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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2. goal. which only just missed the mark. The collapse of the Irish team. was simply sensa- tional, and whenever the ball was fairly out In the open, it looked any odds on Wales scaring. Johnny Williams, after receiving from Gabe, made a gallant effort to croes, but "was pushed too close to the touch-line, and his re-pass went wrong. The next incident Was the penalizi-ag of David for obstructing AlacLear when that player was dribbling tawards the centre. For some infringement which could not 'be detected from the press- box, another penalty wae given to Ireland. and, Jack Brown, failing to hold the ball, a serum was ordered in no man's land. The Welshmen slackened down obviously, and were evidently quite content with their lead. Play was in neutral ground when the referee blew his whistle for final suspension of hos- tilities, and Wales had won a fine, attractive game full of triking, exhilarating incidents. Final score. G. T. P'ts. WADES 4 4 29 1 IRELAND 0 0 0 I "Forward's" Conlments I In the hour of such a great triumph ones first impulsa is to be generous, and while rejoicing with a full heart over one of the most sensational victories in the history of international Rugby, it is with a feeling of j pride, tempered by compassion, that one sits down to comment upon such a game. During the past ten years Wales has achieved a reputation in the world of Rugby football which is the envy, not only of the three sister nations in the homeland, but also of every country across the seas wb ro a Rugby ball has become an integral of that country's sport. Her reputation has been won through sheer, dogged determination on the one hand, and the cultivation of science on the other in the playing of a game which more truly represents the genius of the British race than any other form of sport. In the early days of Rugby in Wales it was not an uncommon experience to be beaten- and beaten badly-by England and Scotland, but from the very beginning there has been a delightful evenness in the co-relative strength and prowess of Ireland and Wales on the Rugby field. Looking at the records, one finds that Wales has a credit balance of five victories in the aggregate, including the victory, but that disparity in actual results of matches is not correctly representative of that even- ness to which I have referred. I There is always a feeling of uncertainty and anxiety in the Welsh camp when Ire- land has to be met, and prior to the begin- ning of hostilities to-day that was the predominant feeling everywhere. Even those o-ptimists who set aside their judgment and voluntarily allowed the wish to be father to the thought never dreamed for a moment of 29 points to nil, and to have predicted such a. result in the presence of any company of Iiiberniams would have been tantamount to "amother injustice to I Ireland." But the beating, decisive as it was, cannot be clcussed as that category, for there was not one single point out of the twenty-nine that was mot deserved. I have already spoken of the many bril- liant achievements which have gained for the Principality an abiding reputation in Rugby football; but, reviewing calmJy and deliberately every one of them separately a/nd collectively, I shall not be tre.spaasing on the ground of exaggeration in saying that Wales never rose to a higher pinnacle than she did to-day. "Everything attempted" waa "everything done," and there was scarcely a movement which developed itself beyond the embryonic etage which did not end in a score for Wales. Such was the consummate skill blended with keenness and cleverness in attack on the part of the weavers of the red that the defence of the Irishmen was made to appear the very essence of feeble- ness. Their weakness was more apparent than real, but for all that it will probably be taken by those Swansea men who were euch patriote as to desire the defeat of their country as an explanation of the overwhelm- ing supremacy of Wales. One does not like to be unduly unkind, but surely this victory ought to teach those Westerners who were in the sulks a. very salutary lesson. If one might be allowed to vary an old Welsh axiom, I would emphasise to them the truth of tha-t axiom in paraphrased form, "Trech Gwlad ua thref." One well-known critic who waa asked his opinion at the close of the game was merci- lessly cruel in his irony when he said, "The Swansea contingent played splendidly," a.nd the fact that that critic came from Lanca- RhJre with no biased prec:Lileoti5 of any ki-nd. and   18 elOq-UeDt proof of the light in w<ili 8wa.s  vi? outSIde the ?ââ pa1ity. ??ha.ve dwelt long enough on ? ^fort,u- nate?nd painful topic, but only with te one honest object in view of rendenng It impossible for any club or section of tn lot ball fraternity of Wales to emulate a bad example. To the victors the spoils. And in the dis- tribution of those spoils one could not pos- sibly be too careful in sharing them fairly and equitably between the different sections of the triumphant Cymric combination. There was not a man in the whole team who did not add to or enhance his reputa- tion by his sterling work on this memorable occasion. jjot me begin with the forwards. Not for mainy year&-i-f. indeed, -e-ver-h,- I seen a pack of Irish forwards so thoroughly ana completely beaten in every phase of forward. play as that pack which sported the sham- rock to-day. The Welsh forwards were simply magnificent. In the scrums they played with restraint and disciplined strategy, which pnTnm an djftri. the unstinted admira-tion of everybody, while in the loose they were as aery, a.nd, indeed, more impetuous than â¢Jie Irish forwards themselves, but they wzre lever wild or raeh on a single occasion and never once lost control of the ball. They knew exactly when to heel and when to wheel, and as a result of their superb Judgment in these two directions we have â ^directly amd directly this astounding aggregate of Z9 pointa. No inducement would tempt, me to men- tion one of them more than another, but I may be permitted to say that in the