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UNDER HEAVY SHELL FIRE.I

FOG IN SWANSEA.

SIR A. MARKHAirS WILL.

THE MOTHER OF SIXTEEN.

i TO-DAYS NEWS I

A FIFTH WAR LOAN? I

I PRISONERS OH JJ-BOAT I

&wi Il. , ,t." ,\'

TO-DA Y'S NEWS IN BRIEFI

FLORAL "AT HOME." t -I

LOST IN THE FOG. I

BIG STEAMER ON FIRE. j

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-__- -THE BRITISH VICTORY

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THE BRITISH VICTORY Strong German Fortresses Fall HAIG STRIKES A BIG BLOW. I. Copyright. Specially prepared by c, Geographia," Ltd., 55, Fleet-street, London, E.C. There are some points rn the British pietory on Monday which were cleared ep in the communique issued on Tuesday. It will be observed that Sir Douglas Haig's evening dispatch does not mention the capture of Beaumont Hamel, although a message from the War Correspondents' Hea,dqua.f ocrarse a message oen- cored by the militaryâdeclares that it has been taken. The French commentator pimply says that the village of Beau- mont Hamel is, in its turn, menaced." To-day's message, however, states that the yillag-e has been taken. SIR DOUGLAS HAIG'S DISPATCH. General Headquarters, France, Monday, 10.10 p.m.âWc- attacked this morning astride the River Ancre, and have suc-j cooded in penetrating the German de- fences on a front of nearly five miles. The strongly fortified village of St Pierre Diviosi has fallen into our hands. The attack was delivered before day- light in a thick mist. Severe looses haw been inflicted on the enemy. Over 3,300 prisoners have paeeed through our collecting stations already, and more are coming in. Fighting continues. The front which has been captured jjorth of the Ancre consists of the German original front-line defence trenches of an exceptional strength. THE WAR CORRESPONDENTS'| MESSAGE. The joint message of the war correspon- dents is as follows: War Correspondents' Headquarters, Nov. 13, 3.20 p.m.âWe attacked early this morning, and have already advanced the i British line on both sidos of the Ancre to t maximum depth of a mile, capturing the villages Beaumont Hamel, considered by the German impregnable, and St. Pierre Divion; aiao valuable trenches north qf Setre. All these positions are part of the heavily fortified original German main line, which they have occupied more than two years. There are many prisoners; 2,000 have already been collected in the advanced cages." Fighting continues around Serre, which was the only place not captured at the first assault. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE I VICTORY. The expert French commentator, whose I exposition of the victory reached us on Tuesday, is particularly illuminating upon the signifioanoe of the victory. The British, he says, attacked on a front of a dozen kilometres, north and south of the Ancro, particularly between Conime- court and Thiepval. It will be remem- bered that, in the first days of the offen- sive action on the Somme, the British troops had already directed an effort north of the valley of the Ancre as far as Com- meoourt, and afterwards limited it to the westeW part oi the sector from the Ancre to the Somate. Monday's operation thus indicates an important extension of the I zone in vilkich the British troops &re fight- ing. It was. nkovwvez, senciered necessary by the fact tbM the progressive advfjioe of our Albes on the rJght of their sector raade the oatliake of their portion rather unfavourable- Their line, in fact, forced a right angle, of which one side ran, from north to soutji, from Gonunecourtâwhich its occupied py the Germansâto Hamel, a I gma.ll hamlet 09 the right bank of the I Ancre; and the other side ran, from west I to east, with Thiepval, Couroelette, Le | Sars, Ga-andoooart, and Les Beaufs as íts I landmarks- ) ALL day fighting. I It -mas, important to reduce ? sabent tha? formed by the German pMit? in the BritMh front. Our AIIL attached thear tmk n?h xmalaiiaa. div»~ I garding the inclemency of the weather, i They hurled themselves to the in a thick fog, and, some. time before dawn, I the struggle was proceeding fiercely. The ) ground whi-ch had to he conquered was I. formidably fortified. Nevertheless by the evening, after a day of almost unÃllter- i rupted fighting, the British troops had realised a general advance, on h front of eight kilometres, and had liberated the little village of St. Pierre Divion, situated on, tlit, left bank of the Ancre, about a kilometre west of Thiepval. The struggle still continues, and it seems that the village of Beaumont Hamel is, in its turn, menaced. The British have thus made the most important pro- gress, and ev/en more (important than might be judged from the calculated re- straint of the communique, for they are careful only to announce