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- IN BRUSSELS.

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IN BRUSSELS. O M TRAINS OF GERMAN DEAD. BAVARIAN TROOPS ARE ON THtiR PRUSSIAN COLLEAGUES. INTERESTING NARRATIVE -.N-or-b,crn France, DecemL-pr Bel- gian gentleman, a resident of Brussels, liter a most adventurous journey, was recently able to get through from that city, which he left on November 2S last. He gives a long account of the then conditions of the in the Belgian capital to fhe "Tele-,ramme. du Pas-de-Calais,' or which fhe folio wing extracts appear in the "Daily Tel(-,graph" Life in Brussels daily becomes more and more gloomy. It is true that the cafes are open till ten o'clock, and there are even a few picture palaces still going. Hut, on the other hand, tfco Germans are daily becoming more exacting. For the ,.F,ight,est ofience against any of their hundred and one bye-laws, which onlj the most retentive memory can recollect, a fine of 200f. is impend or a term of six months' imprisonment. The want of provisions does not at present make itself much felt, although there is only grey-black bread to be had at 40 centimes the kilo. Coal is beginning to arrive in the town, and provisions snch as cheese, eggs, butter, milk, and eren preserved herrings and a few live beasts, are making t bei r way into JHrussels from Holland, ria Maastricht. Concessions in Railway Fares. Railway communication with Germany is regular and constant. The authorities have even made a fPdnction of 50 per cent, in the rharges for fares iii, the eases f! of those Belgians who wish to visit their wounded or imprisoned relatives in Gel -1 many. It is also generally believed that the enemy are making use of these lines tor sending provisions in large quantities â through to various part.; of Germany. Railway passenger traffic was only inter- rupted for five days, and this, of course, was owing to the transportation of reserves to the front, and the removing of wounded and exhausted troops from Bel. 11m. The fresh troops arriving from Germany ,ire on the whole very well equipped. The; men look very young, and amongst the^e now troops it is easy to distinguish a. few vdder men in oddly made-up uniforms, who arp evidently those who have I-)"ni wounded and are returning to the front. Hospitals Full cf Wounded. All British and French civilians are prisoners. It is a fact that the former are not treated half ItS well as the latter. All the h\ita15 are full of wounded, 85 per ceut* of whom are Germans, the remaining 15 per cent. being made up of British, Frer.ch, and Belgians. The hatred exhibited by the Germans and even the medical authorities towards the British is really remarkable. As for the cases that prove fatal in the hospitals, the percentage is not large. At Ixelles, a suburb of Brussels, where ail those who succumb to their wounds are buried, in the space of ten days eighty-eight Allies were interred, while 661 deaths, occurred amongst the German wounded. After the battl" of the I-scr twenty-seven goods trains full of German dead passed through Brussels and were taken on to the neighbourhood of Xamur, where they were cremated in huge fur- naces. Air-craft Arrangements. One of the sights of Brussel s now is to watch the movements of the, three captive balloons, the famous 'Draohen Ballonen.' These are formed in the shape of a cigar, The Brnxellois have named them les boudins." Or. Nov. lo.during a storm, th<> cablMi of two of these balloons were ⢠smashed, and the aeronauts were taken ofr in a northerly direction. The next day these two were- replaced, and the Germans again were in possession of their points of .,b5ervation. With regard to Zeppelins'" a hanger for dirigibles already existed on thoj manoeuvre ground at Tlett-')rbec.k. Th, Germans, who, usual, had thought; everything ont beforehand, immediately1! on their arrival in Brussels on Aug. 23, j began upon the work of enlarging the j hangar with materials they had brought; wi tb theilf. and in two days had, lengthened it by 43 yards. The enemy have also put up work s hebind the hangar for the production of hydrogen. Close to I the cemetery of Ixelles and at the Chateau. d'Eau they have put up specially con- structed mac hi ungues for use against! aeroplanes. Prussians and Bavarians. It is quite true that there was a tight be- tween Prussian and Bavarian troops in Brussels. A quarrel arose on the subject 8f the Qoeen of the Belgians, who is held in great respect by the troops of the lat- ter country. The Prussians made some insulting remarks about; her Majesty which go incensed- the Bavarians that they opened fire upon their companions in arms, and a fight ensued which was with great difficulty subdued. The Bavar- ;:in. wre severely pwnished, several of them being taken out and shot for insub- There are actually 12t.000 German troops in Brussels- They all belong to the Land- wehr and La11d-turm. There are, on the ")/rer hand, a vast number of German ivi'lions who have lived for years in Bel- gium. and in Brussels in particular. These latter do the police work. In the Farly days of the German occupation, hat is to say, from abwit August 2-1 or 25, up to the end of September, the. invaders Jpd lives of considerable luxury upon the T-mey stolen during their march on the capital and their exactions upon Brussels, vow they have been obliged to lead ptieter lives; money is no longer plenti- ful. and. consequently, there are far fewer orgies. Lead" Requisitioned." As for the German army in Belgium, it is short of horses, transport, and winter clothing. There is also a great scarcity of zinc, lead, and copper. All â¢'ir pliee of theso commodities are im- mediately reqiAritioned." In the. vil- lages which are still left shrnding the leaden gutters are torn from the bo"5fs, ¡I no every piece of zinc or copper found carefully collected and despatched to Germany. At present the German population of â russels have still every hope of ulti- mate victory over the Allies, and their oificial notices, which are placarded pro- fusely all over the town, are couched in the most high-sounding and arrogant terms. However, a marked difference in the tone of their announcements hM become noticeable. Their 4t ccim- rnnniques" as to the progress of hostili- ties have Income laconic, and are con- fined to such statements as. Slight ad- vance in such and such a direction," An attack of the Allies repulsed," or There is nothing to report."

NO RAGING TO-DAY I

SWANSEA-OR BLACKBURN?I

MORE BORDERERS WOUNDED.I

I.LP. CONFERENCE. I

CULTIVATION OF DANDELIONS.…

MORRISTON TROOPER A PRISONER.…

NAVAL RESERVE DIVISION. I

MTJSIOAL suoorss. j

í "KILLED BY GERMANS"

SUNKEN TUG RAISED.

NEVER LEFT THE JAIL.

GERMAN, POSITIONS BROKEN THROUGH.

CHAPLAIN VISITS PRISONERS.

. SHIPPING NEWS. I

MR. PERCY ILLINGWORTH.

[_ iPROMOTED FROM RANKS

I DANUBE BRIDCE DESTROYED.-

1 BOOM IN RECRUITING.

ICHANCELLOR RETURNS TO LONDON.

I SPIES EXPELLED FROM jWlI

IPROPHECY FULFILLED.

I____NOTICE TO A READER.

I SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SERVICE.

| WHERE WE CAN lArD '

I FOR POOR ACTORSI 1 ——0——

I TOMMY THE CENTLEMAN i

I FLOODS IN ESSEX.

j WHY DOES A CORN RESEMBLE…

I _MIDNIGHT MASS IN RHEIMS]

IT., L N PLOTTER CAUGHT.

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