Hide Articles List

24 articles on this Page

[No title]

[No title]

Advertising

4 IXI,000 WORTH OF JEWELLERY…

I TIBET EXPE DITION.

THE GABLE KECOJELD. *

[No title]

SKETCH OR PLAY.

[No title]

J SHOOTING OUTRAGE AT THE…

[No title]

Advertising

_._.___.__-__-'-LONDON BANK…

[No title]

Advertising

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising

.TOWN TOPICS j

News
Cite
Share

TOWN TOPICS j (From Our London Correspondenti.) I The Italian Sovereigns have now returned to their own country ?,t the conclusion of their few days sojourn at Windsor as the guest of King Edward and Queen Alexandra and en ail hands it is recognised that the visit has proved a complete success both from the personal as well as the political point of view, the latter indeed having already been the subject of highly satisfactory semi-official assurances. There is no doubt that King Victor Emmanuel and his beautiful consort were delighted with the real warmth of the popular reception everywhere accorded to them, and particularly in the streets of the capital on the occasion of their presence here to receive an address from the City Corporation and lunch with the Lord Mayor and Lady Mayoress and a brilliant company at the Guildhall. Though not perhaps so imposing a figure as his father, the late King Humbert, who, with his magni- ficent white moustache and his erect military carriage, presented a most striking appearance, the present ruler of Italy is a handsome man, and what he may lack in stature he makes up in personal charm. This latter characteristic was strikingly shown on the afternoon before I his departure, when, although fatigued from a full day's shooting in the Royal preserves, he received a Bu-mber of deputations in his apart- ments at the castle. A prominent member of one of the deputations tells me that the whole party were greatly struck by the King's extreme courtesy and affable manner, and they also admired the ready felicity with which in his reply he seized upon the principal points in a long address read to him, though not having had the opportunity of previously perusing it. Queen Elena achieved instant popularity, her beauty and gracefulness winning all hearts. Photographs do not do her Majesty justice, for the camera cannot reproduce the brilliancy of her splendid dark eyes, which undoubtedly constitute her most striking feature. The present year has been rendered notable by the exchange of visits between the Sovereign of this realm and the heads of the two principal Latin nations; and as these State amenities largely assist to secure the maintenance of friendly relations between the various peoples. King Edward is assuredly entitled to the thanks of all his subjects. Some important changes have lately occurred or will shortly take place in the personnel and proprietary of London daily journalism. Mr. Fisher, who succeeded Mr. H. W. Massingham in the-editorial chair of the Daily Chronicle," will soon retire; and the appointment of a successor is arousing a good deal of interest. The St. James's Gazette" has quite recently changed hands, and Mr. C. Arthur Pearson has, it is understood, a controlling interest in the property; while within the last few days the evening Sun"âfounded some years ago by Mr. T. P. O'Connor, M.P.âwhich has of late witnessed several changes in its ownership, has passed into the hands of a strong syndicate, of which the principal members are the pro- prietors of the "Globe" and the People." The "Sun," I may recall, has enjoyed the unique experience of being edited" for one day only by the late Dr. Parker as well as by Mr. Dan Leno, and other well-known per- sonages; and further novel and ingenious devices have been utilised in order to bring its claims to the notice of the evening paper buying public. Another recent development in metropolitan journalism has been the establish- ment of a penny morning paper for the gentler sex under the attractive title of the Daily Mirror." Those interested in the preservation of commons and open spaces are hoping that the example of the Earl of Onslow, the President of the Board of Agriculture, in agreeing to the regulation of the land over which he holds manorial rights, will be followed by other large landowners in various parts of the country. In its last report just published here for the counties of Kent and Surrey the Commons and Footpaths Preservation Society pays a tribute to the attitude which Lord Onslow has adopted in respect of his Surrey manors, the society having recently received an assurance from his lordship that he will always be ready to agree to the regulation of his commons situate near an urban centre, and a scheme will shortly be completed by which the regulation of Merrow Downs will be accomplished. The Downs consist of hundreds of acres of undulating land in the neighbourhood of Guildford, and are noteworthy from the fact that they contain the famous clump of yew trees known as New-Jands Corner, which is among the finest group of yews in the United Kingdom. People not possessing a banking account frequently experience some difficulty in cashing cheques, even small ones, particularly if they live in country districts, and now that the activities of the county councils are still further increased through the duty of administering the Education Act. there will'be a considerable multiplication of the disbursements to he made by those authorities, involving the issue of innumerable small cheques. In view of the inconvenience thereby resulting-to those who .