results which are oonnrmed. Moreover, the number of; prisoners already counted is 3,300. The heavy German losses bear witness to the vigour of the assault delivered by our Allies, and prove the complete success of the attack, which ought t4 have a bene- ficial effect on subsequent operations, j I THE GROUND OF BATTLE. St. Pierre Divion. aouth of the Ancre, and Beaumont-Ham el and Serre, north of the Ancre. run north-by-west in the order named, between Thiepval and Hebuterne, and were all included in the British line of attack when the joint Allied offensive was launched on the ( morning of July 1 on a front extending Ii from Gommecourt, north of Hebuterne, to Fay, south of the Somme. DIFFICULT COUNTRY. I Though the attack north of the Ancre j did not result in permanent gains such as those which have crowned our arms 1 south of the river, the story of what was done there in the fir-ot days of the offen- &ive is such that, when it is fully told, Great Britain, as the Times Special Correspondent at British Headquarters said as early a? July 5, may perhaps be leven prouder of th? det?ds of &ome of the regiments which fought on this g?ection of the front and which achieved th. some things of plain impossibility than of the successes further south. All the region by Serre and Beaupiont- Harnel to Thiepval is extremely difficult âa country of spelling ridge and inter- vening valley, the dominating points being roughly at. or in the immediate neighbourhood of, these three places. Each was a position of great natural strength, and in the nearly two years during which they had been held by the Germans each had been fortified, both on and below the ground, until the enemy seemed to have justification for hie boast that they were impregnable. THE RUSH OF JULY 1. Yet in the first rush of July 1 some of our troops actually penetrated into and beyond Thiepval. Territorials actu- ally reached and, for a time held Serre. and other contingents fought through and over the successive German trenches of the first-Line system till they were on the highest point of the plateau between Serre and Beauinout-ElameL These ob- jectives were reached about an hour or an hour and a half after the attack was begun. But, in spite of the utmost gallantry, oar men oould not retain their hold on Serre or complete it on Beaumont-Hamel, whom they held positions on both r!,idea Qf the village. THE STRATEGIC IMPORTANCE The etrategie importance of this fresh blow at the German line (says one mili- tary writer), rests upon the increased strain which it imposes just at the very moment when the German High Com- maaid is trying to aesape together every regiment it can spare from France for the attack on Rumania, and for active j ofrations against the RuwAaiis. Although thesft battles cost tike British Army the tivee if many gailaait infantry soldiers, xet there iajto ottkec war mdming. the j German strength and of preventing Hin- denburg from profiting by his central position to attack the Allies one at a time. Tactically it is clearly demon- strated that in this c.ontemporary fortress warfare, the attacking artillery must, batter the breach, and, to use the old phrase, must make it practicable before it i6 of uso to launch the infantry as- sault. Artillery and infantry, too, must learn to fight in intimate oo-operation. THE PESSIMISTS. I We trust that this brilliant achieve- ment will silence the pessimism in writ- ng and in talk which has lately been pre- valent in some quarters (says The Times "). None of it is justified, and while some of it must be attributed to petty personal intrigue, more perhaps is due to the inordinate vanity of certain talkers and writers. These persons, whose acquaintance with military affairs is at the best the knowledge of amateurs and theorists, seem to fancy that they are greater masters of strategy than our highly trained professional soldiers. If the intrigue stood alone it might, per- haps, be ignored, for its authors are known and discredited. But it derives some semblance of plausibility from the fanciful schemes of armchair Napoleons who advocate the flinging of vayt armies to anywhere and everywhere except the one point where the pick of the German Army are being slowly but surely driven to their knees. THE 6.30." Gives Swansea News of the Victory. The 6.30 Leader" on Monday night gave exclusively the war correspondents' [ message dispatched at 3.20 that afternoon from the front, recording details of the British success. The air raid on Ostend was also exclu- sively reported in the 6.38 Leader."

BURRYPORT MILK SUPPLY. I

AT THE TRIBUNALS.I

-STEE4. OR MEN? I

NO -WARNING. I

FOLLOWING GERMANY._____I

IN THE POLISH LANGUAGE.!

IAIR RAID ON CAIRO. :

] BOMBS ON OSTEND. I

WHIST FOR THE WOUNDED.I

/'BRAVE AND CHIVALROUS."I