ļ»æ I THE WAR IN EGYPT.|1882-09-13|Haverfordwest and Milford Haven Telegraph and General Weekly Reporter for the Counties of Pembroke Cardigan Carmarthen Glamorgan and the Rest of South Wales - Welsh Newspapers Online
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I THE STATE OF IRELAND.

I THE WAR IN EGYPT.

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THE WAR IN EGYPT. THE BATTLE AT KASASSIN. KASSASIN, SATURDAY.—The rebels have given another instance of their overweening confidence to. day by boldly advancing against our positions. Soon j after daybreak our scouts fell back upon the camp with the news that the enemy were advancing in great force. All our troops were placed under arms, brigades falling in at the double, and preparations made for the attack. So far as could be ascertained at the outset, Arabi had sent forward a force of about 5,000 men to open an attack on our right front. Gen- eral Willis made his dispositions for battle. Our foroe north of the canal was drawn up in convex form, the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry and the Royal Irish Regiment, being on the right, while the 19th Hussars, and two squadrons each of the 13th and 6th Bengal Cavalry were on the extreme right. Close to the canal and railway, in what may be termed the centre of our position, but which really was the left of our force as facing the enemy, were the 60th Rifles. Next to them the marines were drawn up and they "felt" the Cornish Light Infantry. The York and Lancashire Regiment was held in reserve. Sir Baker Russell and the heavy troopers formed up in rear of the lighter Cavalry, on the extreme right, with N Battery, A Brigade, of the Royal Horse Artillery. This was the position when the enemy's shells first began whistling into our camp at six o'clock in the morning. He had spread his entire force over the ridge facing our camp about two miles off, and com- menced the Artillery fire with two guns, which our Horse Artillery replied to, and the Krupp gun which we captured from the rebels was also made use of against him. We could see that trains with further troops were hurrying up to the support of the rebels and not knowing how far Arabi might have determined to go, General Willis sent back to Mahsamech for reinforcements, and almost directly afterwards they were signalled as being on their way to us. Without waiting for them, however, an advance was imme. diately ordered, and the infantry deployed, firing as they slowly advanced, towards the ridge on the sandhills where the enemy had taken up his position G battery, B Brigade, of the Royal Horse Artillery, ran their guns up on to a sandhill in front of our right, and the York and Lancaster were ordered out to support the guns At this time—half-past seven in the morning-the firing was very heavy, the rebels sending shell after shell amongst our men, but fortu- nately very few burst. The battery on our right, however, was being excellently served, and the rebels were slowly retiring before our advancing infantry. The Artillery train was next run out, the 40-pounder shelling the enemy's right with considerable effect. Still the enemy's shot and shell were falling unpleas- antly near. One shell burst close to the 60th, but no one, marvellous to say, was injured. KASSASSIN (via ISMAILIA), TUESDAY, 9 a. m.-The last preliminaries of the coming struggle are being carried out. Yesterday Sir Garnet Wolseley inspected the ground on the south side of the canal, advancing with a small escort for a few miles in a south-westerly direction. This morning the Commander-in-Chief, with the Duke of Connaught, General Drury-Lowe, General Willis, General Wilkinson, and several officers of the head- quarters staff, with a small escort of Bengal Cavalry, proceeded again to reconnoitre the enemy's positions. Taking the route north of the canal the General sur- veyed the enemy's works from much the same locality as that from which Colonel Buller made his sketches last week. A very successful reconnaissance was effected. KASSASSIN, TTTCJSDAY, 5.30 P.M.—General orders have been issued for a forward movement of the whole army. The stents and baggage have been forwarded by railway to the nearest point to the British camp. No pBffles Wafter mxngpi. The camps

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