Haverfordwest Petty Sessions.|1898-09-07|Haverfordwest and Milford Haven Telegraph and General Weekly Reporter for the Counties of Pembroke Cardigan Carmarthen Glamorgan and the Rest of South Wales - Welsh Newspapers Online
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Haverfordwest Petty Sessions.

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Haverfordwest Petty Sessions. Monday.—Before the Mayor (Sir Charles Philipps, Bart), Messrs T. L. James, T. James, J. Rees, and C. P., Saunders. STRAY ANIMALS. Mary Whelton, of Portfield, was charged with allowing her horse and mule to stray on the Dale Road on the 27th of last month. Defendant pleaded guilty, and was fined Is and costs. ANNOYING THE SALVATION ARMY. Frederick Ellis, who did not appear, was charged with being drunk and disorderly on the 27th ult. P.S. Phillips stated that at 8.20 p.m., he found the defendant almost helplessly drunk in the Castle Square. He was shouting and swearing behind the Salvation Army. With assistance the officer took him home. The Mayor asked if this was the first offence. The Magistrate's Clerk He was fined in July last for a similar offence. The Mayor then read a letter to his brother magistrates from the defendant. Fined 2s 6d and costs, or 14 days. DRUNK IN CHARGE. Benjamin John, farmer, was charged with being drunk in charge of a horse and cart, and with using obscene language. P.O. Cousins stated that about 10 p.m., on the 22nd ult., he saw defendant in Perrott's Road, riding in a spring cart. He was very drunk with the reins under the horse's feet. There was a large crowd of people, and his language was most disgraceful. It was continued for half-an-hour, and was not fit to be repeated in Court. The Mayor The last time he was before the magis- trates was in 1895. Supt. Francis That is the last here, but I believe he is pretty well known here. The Mayor said they regarded the charge as very serious as accidents might have occurred. Fined 30s with costs for being drunk, and 10s and costs for the bad language. WITHDRAWN. Henry Williams, of the Rifleman Inn, was charged with keeping open his premises for the sale of intoxica- ting liquors during prohibited hours. Supt. Francis said he had sent a notice to defendant, stating that in consequence of the death of his wife last Friday, he should withdraw the charge. The Magistrates' Clerk: Did his wife supply the ale ? Supt. Francis She did, and I beg to withdraw it. An assault case in which Wm. Davies and John Moss, Jun., had summoned each other for assault was, on the application of Mr Colin Rees Davies, also withdrawn, both desiring to settle the case amicably out of court. Mr W. J. Jones said he appeared for Messrs S. B. Sketch & Co., who desired to withdraw the case against Thomas Elson Williams for selling two bottles of lemonade with a false trade mark. Defendant had tendered his apology, and undertaken to pay the costs. Bearing in mind too, that he had been in ill-health for a considerable time, they asked for the case to be with- drawn. This was also granted. The case of Sarah Jenkins v. Thomas Jenkins—an application under the Married Women's Act-was struck out of the list, Supt. Francis stating that the parties were now living together. MOTHER AND SON. Morris Whelton, who did not appear, was charged with using threatening language to his mother, Mary Whelton, at Portfield. The mother said she did not wish to press the case against him. Only let him clear from her house. He was 22 years of age, and she did not think he should be there to annoy her with his drunken habits after having to keep him, as he would not work. The Mayor You must tell him you won't have him in, and if he does come in, send for a policeman against him. The case was adjourned for a month. LICENSING EXTENSION. I On the application of Mr Morgan, the Bench granted I an extension of the license of the Market Cellars from 11 to 1 a.m. for the 13th inst., on the occasion of the foot- ball club supper and smoking concert. LICENSING PROSECUTIONS. I William James, landlord of the Horse & Groom public house, Prendergast, was charged with keeping open his licensed premises during prohibited hours, and Hannah Bowen was charged with aiding and abetting. Mr W. J. Jones appeared for the defence. P.C. Davies stated that on Sunday, the 28th ult., at about five minutes to nine, in company with P.C Llewellyn he concealed himself just opposite the Horse & Groom. At nine o'clock he saw two men coming from the private house occupied by Alfred Bowen, adjoining the Horse & Groom. One of the men was William Richards, of Prendergast, who had