exercise of his discretion in utilising A. F. Harding the finest possible generalship was shown by E. T. Gabe, as commander of the Cymric brigade. At one time Harding ?ght  been seen pnahin? and working ? ha-rd as a,ny forward iwth-e serum, and at a:noter period he was a conspicuous figure in assist- ing the Welsh backs. So far as I could judge, he was not misplaced on a single oocasiom, and it is only fair to him, as whose form wae in doubt before the ma/tch, that it should be said that his trip to Paris had not the slightest effect upon his play. Though the dilemma created by the defec- tion of Serino and Gibbs looked serious at one time, one does not regret, now that the game baa been lost amd won, that the con- Itingency should have arisen which brought Ha,rding into the team. He was more than useful both as rover and as full-back, and contributed at least his fair share to the signal victory of his side. In some degr eethe selection of David amd Bush was in the nature of experiment. At least, it was reg-arded in that light in some quarters, but by others the opinion was held âand I sihared in such a viewâthat the wisest thing was done in playing Bush and David as elaborates, especially after the failure of the Cardiff captain to hit it off with Owen in previous interniational matches. Bush has completely vindicated himself and rehabilitated his reputation as one of the grea-test. half-backs of the day, and I cannot help saying that I felt a pardonable pride in the fact that I was among the first to suggest him being played as am outside half. Cardiff people have contended consistently that Bush had every right to be in partnership with David before his play could be fairly judged, and to-day's demonstration of their combined work was a. complete justification of that view. David, Bush. Gabe. and J. L. Williams were really the outstanding figures in the Welsh back division. The try scored by Bush was a. marvel of chaa-acteristic brilliancy, and the game remark" can be applied, though, in a. lesser degree, to his dropped goaJ. Gabe bag played many great games for Wales since he came into the Welsh team is a reserve in 1901, but he never plaYed in form th,ait; could be placed on a parallel with his magnificent display to-day. Taking to-day's exhibition by it-If. there was never a stronger left wing representing any country, T. L. Williams hitt-i-n-g it off to per- fection with his captain, who must bav-fc ex- perienoed one of the proudest moments of his life in leading his side to such, a, glorious victory and in setting his comrades such a notable example. Keverting to the half-backs, my honest con- viction is that Wales 'has not beem so well served as she was to-day in that department, for a couple of years, and practical demon- stration was given to the vital importajmce of playing two half-backs who thoroughly understood each other's play. I have not yet said a. word about the Pontypool men, and whait I have to say is that they aoqxiitted tdiemselves xdmirably, a-nd D. O. Jones, as a novise to interna- tional honours, has every reason to feel gratified in having done so well for his country. Winfield, at full-back, played a game quite in keeping with his reputation, although there were occasions when he fell just a little below his best form in finding touch. But that was only in theopening stages of the game, and once he ha,d found his feet he gave a masterly display. Not only was his kicking excellent, but his catching and fielding of the ball and his tackling were all that could be desired. Now, with regard to the Irishmen, my first word is that they disappointed me ter- ribly. Their forwards were hopelessly out- classed, and one missed sadly those fierce irresistible rushes inseparably associated with Irish Rugby football. They were held in absolute subjection all through the piece, and were perfectly tame and harmless in comparison with many of the I packs one has seen in the course of a long expe- rience. My prediction that Caddell would be sorely missed at half-back was only too true, Harvey making only an indifferent substitute. He and Robinson found their ,masters in Bush and David, and they had a really bad time of it. The Irish three-quarters were poor, Parke and Miaclear being the only two men to show international form. Why Maclear is played on the wing instead o f in the centre is quite beyond my comprehension. A wing three-quarter must of necessity depend largely on the opportunities that are made for him, and the Dublin Fusilier is just the type otfman who ought to be placed in a position where he can make opportunities for himself. I saw him play his first inter- uaitional match against England at Cork, and. the impression I carried away from that match was that he was destined to make a mark in football history as one of the greatest centres, not onl Ireland, but any other country, had ever produced. His play to-day was such a revelation that his name spreadd all over Ireland as that of a heaven-sent 'centre. And I remember, after the match, a well-known breeder of horses giving his word that the horse he intended running in the nxt Grand National would be named Maclear. With the few opportunities that came his way to-day, and that he made for himself, he showed some glimpses of his greatness, but nature never intended him to be a wing three-quarter, and the sooner this fact, is realised the stronger will be Ireland's three- quarter line. The Irish custodian, as a recruit, performed creditably, and 'his play was only marred during periods when hesitancy on his part, looked like letting his side in. He cannot be blamed for one of h.ci tries scored by Wales, as thafinæt defensive full-back in the world could not have prevented one of the scores registered against his side. Finally, it can only be sa,id in mitdgaition of Ireland's rout tha.t they met the repre- sentatives of "Gallant Little Wales" on the very top of their form, and they have t.hi3 consolation that no Irish team has ever played or ever been defeated by a more 'harmonious or .perfect Cymric combination.

Another Injustice

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