the Secretary of State to inform you that this prisoner lias b'e&n for some time under medical observation on account of the symptoms she displayed of mental unsoundnass, and that she has now been certified insane under the Criminal Lunatics Act, 1884, and will be removed to Broadmoor Asylum, where sh.a will receive the special treatment aud attention which her maJady requires.âI am, gentlemen, your obedient servant, "C. E. TROUP." Mr. Ronald Doughty, brother of the young womaJi, in an interview on Monday, said: "I saw my sister at Aylesbury just after the con- viction, and I thought her condition at that time such that she would very shortly become insane. I 'voiced my idea in the public Press, but it seems to have availed little. Since my visit no one has been allowed to see her or to write to her. I wrote several letters,. in which I asked whether it was possible to gft permis- sion to write to her or to see her, and I was told that when I should be allowed to write to her I should receive, a letter or printed form. That maladministration of British justice which cuts a prisoner off from friends and kinsfolk is a. grievance crying out to common sense and humanity for redress. I am quite sure that, had I been allowed to see her, I could hava nlied her with hope, and so have saved her intellect."

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