it seemed to him a bottle in his right hand pocket. The other man he did not know. At five minutes past nine a little girl came down Prendergast and knocked at Bowen's door. Mrs Bowen came to the door, and the girl handed her a small white jug. Then Mrs Bowen went and knocked at the public house door, which was opened by someone from the inside. Mrs Bowen handed the jug to the one who opened the door. He did not see who it was. The door was then closed, Mrs Bowen remaining on the doorstep for about two minutes. Defendant (to witness): You are a liar. Supt. Francis (to the Bench): Defendant has openly called the witness a liar. The Magistrates' Clerk (to defendant) You must hold your tongue. The Mayor (to defendant) It is a very serious thing for any person in court to intimidate a witness, and we shall have to deal with that in a different way alto- gether. Witness, continuing, said the jug was handed back to Mrs Bowen, who handed it to the little girl. He could not tell if there was anything in the jug. At ten minutes past nine a little girl came up Prendergast. She went and knocked at Mrs Bowen's door. Mrs Bowen opened the door, came outside, and he saw the girl handing something to Mrs Bowen, who went again and knocked at the public house door. The door was opened from the inside, and he saw Mrs Bowen handing to the one that opened the door. The door was closed, and Mrs Bowen remained on the doorstep for a couple of minutes. Then the door of the public house was again opened, and he saw the party handing something out to Mrs Bowen. He could not say what it was, as he could only see the arm. Mrs Bowen then passed what she had received to the little girl, and after Mrs Bowen had gone into her house the little girl came down the street towards Haverford- west. When she was opposite the place to where he was concealed he went out to her. She had a bottle in her hand, which she gave him. He produced it, and it con- tained brandy. From a statement she made to him he went back to the public house. He knocked at the door, which was opened by the landlord. He went inside an d saw several members of the family. In the presence of them all he asked the landlord which of those in the house had sold that bottle of brandy. He answered Nobody in this house; that bottle did not come from here at all." Witness then said Well, if I saw this bottle come from this house I did not see what was right." He then left the premises. The name of the little girl was Emily Parry, daughter of Thomas Parry, labourer, of Prender- gast. Her age was about 14. The Mayor Is she here. Supt. Francis: No, sir. « Mr Jones: You are prosecuting, and it is for you to produce her. Witness, in cross-examination by Mr Jones, said he was concealed in the corner of the schoolyard, and saw what happened between the railings. He left about twelve minutes past nine. The girl Parry was not summoned by them to appear there. P.C. Llewellyn corroborated, with the exception that he did not go into the public house. Mr Jones, for the defence, said that case was brought before the Court with a certain amount of premeditation and pre-conceived ideas on the part of the prosecutors, as they went for the express purpose of endeavouring to detect some offence against the law The only real evidence was that of the girl Parry. She went to Mrs Bowen, whose husband was a nephew of the landlord, and she said she wanted 4d. worth of brandy for her mother who was ill. The mother was ill from recent confinement. This was known to Mrs Bowen, and she got the brandy for the girl. Thus it was an excusable occasion, and he invited them to say that the sale was justifiable under the circumstances. Hannah Bowen stated that she was coming out of the house to go into next door when the little girl asked her for the brandy for her mother. There was no secrecy about it in the least. The only girl she saw was the girl Parry. She did not take a i ug from anybody. She had been for a walk and had only lust come in. Cross-examined by Supt. Francis Mrs James supplied her with the brandy. When P.C. Davies went into the house he did not see Mrs James. She did not see Thomas Richards there. It was quite moonlight P.C. Davies I did not see Mrs James there. Thomas Parry, father of the girl Emily Parry, said his wife was suffering from the effects of confinement, and he told her to send for some brandy. His wife had been complaining all the afternoon, and on the Tuesday the doctor was sent for. At this point Supt. Francis ascertained that the girl Parry was in court, and said he would call her as a witness. Mr Jones