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I uEMPTY AND INSINCERE." -40

f- i ? NEARLY EIGHTY | MILLIONS'

I I DEAD MAN FLYING. I

LATE MR. JNO. ROBERTS, J.P.I

SHOOTINC AT SKETTY.

I .TOOK THE JbKE SERIOUSLY.…

RHONDDA AND SWANSEA BAYI .-..…

VITAL- LINK.I

-1918 u NATIONAL M -I

PATIENTS DEFEAT j NURSES.…

HEAD IN GAS OVEN. I

I .ON THE MIDLAND.

.LSKETTY VOLUNTEER BAND.

Is CA N D IN A VIA N GOVERNMENTS…

I 1impEN-DING BREAK." I

iiABT EDITOR OF THE ' STANDARD."…

MUST DO MORE ONI LAND. !

PRIVATE TO COLONEL.

!BAD START -IN LIFE.

-.-SCENE --IN -COURT.

çÂEÁf fLOO6S UP NdtiTH.

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r SCOTTISH WOMAN < SOLDIER…

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SCOTTISH WOMAN < SOLDIER WOUNDED WITH THE SERBS. MANGLED BY BULGAR BOMB. 111 a clean and comfortable bed. amidst; comfortable and quiet surroundings, lies comely, mother-looking little lady. Her bed is in the nurses' ward of Militaiy Hcs- pital, Camp No. 41. Macedonia, and.the! little lady is a vatient-the tõnly patient of her sex in a camp that has accommoda- tion for 1,600 sick or wounded Serbian men. A few days ago a Royal Aide-de-Camp came to her bedside, and, on behalf of the Prince Regent of Serbia, pinned to her breast, with much ceremonial, the goid and silver Cross of Kara-Georgeâa rare badge that is given for cons; i juous bravery on the field of battle. The whole right side i.f her body, from the shoulder to the knee, was lately a mass of Tern flesh and shattered bene -tlie work of a Bulgarian hand-bomb that chanced upon hev as she was helping the Serbs to clear out an enemy t:?och. JJut now it is healing as satisfactoiily as am surgeon could wish. Miss Flora, Sand.âthat is the little lady s nameâis Scotswoman. Working in Serbia as a hospital nurse since early hi the pre- sent world-war. her sympathy so keenly aioused by the sufferings and heroism of the people that, when the hospital units we;.? broken up during the great ret rent of Octo- ber-November. 1915, she joliciteci and obtained permission to enlist as a private in thp 1 earguard that protected the v. ith- drawai of the retve-ting army. Before the army reached the Adriatic shore she had woji promotion. Become Sergeant Sands, she stood high in the regard oi both oiffcers and men of the cra« k regiment to which she still belong s. On the Macedonian front she went through the wboie^of the arduous and uecétul offer:j-'ive campaign that began on Sei'tembcr i2. ¡ Over the Tsra. It was in the. decisive ash«:,H on tht highest c.ftsf of Id:" a-ti\c i-areer was t-emp^'rariiy cut snort. ikw thi happened let her rekie in her own words 'We had I'eevi t >i>ucbii:g jll em fh¡¿1>\ pits for houi's. Wiitior jjnpatiefii'y fc.r ;.he of; der to attaci: It was snowing, and ertp .v lay the ground. r w»: ,u: (,f tn. pit in ).¡à j¡ ¡t';l:'ëGl\L ¡,¡cII'Vi!' King as fast as my legs could move-. I -am j always the firet. to leave cover. It is my 'duty a lici-soniii!isjoic/ico offk'er. Put. i unfortunately, 1 ;iltl iriy ine. So it happens that I am generally among the last to ro<h an enemy trench. i Well. had uiarly }â¢(â¢:⢠'/bed the brink of the | Bulgarian trench in â which our men were a lready at snps v.-jth the defenders. I was 1 one of a, small group of laggard s--perhaps half s dozenâwhen a well-aimed grenade fell ift our midst. A couple of befides 1 myself were in the radius of its explosion lId fell wounded, but 1 seem to have got most of the. scatter. "Yes. the shock wa.? awful. YMluout think 1 lost consciousness for more than a lfiitjat c,. Nlid 1 was not left long untend- cs d. A yuung officer of my battalion had seen nie, diop. He d iip. towards me on all fours over the snow, and, seizing my | hands, pulled me over its smooth surface to kthe -belter of the rock. "Ye*, the torture of beii.a Dragged by the hand of my broken arm was acute. 1 et it was not very much greater than what I had already been suffer- ing. It had to he brmle, siid the strain was soon Over. Wonderfully doft, iiid teiidei- art, Ssrbiau soldiers in dressing wounds on the field. A co 11 pie of the hl. men of my own company, did me up i? t!i? quid:st time imaginable, and I was goon ]ll1g on a stretcher un ItJy way to the uMrest field bos- ?pit?." time, tO it6;t1 t-?m?t'?'. Thà 3?' Sb'T?"2S' .of them. Mttd- <.? ?t-\?o !'?Hnt?'? hate;ei'to-5 be exhaled. But the ?arge?tis t<'U her she may rMy the- Ije. of her i injured. limbs. She yields to rnne of her fellow-I)at-ionts in hospital in impatience to return to the fight.

: "RELIGIOUS DUTY."

1 WAMHtPS 6? TH? FUTURE. ;

HAle A FIELD-MARSHAL.

CAUSE ANI) EFFECT.

iPRINTERS, FARMERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS,

OUlk OPTItAlgTS. '* '■

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