Hide Articles List

24 articles on this Page

[No title]

[No title]

Advertising

4 IXI,000 WORTH OF JEWELLERY…

I TIBET EXPE DITION.

THE GABLE KECOJELD. *

[No title]

SKETCH OR PLAY.

[No title]

J SHOOTING OUTRAGE AT THE…

[No title]

Advertising

_._.___.__-__-'-LONDON BANK…

[No title]

Advertising

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising

.TOWN TOPICS j

INEWS NOTES.'I

News
Cite
Share

I NEWS NOTES.' King Victor Emmanuel and Queen Helena are highly delighted with their brief visit to Britain, and particularly with the warm recep- tion they had at every public appearance they made. The august young pair may be pardoned for wishing that Sovereigns were as safe and well-beloved by all their subjects in Italy as in England but their Majesties are certainly doing their best to deserve the esteem of their people, and to compass happiness for the sunny southern land over which they have been called to reign, and it is not in mortals to do more. Mr. Warner's team of English cricketers representing our M.C.C. have done remarkably well so far out at the Antipodes: They out- played South Australia at Adelaide, and then disposed in succession of Victoria and New South Wales with more than an innings to spare. This looks promising for the tests to come for now Mr. Warner's men have each and all showed themselves to be in capital form, and they have practically met all the present time cracks of Australia. Hugh Trumble, they say, will play in some of the tests," and he may make a difference; and we note that Clem Hill was the other day in grand form against Victoria with the bat. If these two doughty players are at their best when M.C.C. meet the full strength of Australia, and Noble, Trumper and a few others come off," the Antipodeans with level luck will give our men a good trying up; but Mr. Warner and his merry men will take the field in good heart. We are very hopeful that they will come back with a record of triumph. Things are 11 simmering again in the Near East, and the Sultan is showing a complaisance which may be real or may be assumed as to the sit- uation but it must be said that in diplomatic circles considerable scepticism is being felt as to any unconditional acceptance of reform by Turkey. In face of the dissatisfaction freely expressed by the Slav elements in Macedonia with the dual reform programme, its final acceptance by the Porte, after the long resist- ance, cannot be considered to hold out a -pro mise of providing anything more than a tem- porary respite for all the parties concerned. Constantinople is scarcely a city in which to seek successfully for candour or sincerity. Meanwhile, however, it is some consolation in the fact that bloodshed for the time being is stopped. It is characteristic of the kindliness of our King that his Majesty should have given orders that meat and meal from the Royal and other tables should be distributed each morning while the Court is in residence at the castle to the poor of Windsor. To prevent imposition, the local clergy have been given tickets, which are to be distributed by them to widows and the poorest of the poor. About fifty persons were the recipients of the Royal bounty the other morning for the first time under the new arrangement, which is so far very pleasing in its effect. A quaint ceremony, reminiscent of feudal days, was on Saturday carried out at Dunferm- line, when Mr. Andrew Carnegie's scheme of <! sweetness and light" for his native place was publicly inaugurated. Mr. Carnegie formally handed over Pittencrieff Park and Glen to the inhabitants of Dunfermline. He had pre- viously given £ 500,000 in trust for the town. In the park the ancient ceremony of taking public infeftment of the gifts was per- formed. Mr. T. Shaw, M.P., as bailie authorised by Mr. Carnegie, handed symbols of land (earth), houses (stone), teinds (a handful of grass), and mill (the clap and hammer of the mill) to the trustees; who pledged themselves to administer the property in accordance with the directions of the donor. Dunfermline is a favoured town. Rumours are spreading of the existence of a secret treaty between Russia and Tibet. The Chinese Government is said to have obtained precise knowledge as to the signing of the mysterious Convention, to be much perturbed thereby, and to have recalled its representative at Lhassa. One fears that there is trouble afoot here. The dark places of the earth are full of the habitations of cruelty still. Mr. Norman Mac- kenzie, of the Church Missionary Society, de- scribing his experiences in connection with the dreadful famine in the Kwang-si, a province of Southern China, says: "The distress was cer- tainly more acute here than in any place visited subsequently. It was here where human flesh, usually that of executed criminals, were sold in open market. Women and girls were sold by the hundred, and taken to Canton and else- where, until it was estimated that some 10,000 or more had been sold." Not even famine of the direst wouM warrant such dreadful doings as this. There has this week been opened at Brighton the National Inventions Exhibition, at which women are credited with the creation of muck the larger number of the things on sliow. Among tie most aotable may be mentioned tike following: A collap- sible sunshade for cycling, a com- bination kitchen table, which caa be meta- morphosed into a writing-desk, and an appli- ance for cleaning windows without servants. There has also been placed on exhibition a remarkable invention for preventing candle drips and for making light brighter. The wit of womanhood evinces no sign of waning

I HE SAVED LIFE.-

HEBREWS TN THE ARMY, I

fBISHOP OF CHESTER MOBBED.

I FLOODS IN INDIA.