GOOD HEALTH WITHOUT DRUGS.|1898-09-07|Haverfordwest and Milford Haven Telegraph and General Weekly Reporter for the Counties of Pembroke Cardigan Carmarthen Glamorgan and the Rest of South Wales - Welsh Newspapers Online
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Haverfordwest Petty Sessions.

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I "BETWEEN YOU AND ME."

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LANGUM.I

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I - APPROACHING EVENTS -

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GOOD HEALTH WITHOUT DRUGS.

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The Batte of Omdurman. GALLANT CHARGE OF THE LANCERS. (Continued from Page 4). There has been such a pressure of daily work that the great incident of the battle of Omdurman has probably received less attention than it merited. This was the famous charge of the 21st Lancers against enormous odds. Colonel Martin's orders were to present the broken enemy from returning to Omdurman, five miles away from the field of battle. The 21st Lancers unexpectedly came upon the enemy's reserves, who were 2,000 strong, but whose exact strength could not be ascertained owing to tho nature of the ground. The cavalry were then in column of troops. They deployed into line for the attack and charged. When they were within 30 yards of the enemy, they found the latter, who had been ensconced in a nullah, and had been concealed by a de- pression of the ground, wild with excitement, coming on to attack. The Lancers had not a single moment for hesitation. They charged gallantly home, the brunt of the business faMing on No. 2 squadron, who absolutely had to hack their way through the enemy twenty deep, exposed as they were to the withering infantry fire. They struggled through, but every man who fell was immediately hacked to pieces by the swords of the frantic foe. The men of the British Cavalry rallied, bleeding and blown, on the far sides clothe lanes which they had cut for themselves in the enemy s ranks, and with admirable fortitude they reformed as cooly as if they had been on parade. One corporal who was covered with blood and reeling in his saddle when ordered to fall out, shouted, waving his bent lance, "Never, form up No. 2," meaning his squadron. Then it was that young Greenfell was missed for the first time. Lieut. de Mentmorency, with Corporal Swar- back, dashed out to effect, if possible, the rescue of his body. They were immediately joined by Capt. Kenna. With their revolver fire the two officers kept the enemy 40 yards away, and would have secured Lieutenant Greenfell's body, if the horse upon which it was placed had not shied with its burden. Then seeing that a second charge would be futile, Colonel Martin dismounted his mend with magazine and carbine fire drove the enemy steadily back into the zone of the Anglo-Egyptian infantry fire, the Lancers having accomplished their object by covering the enemy's line of retirement, though at the cost of heavy casualties. This maiden charge of the 21st Lancers is regarded as an extremely brilliant affair.-Reut/'I"S Spl'cial Service. According to official despatches, 25 British and 21 Egyptians were killed, and 99 British and 230 Egyptians were wounded. THE KHALIFA. Abdullah bin Sayen Mohammed, the Khalifa, was the eldest son of a religious man and teacher of the Koran, called Et Taki. He was a wild youth, and gave his father much trouble by his slowness at learning his prayers. He was made prisoner in one of the combats with Zobehr Pacha, and narrowly escaped being shot. He made a pilgrimage afterwards to the Mahdi, and took the oath to him. He became in turn the Mahdi's principal adviser, and was specially protected against intrigues by the issue of the Mahdi's proclamation requiring his followers to obey him in all respects as the Mahdi's agent carrying out the will of the Prophet. The Mahdi on his deathbed named him as his successor appointed by the Prophet and the Mahdi's tomb, about which so much ie heard to-day, was erected by him. The fiendish character of the man furnishes Colonel Slatin with many thrilling pages in his book, Fire and Sword in the Soudan." "During the life-time of the I Mahdi," says Colonel Slatin, "he was entirely responsible for the severity of the proceedings enacted in his name. It was Abdullah who gave the order for no quarter at the storming of Khartoum, and it was he who subsequently authorised the wholesale massacre of the men, women, and children. After the fall of that city it was he, for the period of four days, declared the whole was he, for the period of four da ?;h,'n distributing the Sharga tribe to be outlaws. when distributing the captured woman and children, he was utterly regardless of their feelings. To separate children from their mothers and to make their reunion practically impossible by scattering them amongst different tribes was his principal delight. Without the smallest rhyme or reason he has caused the deaths of thousands of innocent people."

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