-have no account with bankers, a useful little proposal has been submitted to the Executive body of the County Councils Association to the effect that steps should be taken to arrange with the Treasury and Post Office for the payment at any post-oface in England and Wales of cheques drawn by any English or Welsh county council up to an amount to be fixed by the Departments in question. Without endorsing the proposition, the Execu- tive tli-as agreed to approach the Treasury and the Postmaster General to ascertain their views as to the practicability of such a scheme, and a deputation waited on the Financial Secretary to the Treasury and the chief permanent officials this week. The plan outlined has much to commend it, and might moreover be extended to include other public bodies. The Post Office I âtheoretically at leastâexists for the con- venience of the public, and Lord Stanley, the new Postmaster General, has here an opportunity of iiftroducing a really useful minor reform. j It is reported here with some show of autho- j rity that the Metropolitan police will shortly receive an all-round increase in pay of three shillings a week, but as yet nothing has been officially announced on the subject; and it has, moreover, to be borne in Imind that as the force is directed under the Government, in which respect it is unique among English con- stabularies, any augmentation of pay must be carried out by Act of Parliament. The other body of police doing duty in the capitalâthe City )orce-is administered by the Corpora- I tion, and by reason of the better remuneration and the nighter standard imposed in regard to stature may fairly fee accounted finest in the country, it not in the world, semi-military con- stabularies being, of course, excepted from such a comparison. One change which it is now said will be introduced in connection with the raising of the Metropolitan police pay j Involves the disappearance of the R. or Reserve class, which is composed of men of long service and good conduct, who aro held in readiness for special occasions, and who may be seen on duty in the vicinity of the Houses of Parlia- ment, the Government buildings and public Institutions and the like. These receive an extra allowance of a shilling per diem, which, however, rloes not count for pension. The pro- Eosed additional three shillings in pay would ardlv suit the officers now in the R. class to lose their present extra shilling a day in order to receive on retirement a slightly higher pension. Borne figures relating to the numbers of the j force and the territory o'er which it keeps its I watch and ward," show what an immense organisation is required bv the metropolis. With a total strength of sixteen thousand of all ranks, it polices a district extending over a radius of fifteen miles from Charing-crttss (excluding the City of London) with a rateable value of nearly forty-five millions sterling and embracing an area of over six hundred and eighty-eight square miles. =1 am told by a leading official in the cycling world that although the concessions made by all the railways, which came into force in the spring, have proved a decided boon to cyclists, very little has been done on the part of the companies to provide special accommodation for machines in transit. Certain lines, it is true, have had appliances in existence for years; and he thinks that the other railways will in their own interests have to follow suit, because with their new liability for compensation for damage done they will find the present method of piling bicycles in a heap in the van rather too expen- sive to be continued. My informant added that the best appliance he had yet seen was the in- vention of a London and North-Western guard, being wimple in construction and working well in practice. It is a two-fold arrangement, one for holding the machines upright, and the other for holding them on the floor; and when not in use it folds up and rests at the side of the van. While a further advantage is that it can be applied to existing vans with onlv a little expense. W R.

INEWS NOTES.'I

I HE SAVED LIFE.-

HEBREWS TN THE ARMY, I

fBISHOP OF CHESTER MOBBED.

I FLOODS IN INDIA.