ο»Ώ SWANS KA TELEGRAPH MESSENGERS.|1897-04-10|Herald of Wales and Monmouthshire Recorder - Welsh Newspapers Online
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ALLEGED DISHONEST LAD

BATTLESHIPS IN COLLISION.

KATE VAUGHAN IN THEI -DIVORCE…

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I AffBS NADIA SYTVA- I

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I IN - HORRIBLE DEATH.]

THE SWANSEA MARKET-1

I'RATING OF A 'SEWAGE i FARM.

I ZOAR CHAPEL BAZAAR.

PENILLION COFFA DW RIAETH…

New Magistrs...

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IM. HANOTAUX. I

THE GRIEVANCES OF THE TELEGRAPHISTS.

-TTTLE WAR. THE LATEST LITTLE…

] SWANSEA UNION.

IMRS. VYE-PARMINTER'SI PUPILS.I

SWANS KA TELEGRAPH MESSENGERS.

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SWANS KA TELEGRAPH MESSENGERS. I Proposed Formation of an Institute. I Prize Distribution by the Mayoress. Speeches by the Mayor, Swansea Post- Master, Revs, James Owen, and L A. Mathews, A meeting was held at Holy Trinity School- room on Wednesday evening for the purpose of inaugurating a telegraph messengers' insti- tute in connection with the Swansea Post Office. The Mayor (Councillor Howel Watkins) pre- sided, and was supported by the Mayoress, the Revs. A. A. Mathews, James Owen, Mr. E. Davies (medical officer of the department), Mr. and Macs. J. H. Rosser, Mr. Barnett (postmaster), and the principal officials of the postal &nd telegraphic branches. Alter letters of apology for inability to attend had been read from the ax-Mayor and Mr. B. Evans, The Mayor, in opening the proceedings, alluded to the highly satisfactory manner in which the telegraph messengers as a. ciaes per- formed their duties. Those auties were of great importance to the community at large, and especially so to the commercial section, for upon the promptness with which they were executed depended maaiy important issues. Looking baok over a long business career he honestly say that the mistakes made by messengers and pastmem were few and far between, and when it was borne in mind the number of telegrams that passed through the hands of the boys the difficulty in locating the addresses, owing to more than one street hav- ing the same name, it reflected the highest credit upon the messengers for the diligence and perseverance they displayed. After refer- ring to the immense development telegraphy had made, in recent years, and its bearing upon the business and social life of the pub- lic, the Mayor went on to express his sympathy with the objects of the meeting. He earnestly counselled the boys to bo careiul in the habits they adopted, and above all things to avoid the prevailing evil of betting, which wrecked so many valuable lives. They could take it from him that in all ills long experience he had known a betting man who was a æppy man. In conclusion, his Worship oon- gratulated the boys upon having as the chief officer a gentleman like Mr. Barnett, who took a. deep interest in their welfare, and who was so highly esteemed by all classes in the town who were brought into contact with him. After a. section of the boys had been put through a. course of manual exercises by In- spectors Davies 0,00 Bartlett, The Postmaster explained the objects of the meeting, viz., the formation of an institute and the distribution of prizes to & certain num- ber of boys who were entitled to them. As regarded the institute, it was the outcome of the action of a few ladies and gentlemen not connected with the Post Office, who a few years ago interested themselves in the messen- gers employed in the General Post Office at St. Martin:s-i«-Grand, and who succeeded in establishing a. meeting-place for the lads, where they could be suitably entertained and m sLructed. That effort proved so successful as to induce the Department to take the mattei up, and similar institutions were formed throughout the metropolitan districts. Here, again, the results had been so gratifying that the Postmaster-General felt justified in applving to the Treasury for a grant to enable institutes to be formed at all the larger offices in the provinces. The Treasury had favourably enter- tained the o.ppli tbn, and had made a grant fairly reasonable in amount, but which, through having to be split up over so many office was not so large as could be wished. It was hoped to make the institution self-supporting, although he had no doubt that if tireum- stances rendered it necessary to apply to the townspeople for a little support it wonki be! readiiy given. (Hear, hetw.) The institute was intended to give the boys an opportunity for wholesome recreation combined with an intedlectuafj moral), spiritual training. An present would see what an excellent physical training was given in the drill exercises which they had just witnessed, and to this would be added a drum aod life band. (Loud cheering from the boys.) Judging from the reception given to that statement, it would be highly appreciated. The Department did not, how- ever, regard the social benefits conferred by institutes as the most important. On the con- trary, they considered them as auxiliaries to the higher and better training which would be furnished by means of the various classes which would be started when the long autumn and winter evenings came round again. A library would be