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* -I MR. ARNOLD-FOHSTER AT…

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ENGLISH AH THE JAP SPEAKS…

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I ITHE WAR

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I ITHE WAR 1 â I FIGHT IN A SNOWSTORM. A despatch from Chabsiamatun under Satur. {. day's date states that the Japanese took the offensive against the eastern Russian positions on November 24, but were repulsed. At eleven o'clock on Friday morning of last week the Japanese began operations with one brigade of infantry and twelve guns against the Russian central position, but soon after noon the attack ¡ was repulsed, the Russian artillery succeeding in silencing the Japanese guns. At four in the afternoon a heavy snowstorm came on, accom- j panied by fog, and under cover of this the I jJ^Panese again attacked along the whole front, j The fighting lasted three hours, the Japanese j eventually retiring. PRINCESS'S PLUCKY ESCAPE. telegram to the "Echo da Paris" states that the Princess Lievin, whose husband com- manded the Diana, which took refuge at Saigon after the sortie of August 10, has succeeded in manded the Diana, which took refuge at Saigon after the sortie of August 10, has succeeded in making her escape from Port Arthur on board a Chinese junk. The Princess, it appears, besought her husband to allow her to accom- pany him on board the Diana on the occasion of the sortie, but he refused to permit her to I run so terrible a risk. I JAPAN WILL FIGHT TO TTTTn. T.AST General Kuropatkin reports that intermittent artillery fire, is kept up along the whole front of the Manchurian armies, and Marshal Oyama describes various small encounters which have taken place, one of them on the right bank of ⢠rjver- An unofficial telegram received m loki o states that the Russian outposts on the I bna-ho are within 200 metres of the Japanese. vT ft.Vers -W1^ soon ke sufficiently frozen to bear the weight of heavy transport. An official telegram received in Tokio from Port Arthur says that the Japanese approaches to Sung-shu- shan -and the eastward forts having been almost completed, a strong attack was begun on Satur- day night, but, owing to the enemy's stubborn resistance, the object of the assault is still unattamed. Fighting continues. A further telegram states that a picked body of Japanese swordsmen has attacked the Russian forts. In St. Petersburg, on Saturday, the case of the seizure of the British steamer Cheltenham, captured by the Vladivostok fleet in July last, came before the Supreme Naval Prize Court, which upheld the seizure of the ship. Accord- ing to a foreigner who has arrived at Nagasaki from Vladivostok, the Russian cruiser Bogatyr is unserviceable and is supported by pontoons. The Gromoboi has twenty-five frames broken, and is badly strained, and the repairs will take some months. A Tokio correspondent reports an interview with Count Katsura, the Japanese Premier, who declared that Japan was pre- pared to sacrifice the last man and the last yen in the war. A SERIES OF SKIRMISHES. I An official cablegram announces that a deter- mined attack upon Port Arthur was begun on Saturday. Fighting still continues without cessation, the besiegers having apparently resolved upon the falt of the fortress before the arrival of the Baltic Fleet. One account of the attack, which was signalised by desperate hand-to-hand fighting, estimates the Japanese losses at 7,000. The fighting in Manchuria has resolved itself into a series of skirmishes, in which both sides appear to gain slight advantages alternately. The cold is being felt very keenly by both armies, and on one terrible night five of Kuroki's sentries were frozen to death. The advent of winter has caused a remarkable congestion in the town of Mukden. Accom- modation for the officials is difficult to obtain, and the trouble is increased by the Chinese from the neighbouring villages, who are flocking into the town. 0 Detachments of fresh troops continue to arrive daily at Mukden, while many men wounded in the Sha-ho battle have been dis- charged, from hospital at Harbin, and have returned to the front. An article which appears in the St. Peters- burg "Invalid" estimates the strength of General Kuropatkin's army at 600,000 men. OFFERING LARGE SUMS FOR ENGLISH 1 SHIPS. I The purchase of the torpedo-destroyer Caroline, and the adventurous voyage of that vessel from London to Libau, proves to be the result of a system organised by Russia for the purchase of ships and stores in Great Britain. According to a Liverpool correspondent, a French commercial firm, inquiring whether a gunboat just being completed at Birkenhead for the Peruvian Government was purchasable, negotiations were opened, and an agent arrived at Liverpool shortly afterwards. He proved to be a Russian gentleman of military bearing, who spoke most European languages perfectly, and added to a sound com- mercial acumen an expert knowledge of vessels of war. Inquiries show that this gentleman had control of an unlimited supply of money. He moved from place to place in a motor-car of very high power, and, for longer journeys, on more than one occasion chartered a special train. In some of his dealings he represented him- self as acting for an American millionaire, who wished to acquire very fast motors and yachts. This agent, whilst in Liverpool, made over- tures for the purchase of one or two swift liners, and actually entered into preliminary arrange- ments with a shipping company of world-wido fame. Both transactions, however, subsequently fell through on the question of price and delivery, and the agent left for the Tyne, where he inspected other warships nearing completion, and then travelled to London, where apparently he found what he wanted. At the same time, through a firm came an offer to the same Liverpool broker of £5 a ton for 7,000 tons of steam coal for Vladivostok. A well-known Liverpool shipping company accepted the offer, but the rate was reduced to £ 3 per ton, presumably on receipt of other offers. The business was then declined as being "too risky." BALTIC FLEET. The supplementary squadron of the Baltic Fleet, which anchored, off Dover on Sunday night, weighed anchor early on Monday morn- ing and steamed: away. The fog prevented any- thing being seen from the shore, but fishermen report that during the night the vessels were engaged in coaling about four miles from the shore. The Dover authorities have evidently taken the Dogger Bank incident to heart, as the request of a. journalist who wished to engage a tug to take him out to the fleet was refused. The reason advanced by the harbour authorities was the danger of the tug being fired on by the Russians if she proceeded to close quarters in the fog. SHARP FIGHTING ON THE SHAHO. A despatch from General Kuropatkin of Mon- day's date says:â"The engagement near Tsin- khe-chon was resumed to-day, but ceased at eleven o'clock in the morning. We collected the Japanese dead with the object of burying them near the position occupied by us. By midday we had found 230 bodies, all of men of the Seventh Reserve Regiment of the Ninth Re- serve Brigade. We took a large quantity of rifles, ammunition, and entrenching tools. We have received no further report regarding to- day's events." General Sakharoff telegraphed to St. Peters- burg on Tuesday as follows: -"Yesterday after- noon the enemy's troops, having attacked the position at Tsin-khe-chon, began slowly to re- treat. Advanced posts of our troops sent in pursuit of the enemy were received with a fusil- lade from an unnamed village situated four kilo- metres from our position; but our cannonade forced the enemy to abandon the village. "The night of November 28th passed quietly." PROGRESS AT PORT ARTHUR. I The Japanese Legation in London on Tuesday I night issued the following despatch :â "The following telegram, dated Tokio, 29th November, has been received at the Japanese" Legation: â '"Port Arthur besieging army's report, dated November 29tli j Against the enemy's line of entrenchments, f extending from Sungshushan eastwards, the army succeeded in firmly occupying the top of | the counterscrap and neighbourhood, and is now destroying casemates and caponnieres. I Against 203 Metre Hill the army succeeded in occupying the enemy's trenches near the top after several assaults.*

INEEDED NEW BLOOD. I

A HYPOCRITE'S FRAUDS. I

THE KING. I

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lOUR ROYAL VISITORS.

COUGHS AND BRONCHITIS.

I RUSSIA AND BRITAIN.I

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EATJL AND LADIES' CHURCH "…

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