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I THE UNEMPLOYED.

I THE AMERICAN ELECTION. I

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IBirth of an Heir.I

[No title]

STBANQB SIBERIAN CUSTOMS.I

THE DAHLIA. I

..-...-Usfes Of PÀTI I

THE ENGLISH POSTAL SYSTEM.

CHASED BY HUNGRY WOLVES.

inomliltilloyi of Sheriffs.…

Visit of the Sing and Queen…

i ! A Japanese Attack Repulsed.…

IThe Russian Outrage.

Tragic Death of a Bachelor…

COMPULSORY SILENCB. I

Important Action by the Monmouthshire…

Fnglnnd and Russia.

I Another Arbitration Treaty.…

The Far East. i

! Everything Quiet at theI…

A Disastrous fire at Boston.

I Barcelona Bomb Outrage.,

I kiiig Carlos Shooting.

Attempted Double Murder and.…

I Stocks.

ling Edward, the Peacemaker.

- The Gleaner.

ECLIPSES OF THE MooN.I

I THE FALL OF PORT ARTHUR-

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RUSSIAN REWARDS OFFERED,

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IDISEASES SPREAD BY VAGRANTS.I

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I DISEASES SPREAD BY VAGRANTS. I At a conference of public authorities held in London, attention was drawn to the ve important subject of the spread of infectious disease by vagrauts. When the persons visit a casual ward they receive a bath. and their clothes are placed in a disinfecting chamber, and, by the operation of Mr Hazell's Cleansing of Persons' Act, the same facilities are extended to tramps and others who seek them without compulsion to do a task of work. That is very much to the good, but there are many people who have no repugnance to dirt, and do not visit a casual ward if they can possibly help it. In the summer they sleep in the open air, and in the winter they resort to the cheap doss houses." It is obvious that such persons are a public danger seeing that they spread smallpox or other infectious disease in all directions. Perhaps to a less extent, but still very appreciably, a like danger is presented by the men and women who go with their families to the hop fields. After living in conditions which are not always of the most sanitary description, they return home in ordinary railway trains. When they alight, other people get into the same carriage, with the result that infec- tious disease is often communicated to pas- sengers, who are quite unable to understand how it can have been contracted- The public authorities will have some difficulty in discovering satisfactory remedies for these evils, but there are certainly some precautions which it is practicable to en- force. and it is well that attention should have been drawn thus publicly to the subject.

IDavid Shepherd's Affairs.…