formed at the office, M as to enable the messengers to utilise their spare time while waiting for messages in acquiring interest- ing and useful information. Possibly many gentlemen in the town might have a few spare books on their shelves which they might feel disposed to contribute, and if they would! kindly drop him a card to that effect he would have great pleasure in sending for them. Edu- cational classes would be formed, in which the lads would receive sound instruction calculated to fit them for amy position they might be able to secure outside the service, because it was a regrettable fact that the number of lads employed by the Department was far greater than they could find vacancies for at a more advanced age. Lastly, a Bible class would be formed', and every effort made to extend the principles of temperance and thrift. It would thus be seen that the Postmaster-General and his immediate advisers fully recognised their responsibility in having command over such a. vast number of boys throughout the country at an age when they were so sensitive to surrounding influences, and that an honest endeavour was being mllde to meet that re- sponsibility in a right spirit. It would also be a matter of great gratification to the parents of the boys to find so much interest taken in them. and that they would receive such in excellent training. With this explanation and his very sincere thanks to the ladies and gentlemen on the platform who bad so kindly come forward to show their sympathy with the movement, he had much pleasure in asking the Mayoress to distribute the prizes, consisting of a dozen valuable books, to that number of boys. The distribution was performed in a graceful manner, the Mayoress kindly giving few words otf encouragement to all the recipients. The Rev. James Owen then addressed the boys in his usual earnest and impressive manner, fol- lowing up the kev-note of the Mayor's speech— the great tendency to betting amongst boys and young men. Drawing from his deep store of experience, he gave vivid examples of the many blighted lives he had come across through this one sin, and in most earnest bones urged them to avoid betting as they wofJd the plague. It was passible that the temptation might be greater to telegraph boys than to others of the same age because they bad to carry so many messages dealing with the evil, but whatever their temptations might be he implored them to stand firm and to say "No." They should remember the words of the good old book son, when sinners entice thee, corusftnt not. In thus standing firm they would be building up bright and noble characters, and making their lives good and useful. If he might leave one bit of counsel with them it would be that they should make the most of their opportunities. In their moments of leisure, in the hours of business wherever they were and whatever they were called upon to do, let them live up to every op- portunity of being good and worthy men, having not only the favour of their chief officer here, but also of the great chief officer xbove, who would one day say to them Well done, thou good and faithful servant." The Rev. A. A. Mathews next addressed! the meeting. With his customary eloquence he fol- lowed up the remarks of the previous speaker on the subject of betting by saying that the Mayor had spoken to them as a business man with all the weight attached to a long and pros- perous business career, which had finally placed him in the position to which all right-minded and worthy citizens should aspire His dear friend, MI". Owen, had given his opinion as a servant of God—one who had grown grey in the service of his Master. He (the speaker) would look at the question from another standpoint— that of the athlete—and he, too, would urge them to have nothing to do with the terrible evil of betting. He referred in a touching manner to the funeral of Mr. W.H. Gwynn, which had taken place the previous day, and remarked how, an otle occasion when he had preeehed on the subject, Mr. Gwynn had thanked him for doing so, and had been one of the foremost in seeking to stop the evil on the football field. He drew a pretty little lesson from the word prize," in which P stood- fov perseverance R, regularity; I industry; Z, zealousness; and E, excellence. If they secured the first four virtues the fifth would certainly follow, and they would grow up excellent men. In conclusion, he urged them, in football phraseology, to be always on the ball "—in work we in play always to be in ear- nest. Dr. Davies folloiwed with an address on the value of physical training, which would help them to lead sound, helÙhy lives. Votes of thanks to the Mayor, Mayoress, and the several speakers brought a meeting full of interest, and rendered he more enjoyable by the excellent singing of several members of the telegraph staff, who were acompaaaed by Mrs. rD. E. Reea, to a cloak

IMRS. JOHN RAY..I

SIR WILLIAM HARCOURT I AND…

THE YOUNG ECONOMIST. I

B. EVANS AND CO., LTD. I

ILIZZIE BELL AT THE 11 WORKHOUSE.

ISWANSEA SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION.

MORRISTON. I

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11 ! __BITS FRO!- BOOKS.

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Y DIWEDDAlt MR. DA . GETBIN…

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