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AMMANFORD. I

BRYNANTMAN.__I

I CAERBRYN. I

rCROSS HANDS. A

CWMAMMAN.-I

GORSLAS. --- I

GWAUN-CAE-GURWEN. I

LLANDILO. I

MANORDEILO. I

TOWYN'S SELECTION.I

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Church of England Waifs' &…

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Church of England Waifs' & Strays' Society On Sunday last, the Rev. D. Maldwyn Davies, M.A., clerical organising secretary of the above Society for Wales, preached a striking sermon at All Saints' Church. The service was of a thanksgiving character, being that in use by order of the Archbishop of Canterbury throughout the Church on that day. Mr. Davies based his remarks on Abraham planting a grove, and described the act as one of absolute selfishness, since the planter did not hope to benefit. Planting trees was not a hobby, but a matter of vital importance. We had been depending for the past four years on the trees planted by out forefathers. Trees were not only useful, but ornamental, and added great pleasure to life and beauty to a landscape. So with children. What would the Empire do without strong healthy children? Our own country, the richest in the world, proved to have more rejected as physically unfit than any of the belligerents. Most of them through the squalor of slums had to face the battle of life terribly handicapped. The conscience of the nation had to be roused, but, as with siavery and education, the Church must de the pioneer work and care for the saplings in the meantime. Not only were children useful to the nation, they were the very life of it, and the nation must sacrifice of its best to give every child a proper chance in life. There were over 90,000 child deaths per annum under one year old. Hundreds of thousands of soldiers' children were orphaned by the war. The work had passed beyond being a work of benevolence and a matter for th3 charitable. It was of vital national interest. Such work had the Church of England Waifs' and Strays' Society been doing for the past 36 years. In that period it had rescued and given a start in life to over 23,000 children, but what was that compared with the hun- dreds of thousands who had gone under? Sir Edward Niciiol, of Cardiff, had lately offered £ 25,000 fcr the erection of three Homes at Cardiff on three conditions:-{1) No religious tct or qualification for admission to the Home; (2) that a free site be provided; (3) that an endowment of £ 20,000 be raised. He was glad to say a site of three acres had been given by Lord Tredegar, and he had now between receipts and promises over il6,000 towards the £ 20,000 needed.