objected, considering it a most unfair pro- cedure. The magistrates consulted, and the Mayor said they had decided to hear what the witness had to say. Emily Parry said her father sent her for the brandy and she went to the Horse & Groom, but saw Mrs Bowen in the doorway. She gave her the bottle and 4d, and told her she wanted some brandy, because her mother was ill. On her way back the policeman came to her. Supt. Francis What did you tell him ? Mr Jones I object to that, as it is not evidence. Supt. Francis contended that he had the right to put the question. The Magistrates Clerk said the Bench could allow him to put the question if they thought fit. Mr Jones: The Bench will not allow the rules of evidence to be violated. The Magistrates Clerk It is in the rules of evidence. Mr Jones: I entirely contradict you. Witness then added that she told the policeman her mother was ill, and the brandy was for her. Supt. Francis said they had been charged with premeditation in that case, and- Mr Jones intervened, and said Supt. Francis had no right to address the Bench. Supt. Francis said he had a perfect right to do so. Mr Jones He is not an advocate, and he can't do it. Supt. Francis: I can, and will contest that point with you. Mr Jones: All right; I am sure you are wrong. The Magistrates retired for half-an-hour. The Mayor, on their return, said they had carefully considered the case, and had come to the conclusion to give a small penalty of 5s and costs, and no endorsement. Hannah Bowen would have to pay 2s 6d without costs for aiding and abetting. [The Mayor did not adjudicate in the following case.] Robert Butler Thomas, of the Mill Inn public house, was charged with selling beer during prohibited hours. Mr W. Davies George defended. P.C. Davies Before I go on with this evidence I wish to state that during the last six or seven Sundays there have been a large number of men drinking beer down on the Massh, and in Scotchwells, and on the Scotchwells walk. Mr George objected to any such statement. The Magistrates Clerk (to Supt. Francis) Can you connect this with the case ? Supt. Francis I am afraid not directly. The Magistrates' Clerk (to Witness) You must go on with the evidence then. P.C. Davies then stated that on Sunday the 21st, he was with P.C. Llewellyn, and they concealed themselves. James Smith, David Thomas, William Richards, and Frederick Dennis met Tom Smith on Cartlett Bridge at 7.20. They all went over towards the Marsh. At 7.29 Tom Smith came up from the Marsh, and saw George, a man employed by Mr Thomas, working in the yard. He heard Smith shout to George Come up to the big doors," which were closed. George went, and had a conversation with Smith. George went back into the public house, remained about two minutes, came out again, and spoke to Smith at the big doors, where he had been waiting while George was inside. Smith then went back in the direction of Cartlett Bridge. There he met the four men that went down the Marsh with him. Smith said to them It's no use yet," laughing at the same time. Then the four men went towards the Salu- tation Square, and Tom Smith went down to his house on the Marsh. At 9.30 Mr Thomas went out of his house into the garden and gathered beans until 9.55 a.m. As he was coming out from the garden door he met George Phillips, the butcher, and Frederick Dennis in the street. He had a conversation with them for about two minutes. He then went into his own house, Phillips standing by the big doors, and Dennis going as far as Cartlett Bridge. Dennis turned back, and both went towards the Salutation Square. At one minute past ten Dennis came back and had a conversation with Mr Thomas on the front door for about one minute. At eight minutes past ten Tom Smith came from Cartlett Bridge, and Mr Thomas had a conversation with him for about three minutes. Mr Thomas then went back to the Mill Inn. At 10.33 Mr Thomas came out from the big doors and went up Cambrian Place. A minute after Tom Smith came from the Salutation Square. At the same time Mr Thomas came out of the big doors, and conversed with Smith until 10.38. At this time Mrs Thomas came back from Cambrian Place. She and Mr Thomas went into the house through the yard. At the same time he saw Tom Smith give the signal to someone in the Salutation Square with his hand, as if directing them to go over to the Scotchwells. Tom Smith also went in that direction himself. At 10.44 the front door of the Mill Inn was opened. A young woman came out first, then Mrs Thomas came out, and then another young woman after. In that order they went across the street into the