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THE ELECTION CAMPAIGN.

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Llandiio Rural DistrictI Council.…

Our Poultry Column.I

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Our Poultry Column. I The question of utility poultry must of necessity mean anything which can be counted as producing something quickly which is marketable. So many people talk of utility and hardly know what they mean, and when they ask which is the best breed for utility they cannot explain what they mean to imply the word. Some look upon it as being only egg production, yet surely it can apply to all parts which can easily be turned into profit. Well then, the quickest way of picking up money is to produce table birds, for when properly fed the birds can be sold at 16 weeks, thus being less than five months from the shell, and you cannot raise many pullets to lay in this time. Let us take it then that either table or egg producers will be entitled to the term utility. Now surely, the best under this heading must be a fowl which will answer both pur- poses that is, for eggs and good for table birds. There are several useful fowls which would con": under this heading, some of which my reaaers may know well. One could easily reckon the Rhode Island Red as being of this class, for the pullets are good layers, and give a nice coloured egg, while all the cockerels can be sold off early or left to make good big roasting joints. The only drawback to them is their yellow leg and skin, which does not sell so easily from the bench, but this prejudice is being over- come, and the cooks are finding that when cooked the colour of the skin is of no con- sideration. Another breed of the heavy type which would make a good utility bird is the Light Sussex, and some would prefer this to the Red. The white skin and lag is a good point if it only means a more ready sale, while the flesh is of first-class quality, and plenty of it when properly fed. The best shape for utility of either of these would be the nearest to the ideal bird for exhibition, because both need a long back and deep chest, which in all points is needed for typical birds, whether for show or common use. To these add a wide back, and you have the essential points which make an ideal bird. Many of the best strains of exhibition stock prove the best for eggs, while they must certainly be good for table, owing to th? length and breadth of breast. In either of these the breeder could follow show points and yet combine utility, because the two go hand in hand. There are some high- class strains of Light Sussex about which have made egg records to equal any of the Leg- horn family if the winter six months are ?orii fam ly 'I'heii there is the Wyandotte, which would meet the need of an all-round man. It is best to have on any farm one sitting breed!. for should, an incubator and foster-mother be used, it is not always necessary to keep these going when one hen would be enough. In the Wyandotte you can find the best mother of the lot, and when hatching they are so patient and careful that it is seldom that either an egg or chicken gets crushed. As a rule they will protect their' chicks from ant vermin, and soon, notice the' approach of trouble. Though not big, they can cover a good nest of eggs, and if good will hatch the lot out. Here again the skin is yellow, and though on the small side they can easily be got up to 5 lbs. in weight, and then find a ready sale. Some of the pullets have even beaten the laying records of the Leghorn, and being more docile and quiet, are more suited to the need of the small farmer or cottager who has rather limited space. One great variety is the White Leghorn, and is kept for egg production only, the sur- plus stock not being much use for table and at no age can they be said to be worth a roast. All the spare cockerels are best cleared off when about eight weeks old, be- cause they only take up room, and the extra food consumed is not repaid in the little extra value which one can make. When keeping these for eggs only, have the smallest type in both Wyandottes and Leghorns, for they will lay double the number of eggs than those of the exhibition type and size, and eat a lot less food.

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Mining Matters.

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SERIOUS ACCIDENT AT AMMANFORD…

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