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ALLEGED DISHONEST LAD

BATTLESHIPS IN COLLISION.

KATE VAUGHAN IN THEI -DIVORCE…

[No title]

I AffBS NADIA SYTVA- I

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I IN - HORRIBLE DEATH.]

THE SWANSEA MARKET-1

I'RATING OF A 'SEWAGE i FARM.

I ZOAR CHAPEL BAZAAR.

PENILLION COFFA DW RIAETH…

New Magistrs...

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IM. HANOTAUX. I

THE GRIEVANCES OF THE TELEGRAPHISTS.

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THE GRIEVANCES OF THE TELEGRAPHISTS. Indignation Mstiing at Swansea. The Rscommendatians of the Twesdmouth Committee Strongly Condemned. A meeting cf the Swansea Telegraph Staff was held at the Grand Hotel on Tuesday, to protest against the report of the Tweedmouth. Com- mittee. There was a good attendance, and the ladies turned out in gratifying numbers. The Chairman, in his opening remarks, said that the more the scheme which applied on the 1st April was examined, the more bald and uu- Kitirf&ctot'y iJ^X'carne. There could be no finality in a scheme of that kind. The present was a time for unity, and he hoped that united action backed up by the Press and public opinion, would, and at no distant date, bring about the changes in the position of the telegraph clerk so long and so bravely fought for. He would call upon a number of the staff to propose a resolu- tion, and he hoped all would endeavour to say a lew words upon a matter so vital to the welfare of every telegraph clerk in the United Kingdom. (Loud cheers) A second-class telegraphist then proposed the following resolution: "That this meeting of (Swansea Telegraph Clerks expresses its dis- satisfaction at the report and recommendations of the Tweedmouth Committee, and regrets that the Commitee should have devoted so much tention to minor grievances, when the main ques- tion was that of wages, and this meeting reiter- ates its protest made at the tune tJiat the com- position of the Committee was not of & nature to al in an unbiassed manner with the meva.nÅs hi before it. Thi? meeting fult??x pleves itæl to continue to press for a Royal Commis- sion as originally demanded, and also to support the executive in any action they may take.' The apeaker said he was pleased to see such a repre- sentative gathering as they had that evening, and ke hoped that meeting would, with one voice and in no uncertain sound, condemn the scheme that had just been introduced. Personally, the more he considered that precious scheme the more dis- gusted he got, and what at first sight appeared to be concessions, seemed to be fall of hollownesa and unreality. Abolition of classification they w always said could never be accepted alone, but it was only a partial abolition, for an inde- fined hairier still stood in the way. The double Increment promised, required increased know- ledge on their part, either that they should kaow tie work of two distinct branches, or be able to pass a technical examination. Surely a great deal of labour for a modest £ 5. The speaker went on to further criticise and denunoe ^6 scheme, and called upon those present to staid shoulder to shoulder with their fellow clerks in other offices, and unite in putting forth their best efforts to loruig aoont a. satisfactory settlement. (Cheers.) A first-class clerk in seconding the resolution, said that he feared that he did not possess the ability to respond as effectively as he could wish mi the occasion demanded. He then brought before the meeting the modest claims of the tele- graph clerks, as embodied in the evidence placed E;Ore the commission, and compared those de- mands with the scheme recently applied, and then comparing the position of telegraph clerks at present with other members of the Civil Ser- vice, with telegraph operators in the employ of cable companies, and with other kinds of clerical labour made out a strong case, showiag the jus- tice and moderation of the telegraphists ple?, than whom no more loyal and hard-worked Civil panrant existed. (Cheers.) In supporting, another first-class man, in a forcible speech, advocated the policy of no sur- render. In the past, rebuff after rebuff had been met with only to obtain eventually and in triumph the thing asked for. He advocated lightening the association ship by casting over- board all minor grievances, and sticking fast and tenaciously to the chief cargo ""increased maxi- mum and better pay after five years' service. Let them not be discouraged. Progress must and would be made. Where the van would stand to-day, the rear would camp to-morrow." (Loud cheers. ) Several sp eakers followed, most of whom d, wel,t upctn the insufficiency of pay at the end of five years' service, and the necessity of a higher maxi- mum, two Doints upon which no concessions had been obtained, from a committee, whose very composition would not allow of unprejudiced judgment. They also depricated a strike or the grounds that the Press and the public, who had been and still were their friends, would goffer thereby. They would fight their battle fairlv and souarsly, and with those forces, the press and public opinion behind us, we should succeed. After some further discussion a successful mee::ng was brought to a conclusion with a vote of thanks to the chairman. [For obvious reasons, the names of the speakers are with eld.]

-TTTLE WAR. THE LATEST LITTLE…

] SWANSEA UNION.

IMRS. VYE-PARMINTER'SI PUPILS.I

SWANS KA TELEGRAPH MESSENGERS.

IMRS. JOHN RAY..I

SIR WILLIAM HARCOURT I AND…

THE YOUNG ECONOMIST. I

B. EVANS AND CO., LTD. I

ILIZZIE BELL AT THE 11 WORKHOUSE.

ISWANSEA SUNDAY SCHOOL UNION.

MORRISTON. I

[No title]

11 ! __BITS FRO!- BOOKS.

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Y DIWEDDAlt MR. DA . GETBIN…

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