garden, through the garden path, and out at the door that leads to Scotchwells, the Mill Lane. Mrs Thomas was carrying in her left hand a bundle that seemed like a jar with a. cloth placed round it, and tied up at the neck. He could see portions of the jar between portions where it was tied on the neck. He then shifted his position, and went and looked on the outside of the garden, that was in the lane. He there saw Tom Smith coming from the door that Mrs Thomas was at, carrying the jar with the cloth about it. Smith carried it as far as the Mill gates. He then handed it to Arthur Rees, the chemist, who put the jar under the side of his jacket. In company with John Reed they went over the Scotch- wells. Fred Dennis, and George Phillips, the butcher, went on about 20 yards in front of them. Tom Smith then went up the steps into Rodney's house, where he remained about two minutes, and came out to follow the rest. Witness and P.C. Llewellyn went after them. They found them sitting on the grass about 300 yards form the mill. When about 30 yards from them he saw Fredrick Dennis drinking beer out of a glass. On going a little nearer they were seen and recognised. Dennis then tried to conceal the jar, and passed the glass that he was drinking to Tom Smith, who put it in his pocket. Witness went up and examined the jar, which was about a two gallon one, with a cloth placed round it, I and tied up at the neck. It was the same jar as Mrs Thomas carried out of her house and handed to Tom Smith. He looked inside the jar, and it was about half to three parts full of beer. He felt the glass inside Tom Smith's pocket, and left. Cross-examined: He did not suggest that anything was supplied to the men through the front door or the big doors during the conversation. They were concealed in a house with two windows about 40 yards from Cartlett Bridge. Mrs Thomas did carry the jar into the garden, and she was not fastening her gloves, as she had the jar in her left hand. P.C. Llewellyn corroborated. P.S. Parry deposed that in consequence of complaints he watched the house. With the aid of the glasses produced he saw Mrs Thomas leave the house distinctly carrying a bundle. ea Mr George urged in defence that the jar was not taken out of the premises of the Mill Inn on the Sunday, but on the Saturday night by a customer who did not take it home, but put it into the garden. Smith asked Mr Thomas for the key of the garden, and the beer was taken from the garden. Mr Thomas did not know until he was told that the beer had been left in the garden the previous night. The garden was not a portion of the licensed premises. Defendant was called. He stated that the garden referred to was opposite the licensed premises, and the license did not extend to it. On Saturday night the 20th ult., a bargain was made for a. jar of beer, which was taken away from his premises. He learned next morning that it had been taken away from his garden, where it had been left. Some of the evidence of the policemen was true, but a lot of it was wrong. He did not supply anybody with drink that day. He was going out, and the horse and trap was ready in the yard. He did not know anything of the jar until told by his wife. His wife was fully dressed, and there were two girls with her when she went into the garden. She was not carrying anything whatever. It was an utter lie. His wife opened the door, and the jar of beer was covered with potato stalks between two rows of beans. Cross-examined by Supt. Francis: A man-of-war's man came into the house and was refused a glass of beer on account of his bad language on Saturday night. There was a disturbance. He was ejected. The front door was closed, and the sailor hit him in the eye and his niece also. He volunteered to give a jar of beer to the men who helped them, and Tom Smith was to take it into his custody. They were there until eleven o'clock, and they took the jar away. He did not know that they put it into the garden. When he went into the garden he did not know the jar was there. He heard nothing about the jar until his wife told him. He could not say whether the cloth was put about the jar on Saturday night, or whether he had had the jar back. John Reed stated that he was at the Mill Inn on the Saturday night, but he did not see the jar packed up, and he could not say it was removed on the Saturday night from the Mill Inn. The magistrates retired, and after a lengthy absence they said they considered the case proved. There would be a fine of 5s and costs, with no endorsement of the license.

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