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GERMAN FAILURE IN ATTACKS…

LATEST SUGAR HINTS. -I

QUEEN TO COMMAND W.A.A.C.s.I

STOLE COMRADES' PARCELS. j

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ITHE GALLANT CANADIANS.I

OVER 35,001 MEN SERVING IN…

GERMAN BURIAL GROUND. I

GENERAL BY SELECTION. I

P-100 FINE FOR OVERCHARGE.…

CARROTS FOR HORSES. I

IBAR TO WOMAN M.P. !

IIN LIGHTER VEIN 1

THE "THIN RED LINE." I

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IBOOKS AND -MAGAZINES. j

W.A.A.C.S IN THE GREAT BATTLE.…

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GREETINGS ON ANNIVERSARY OF…

BETTING CIRCULARS. I - I

GERMANY'S LAST COLONY.I

PROFITEERING IN SWEETMEAT.…

JUMPED FROM TRAIN. I

COLONEL'S THREE SONS KILLED.…

LORD TENNYSON'S SON KILLED.I

EAST TYRONE ELECTION. I

SON BORN TO LORD JELLICOE.…

A BISHOP'S RATIONS.I

EUPIIRATES CAPTURES. J

BEGGAR'S GOLD HOARD.1

M.M. WON THREE TIMES. I

THE IRISH CONVENTION. I

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ifWWBiJl?<Brnrrrr,Nr n m I MOTHER ND HOM& Procrastination is not only "the thief ol time it steals away a great deal of domes. tic comfort and happiness. "How froq ftently it happens," remarks a housewife, that in an average household each person waits for another one to get out of bed. Every- body wants someone else to lead the way. As a consequence the habit of late rising is established, obrooIqast is a time of Lurry and confusion, and the ma4c members grumble bitterly at the prospect of being late for business. Where possible, the housewife sJkH&d be the first member of the family to rise, so that everything may bo ready when the rest come down. Breakfast is an impor- tant meal, and should be taken leisurely. No excuse for being late at the table should be accepted, and if the day is started well everything will tend to order and harmony." r THE LARD. Have the larder window open jiight and I day, and if you haven't a perforated zinc screen over it, tack a piece of coarse muslin over the opening to keep out dust and flies. I DUTY IN THB HOHE. It is impossible to build the ruper-structtre o publio virtue save on private virtue (says a contemporary}. The vital question is to have the home prosorvi-ci. If the average husband and wife fulfil their duties toward one another and toward their children, other problems will solve themselves. The worthi- ness of life depends upon the way in which everyday duties are done. The home duties are the vital ones. The nation is but the aggregato of families within its border, and tf the average man is not hard working, just, and fearless in his dealings with others, then our average of public life will in the end be low, for the stream can rise no higher than Eta source. In a family the child must be barught that it is but part of a wle. that it must recognise the rights of others, and learn that every human being must work, in some way, in- this world. I STORED CLOTHES. Clothes which have been shut up in. a drawer or box for some time often have a musty smell; and if this does not disappear after they have been exposed to the air, take some pieces of charcoal, Wirap them in paper, and lay them in the folds of the garment*. HINTS TOR DRESSMAKERS. When sewing a seam in thick material I always rub a piece of dry soap along the line the needle is to follow. This will make it slip easily through the stuff. Always tack a seam before machining it. Cut a button- hole so small that the button will only just go through it. The hole is sure to stretch later on, and if you get it too large to start with it will be simply enormous in a very short time. If a piece of material eeema likely to shrink in the wash it should be- laundered and dried before being cut out. The first washing is always the one that causes the shrinkage. Remember that sleeves always wear up a little, so make them amply long enough in the first place. CHEAP EMBROCATION. A cheap and excellent embrocation for use in every home is made as follows:âOne gill of oil of turpentine, one gill of white wine vinegar, two ounces of liquid ammonia, the white of one egg. Put a-H into a bottle and mix well together. WASHING FRAGILE FABRICS. Surprisingly durable will casement -clir- fcains of extremely fine net or muslin be found when washed at home by a slow and careful process. All rubbing and wringing must be avoided, oleanliness being restored chiefly by means of cold water. It may have to be changed at short intervals at least a. doze* times before it runs off clear, hasten- ling tko extraction by squeezing or pressure only. This preliminary concluded, the next step is to squeeze whatever is being washed as dry as may be without injury to the fabric, and after a good soaping cover with cold water in an enamelled pan, or enclose I in a pillowcase n u$ia £ ..the^ copper. A few minutes' gentle boiling and a good rinse will satisfactorily complete the process. TORN W ALLPAPER. EYELASHES AND EYEBROWS. To improve eyelashes .and eyebrows, smooth them every night with a very little pure coconut or olive oil. Be sure no coconut oil gets between the lids, or it will make the eyes smart. Olive oil is quite harmfcea. To WASH AN EtoEanowy. Make a strong lather with warm water and some good soap-powder, and add to this a tablespoonful of Tinegar, to prevent the 1 colours of the eiderdown from running. Place the eiderdown in the suds, and squeeze the dirt out gently with the hands, taking care not to rub it As the water becomes dirty, make some fresh soapsuds, and transfer the eiderdown to thia. "When quite clean, rinse in clean warm water, squeeze as dry as pos- sible with the hands, and hang in the open air to dry. The eiderdown should be shaken occasionally whilst drying, to prevent the down from settling in one place. WASHINS BRUSHES. The best way to wash a brush is to dip it into a solution of a tablespoonful of am- monia (the household kind) and three quarto of water. When the brush ia clean, rinse it thoroughly in several changes of warm water, or running warm water, and then dip it into cold water. Dry by hanging it up by the handle. FIZECKLES, Try the following 'troatment for a week or two for freokle removing. After bathing the taoe in fairly hot water, get a camel-hair brush and touch each freckle with a lotion composed of one ounce of lemon-juice, half a drachm of powdered borax, half a drachm of sugar. These ingredients should be well mixed and put into a bottle, closely stop- pered, and allowed to stand a few days before using. Avoid letting the sun touch your face, as this increases the freckles. To CLEAN WINDOWS- To clean windows quickly, go the whole round of the windows and rub each with a cloth which has been dipped in paraffin oil Then return to the first one, and polish with a soft, dry cloth. A splendid polish is obtained, and the paraffin prevents flies from settling on the window. To RENOVATE A CABPET. Take half a pound of any good soap, shred Hi, and boil it in a gallon of water. When dissolved pour the mixture into a pail and stir into it a quarter of a pound of salts of tartar. With this wash the carpet, doing a small portion at a time. and rinsing each piece with warm water immediately. The carpet should be rubbed dry with a clean, cloth, bit by bit; as it is rinsed, and it wiU look clean and bright when finished. REBOOTING STOCKINGS. Machine-made stockings may be re-footed in this wise: Cut off above the worn part evenly; then turn in the edge and herring- bone it neatly with fine cotton. This done, overcast with blanket-aitch, using wool. Put the stiches close together, and after- wards take them up on a knitting needle and knit in the usual way. Woven noBe are made of such a fine wool that it wou)d hardly be possible to pick up stitches after severance from the foot of the stocking. Re- paired as directed, the stockings would be made tidy again.

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