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A SPLENDID STAND i » i…

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A SPLENDID STAND  » j ALLIES' DOCCED DEFIANCE. 4friMAN SOLDIERS SHOT BY 6FFICEBS '¡ WHEN FORCED TO RETIRE' DISPATCH FROM THE FRONT. The Press Bureau issues the following: descriptive account which has been! communicated by an eye-witness .present j with the General Headquarters, and continues and supplements t'n- narra- tive published yesterday of the '.rtove-J mswts of the British Force and the! French Armies in immediate touch with it with it. November 1st. Friday, October 30th. witnessed the re- newal of the, efforts against our right, but without success to the enemy. In the centre the bombardment was heavy. In- deed, so many shells fell round our posi- tions that the telephone wires were fro-, quently cut. The attack in the direction of Ypn's generally was renewed. South-oast of that town it was pressed in great force, and in places our line was again forced back a s hort distance, but on our left the oncoming Germans were stopped by our entanglements under close rifle tire, and after two efforts to advance gave way. On Saturday, Oct. elst, the most deter mined attack was made upon our left and left centre, the pressure being specially severe against our centre. The enemy did not advance against our right. They were not nearly so active as farther north. So far. with the assistance of tin: Ftouch, who ha^e been co-operating most effec- tively, we have succeeded in maintaining our line and in retaining possession of I Yprps. upon the capture of which by the end of October the Germans had set their heart. Desperate Fighting. As may have been gathered, the fighting of the past the days has been of the most desperate nature. It has been eminently a soldier's battle, and, without exaggera- tion. or any undue self-c.ongratulation, it can be 'aid that our men have behaved splendidly. In the face of heavy odds and against the repeated onslaughts of great masses, continually replaced by fresh men, and backed by the a lmost continuous fire of an immense concentration of guns, they- have, by their dogged resistance, well upheld the reputation of our army. Heavy as have been our lossls, we have <:iken far heavier toll from the enemy, and han' prevented them gmning the ohjpd upon which a)l ?heir energies hare been concentrated. Not oiil our troops have maintained their traditions, our French allies havej been fighting with all the dash for which they are famous, and from all accounts] at Dixmude and at Donga, Yser they made a name for themselves which willj never die. The Belgian Army bus likewise re-1 pitied the furious onslaughts of the enemy with the utmost gallantry. German Soldier's Statement. I The German troops also, have won our respect for the way in which they have advanced. Whether it be due to patriot- ism or the fear induced by an iron dis-  cipline. the fact remains that they have steadily pressed on to what in many case", must obviously "have been certain death. That they are sometimes forced to go is shown by the following answer to an interrogation put to- a wounded prisoner. "1 belong to â Company ofâth Regi-I ment ot Division of the -th Corns. Ii was embodied in October, 1913, on mobi-j lisation. The weakly and those backward in training to the number of about 60 per company were withdrawn from the active regiment to form the nucleus of a reserve regiment, which was completed by Badeners and Wurteinbergers belonging to the second ban o fthe Landweir. We re- ceived new field grey uniforms, and after ten weeks of hard training we travelled1 for three day? and two nights from I Thuringia up to Achial (1). where we rp.1 mained in reserve. We were told oii i- nearest enemies were the English. On I October 17th and the next day we per-j forme d such fatiguing forced niai-elies that many men fell out on the road. On October 19th we each received 285 rounds of ammunition, and had Ollr first I' taste of fire. Altlioligli we were told there were only franc tireurs in front of us, I saw French cavalrymen and no other foes. From this day onwards the battle was un- interrupted. On the (lth my section re- ceived orders to go forward to atta("k ami the oSicers warned us that if we ?ave way 1ire would bo opened upon us from behind. Shot from Behind. "This threat was carried into dTpct I when the losses we suffered compelled us to retire. Indeed, it was by a German bullet that 1 was wounded. Having fallen i on the ground, I remained between the! lin?vithout food or care for two days, at? Ow end of which I dragged myself to all ruined house. "During the wh?f of this time the| (,'PTDIan whi?--li were short, were! faUin? about mv shpl?r, some IJ\lDdrer!8¡i ni na;es from the French l'nes these hav- ing advanced. On October 21th I mysAlfl moved forward. called out, to a passing patrol and surrc-p-dered. We have received no distribution of food since our arrival iii France. The commandant of my company was a reserve lieutenant, 28 years of age; the colonel, whose name I don't know, also belonged to the resrve, as did all other officers of the regiment. The officers told us if we fell into tb hands of the French we should be sent to the Foreign Legion, and certainly should be massaered by Moroccans. I only saw one man shot. He was a priest, who they Faid was a spy." Result nf Inundation. The results of the inundation to the north of Dixmude have been observed by I our aviators. who have seen numbers of the enemy corrected in groups on the d3rkes which iiiterseet the flooded area where, ac wording to report, some of the German gCeniinged at Jøqt. of next tÃlp).

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ANOTHER RUSSIAN j SUCCESS.…

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,TO-DAY'S WAR 1 NOTES.

A SPLENDID STAND i » i…