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::OUR LONDON LETTER.

MARRIED MEN CALLED UP.I

GOVERNMENT MEASURE ATTACKED…

SUBMARINES IN ATLANTIC. I

I U BOAT SUNK. —?—

OFFICER'S GALLANT ACT. I

BRICK FOR A ZEPPELIN. I

I A MAD BULLI

I AUTHOR AS ABSENTEE. I

I BOOKS AND MAGAZINES. -0-

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uDRESS OF THE DAY.I

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ILOSS OF E22 IN THE NORTH…

I MR. HAWKER'S WORLD RECORD.…

NO C.0s. NEED APPLY. II

BRAVE BRITISH OFFICERS. I

PRIZE COURT RECORD.I

I SEEING ZEPPELIN KILLS A…

I TOO TIMID FOR ARMY.I

GUNNER S FATAL DIVE.I

I PLYMOUTH TRAM FATALITY.

"TO BLOW UP ST. HELENS."

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To cure a sore throat, try an onioa poultice. For a damp cellar, fill an earthenware crock with ordinary unslaked lime. It will absorb all the damp. la dusting, wipe the dust off; do not fiiek it. A few shreds of candied lemon-peel wilt give a delicious flavour to bread pudding. Wiping the shelves with oil of cedar is said to be a good way to keep the mould from books. To stop a door-hinge from creaking, rub it with a lead pencil. to To curl feathers, damp and then roll them in curling-pins as if curling the hair. Leav& for twenty-four hours, then comb out. When cleaning the grate, always brush; the mouth of the chimney, especially at th& back of the grate. This. prevents, by re- moving all traces of soot, any chance of the chimney catching fire. A yard of cheesecloth soaked in paramn- oil. with a little linseed-oil added, makes an excellent dustcloth, and leaves a bright. surface. To clean badly-stained knives, dip a cork i-I hot water, then in fine emery powder, rub the knives with this till the stain disap- pears, then polish in the usual way. When peeling onions, place in a large basin of water and keep hands, knife and onion under water. This prevents the eyes from being affected by the onion, and the knife from smelling. Folded newspapers should be kept handy in the kitchen, and these placed under pots and kettles. If this is done every day when the pans are taken from the stove no grease spots will mar the kitchen table. A SWEEPING HINT. Save every bit of soft paper you do not need, tear it into tiny pieces, and put into a box. When turning out a room. take & large handful of these bits, wet them tho- roughly with water to which a little ammonia has been added, squeeze them, and sprinkle over carpet or nooi. You will be surprised to find how much dust they take up, and how ittle settles on furniture and.. ornaments. To REMOTE PAINT PROM GLASS. Take lib. of American potash, dissolve in- boiling water; allow this to get coot and then apply to paint with any old brush; be ca-reful not to get the liquid upon the hands or clothes. Another way to remove paint from panes of glass, they should be tho- roughly moistened with vinegar and then sponged with ammonia water; after this treatment the panes will be beautifully bright again and clean. Yet another way is as follows: American potash, 3 parts; un- slaeked lime, 1 part; lay this on with a. stick, letting it remain for some time, and it will remove either tar or paint. GREASE ON A CARPET. Make a thick paste of pipeclay and water,. and spread this thickly all over the affected part of the carpet. Allow this to dry into a. cake, and then hold the carpet in front of a. hot nre. The grease, under the influence of the heat, will be drawn from the carpet into the pipeclay, when it only remains to re- move the clay, which should be done in the garden, with the aid of a carpet beater. If the first application is not successful, re- peat until all trace of grease is removed. To CLEAN PlANO KEYS. These can be whitened by washing in a solution of loz. nitric acid to lOoz. soft water. Apply with a brush, taking care that it does not now on the wood upon which the ivory is veneered, or the job will be spoilt. Cleanse carefully with clean water and a piece of nannel. Sulphuric acid with an equal quantity of water may be used as above. If the discoloration haa not gone too far, rub the keys carefully with pure lemon juice. While still damp. put on a coating of whiting or prepared chalk, mixed with a little lemon juice. When dry, brush off with a dry brush, tak- ing care that none of the mixture geta be- tween the keys. If, however, the keys are thoroughly worn and discoloured, they must be dismounted, scraped, bleached, and re- polished, which is a long and tedious anair, and requires to be done by a skilled work, man. SOME USEFUL RECIPES. FRIED Ox KiDNEY.âCut the fat and pipes out of the kidney and divide it into small pieces. Rinse them well in cold water dry in a cloth, and dredge with Sour. Boil two large onions, chop them fine, and mix with a large breakfast cupful of sifted bread crumbs. Season the whole with pepper and salt. Heat some dripping in & p over a quick nre, fry the kidney with it. When done, keep hot. Fry onions an<t crumbs in the same pan; put them over the- kidney and serve. POTATO CAKES.âRub one quarter of a. pound of dripping into one pound of nour, then add one pound of cold boiled potatoes, one teasDoonful of salt. and one teaspoonful of baking-powder. Make a hole in the middle, and stir in as much warm milk as will bring it to the consistency of light, paatry. Roll it out about half an inch thick, and cut it into squares. Put the cakes on a greased tin, and bake them in a, moderate oven. Turn them when slightly browned on one side to the other. When cocked split open and' butter, Qerve hot. MEAT ROLY-POLY.âMake a light suet cruat as if for jam roly and spread it with any scraps of cold meat available, 6nely chopped and mixed with a little finely- chopped ham or cooked bacon. Roll up,. and boil for two and a half hours. When cooked, place in a deep dish, and pour over it some thick and well-seasoned stock. Sp'fmkle with chopped parsley and serve. BOILED FRESH HERRINGS.âFew fish ar& more delicious than these. Wash, scale, re- move the interior, and sprinkle a little salt on the herrings. Dip them once quickly in vinegar. Skewer them nrmly with their tails in their mouths. Put them into loi]- ing water, and simmer very gently u.itil done enough. Drain away the water, and arrange the fish neatly on a dish S< rve, with either shrimp, parsley or anchovy sauce in a tureen. Time to boil, about twelve minutes. HOME-MADE BRAWN.âClean one cheep's, head, and put it in a saucepan with two quarts of water. Boil it slowly till th<; meat comes off bones, then remove the. bones, add a- larcr,-) onion, sliced, a little chopped parsley, and a seasoning of pepper and salt. Boil all together fo" one hour then pour into a mould and leave till npxt day. This makea about two pounds of brawn. TOMATO FRITTERS.âTake one pound of tomatoes, season to taste, and chop very cnely, then add one egg and sufficient nour to make a smooth batter and stir in half a teaapooiiful of carbonate of soda dissolved in wat-er. Have ready a pan of very hot lard and drop the mixture by spoonfuls into the pan. Serve piled on a hot dish.

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