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FIELD AND FARM. 1 .-I

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| GARDEN GOSSIP. I

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OUR SHORT STORY.I

HAMLET'S GRAVE. I

MYSTERIOUS AFFAIR AT I ALDER8HOT.

CABINETS DUIUN G KECESS. ■

PROSPEROUS FARM LABOURERS.…

CANNIBAL COMMONS. I

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CANNIBAL COMMONS. MR. WINSTON CHURCHILL ON THE DECADENCE OF FREE SPEECH. The principal difference between the civilised man and the cannibal, said Mr. Winston Churchill at Coatbridge, on Friday of last week, is the willingness of the former to hear the other side. Mr. Churchill was opening a new Liberal club, and he made no secret of his belief that as regarded free speech the House of Commons had lately adopted the attitude of the cannibal. One of the cardinal principles of Liberalism, as h understood it, was the tolera- tion of opinions which they detested. Clues were useful, through the exercise of free speech, for the dissipation of delusions, of which many were going about just now. A distinguished statesman, who came to Glasgow thirteen months ago, brought a regular cargo of the very latest, newly varnished, newly decorated, and fashionably served up fallacies and absurdities which had ever been seen. Take the delusion that the revenue of the country ,u could be raised by taxing the foreigner. Did Mr. Chamberlain believe that himself? They would remember how at Glasgow he proposed to exempt maize and bacon from the list of articles which he proposed to tax, because they were consumed by the poor. If the foreigner paid the tax on corn, why would he not pay on maize, too? If the foreigner paid it on beef, why did he refuse to pay it on bacon? It was a great confession, and Mr. Chamberlain quite clearly realised that the idea of taxing the foreigner was an ideal founded upon a quick- y foreigner was an ideal founded upon a quick- sand. Mr. Churchill concluded with a defence of individualism as against Socialism. The work- ing-classes, he said, should have liberty to strike. Under Socialism the State would be the only employer, and the majority of the people would have the deciding of the conditions of labour. No strike could be tolerated, for labour would then be in revolt against the sovereign authority of the people. The lot of the masses should be improved through the existing structure of society rather than by the building up of an entirely new system. But, added Mr. Churchill, if he lived in Germany he should be a Socialist himself. He should be against militarism, conscription, the high protective tariff, and the despotic form of Government, which made Germany a most miserable place for a poor man in a plain coat and a stove-pipe hat to live.

THE BROTHERHOOD OF SCIENCE,

BISHOP'S CURSE.

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EPITOME OF NEWS. I