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- -.-Runaway Horses at Milford…

A LOCAL CHAMPION SCULLER.…

Haverfordwest Petty Sessions.

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I Milford Docks Company.

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"—=--Neyland -Parish -Council.

I "BETWEEN YOU AND ME."

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"BETWEEN YOU AND ME." Speculation is already rife as to who will be the next Mayor. If Sir Charles Philipps were asked to fill the office for a second year this action would receive cordial and general agreement. None will deny that his election has oonferred distinction and dignity upon the town, while there is an equal concensus of opinion that he has discharged his duties with much zeal and devotion, and that his conspicuous abilities have brought Haver- fordwest into prominence in various ways. All who know anything of public work, and his colleagues on the Council in particular, will thoroughly endorse what I have said. And if the burgesses had to make the choice I am confident there would be a unanimous desire for Sir Charles to be the chief magistrate for another year. He is in every way entitled to the honour. # Hereabouts we have been following the candidature of Mr Owen Philipps, brother of Mr Wynford Philipps, M.P., at Darlington, with an interest accentuated not only by his local connections, but by the gallant fight he made in the Montgomery District at the last general election against Major Price- Jones. At Darlington he has, if anything, much more difficult work. The seat has always been dominated bv the Pease familv. -¡ which, although Quaker, has of recent years become quite Tory in political views. Mr Pike Pease, the second son of the late Unionist member, is the Liberal- Unionist-Tory candi- date, and the tremendous religious and commercial influence of the family will be at his back, notwithstanding that he will be without the commanding personality of his father in the contest. Sir Theodore Fry, who for so many years repelled the attacks upon the Radical citadel of Darlington, was not available for this election on account of the state of his health, caused by the injuries sustained by a runaway horse some time ago on the Continent, and the recent death of Lady Fry. Hence Mr Owen Philipps' selection by the Liberal Four Hundred to champion the cause, and I am confident they will have no reason to regret their choice. The Unionist majority in 1895 was 657. Local farmers have long suffered uncom- plainingly, and gradually the police are waking up to the fact that the tramps and gipsies which infest our country roads do considerable damage to crops, and have become an unmitigated nuisance. Their number is legion, and their depredations, like their number, increase in volume. The modus operandi of the gipsies consists in camping on private ground or disused quarries, so that the police are unable to touch them, and besides their petty pilfering they light fires, and allow their cattle to stray anywhere for a cheap feed. When remon- strated with by the tenant they become abusive, and will not obey any order to leave, except their own will or pleasure. If a few of these wandering Nomads were brought before the justices and exemplary sentences imposed we should have less trouble with them, but the police assert that the farmers generally are afraid to interfere, so great is the revengeful feeling in this class. Unless therefore, the police act alone it is likely that the farmers will still have to suffer. There is another feature of this tramp nuisance that we suffer from in the towns. I do not think there is any town in the Prin- cipality which has so many of these parasites within its borders as Haverfordwest, and they run riot, working their own sweet will to the annoyance of respectable people, in the most deliberate manner, never failing in that portion of their programme which consists of insulting by their vile language all who do not give them money. They and their objectionable ways are with you at every turn in the streets, and their next resort is your house. Many times during a day householders declare that they are called from their duties by men, women, and children, who, if you do not choose to supply their wants roundly insult, and sometimes threaten. Some tramps adopt the stand and deliver method until your servants are frightened into giving alms to appease their anger; others whine apologetically until you dis- appoint them with a refusal, and then you are surprised at their vigorous attitudes and sanguinary language. Such people scorn work, and make our lives a nuisance by their impecunious importunity. It is high time our police realised their duties, and did something to relieve us from these pests. The Mayor as chief magistrate would be doing excellent service if he would insist upon some efforts being made in this direction. Judge Bishop seems to be in favour of strikes. Perhaps he has seen their efficacy. A man was summoned in the Haverfordwest County Court, and he advised him to strike for higher wages as engine driver, increased payment for lighting the Milford lamps, and a lower rented house. This was because the man pleaded that out of 15s. a week as engine driver, and 9s. as lamp lighter, he could not pay 6s. 6d. a week rent, and keep a wife and family, without getting into debt. I confess to a feeling of sympathy with this victim of low wages, but instead of a recom- mendation to strike-making matters now bad much worseâretrenchment and economy would have been better advice. When is a dog ferocious ? It is not easy to say. The law does not help you, and experts differ. Judge Bishop settled it in an action for a dog bite at the County Court. Our canine friend is allowed by law to bite a person once, but this dog at Crundale left his teeth marks on two persons, and attacked one of these a second time. This was sufficient, according to the Judge, to decide the debatable point, and the owner had to pay. Even at the sacrifice of a few rabbits-and this dog's great forte was as a rabbiter-the owner, if he is wise, will get one less snappish. 'Tis sweet to hear the watch- dog's honest bark," but it is not nearly so agreeable to pay for his bites. Some of the Judge's interpolations in the case, which he followed with the keenest interest, were both witty and amusing. The assertion that the sanitary condition of Milford is quite as satisfactory as any town in Pembrokeshire I must take cum grano salts. My scepticism is founded upon actual experience and supported by what appeared in the Telegraph a few weeks ago. The Chairman when he made this pronouncement at the District Council was anxious to make the best of matters, but reading between the lines of a few of the statements at the meeting it is evident matters are not so rosy, and that there is need for improvement. As far as I can judge the circumstances it is for the Sanitary Committee to assert themselves, and I sincerely hope they will do it. If from a financial point of view the town is unable yet awhile to voluntarily undertake a complete scheme of drainage, this surely does not prohibit smaller matters being accom- plished, and owners of property must assist or take the consequences. The demands are reasonable, and conceived for the general good of the inhabitants. Selfish money interests ought always to be secondary to the continued good health of the people. On sanitary affairs Milford must reform. THE INVETERATE GOSSIP. BASS' ALE. I INJUNCTION AGAINST PUBLICANS. t OTHER ALES SOLD AS BASS'. In the Dublin Courts on Friday, Judge Kenny, on the application of Bass, Ratcliff, and Gretton, Limited, granted perpetual injunctions, with costs, against two Belfast licensed victuallers to restrain them from passing off as Bass' ale draught beer brewed by other brewers.â The Judge, in giving his decision, remarked that the fraud was a gross and palpable one.

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