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ABERAVON. I

BRITONFERRY.I

BRYN.

CWMAVON.I

DYFFRYN. I

.GLYN-NEATH.I

LLANSAMLET.I

., 'IT.I ";'.".-NEATIT.

! NEATH ABBEY.I

I PORT TALBOT.I

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I PORT TALBOT. I The shipping- at the Port Talbot Docks for the firet week of 1916, i>otwithstand- ing tho bad weather whiea prevented several &1Ãpe putting to cea, chowcd the ..üht.ia, tonnage ùLól,öH tons. This ?,w^s made up of 47,636 tons exports and 4,191 tons imports, an increase of 19,717 tons as compared with the corresponding week of last year. In addition to the high tonnage there were in dock on Saturday 37 vesseJ The Rev. J. T. Rhys, addressing a meet- ing of the Guild at the English Congrega- tional Chnreh, Port Talbot, on Tuesday night, said that he was an impanitent bc- liever in Prohibition, and bdieved thd Prohibition would do far more than Oon- scription to bring the war to a successful end. But neither in peace por in war time was Prohibition possible in this country, mainly because of the vested in- terests in the liquor traffic. A pamphlet had recently be211 sent him and some other ministers entitled Why leave the straight road ? It was the report of an address by Mr. lief. Jones, M.P., President of the United Kingdom Alliance, and urged tempenvnee reform ers not to deviate from the policy of Prohibition, and deprecated turning to the Fide rol of State jtuix-hase of the liquor traffic. Mr. Rhys said there were tircws in politics whe-i it was impos- sible to ti-avel the straight road, just M in the army a frontal attack would be madness. Wisdom dictated then that we shoul-d try and reach our destination by a bye-road. The born -ertrateprist, when he realised tlfe futility of a frontal attack, ordered a flank movement. The straight road to Prohibition ra absolutely blocked. There was no hope of getting through. History showed, nothing more clearly than that the vested interests we-rp too many and too formidable for temper- ance reformers. Vested interests were our Gallipoli, and the sooner we realised that the better for the tempeirnce cause and for the nation. The longest way round war, Bomefcunew th# quickest- and surest wAy home, and so in order to attain Prohibi- tion hf Tii-c-cd that wo f.laojdd travel by the way of â State purchase. Mr. TJayd George had brought this withm fche range of practiealpolitie-q. It was uPPOI'h:d by m-en of all parties, and so j'úúd a chance of passing. The foremost leaders of the Temperance movement, men like Mr. Arthur Sherwell. Sir Thomas Whittaker, Mr..Topfnh Rowntree, Sir Joaeph Comp- ton Riekett, and Canon H<uslisyf all entbusiapfic the policy. To oppose ikis policy was to grant :1 new h'tuv. of life, to -the drink tiafnc in this land.

--- cp-SKEWEN.I

[No title]

OMNIBUS NOTES I

OROCEiS' ASSOCIATION | GROGERS'…

LADY'S WIG AID GOwN. I

-! TAKEN mm IN A GARROW.I

'- --'- -7=-NOSTROLINEI

:LOGAL POLICE COURTS! i —I…

CIMLA.j

Li^eAmsirrcigys DEATH I

SCUMS SPEECH RESTORED. j

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