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THE PICTURE PALACE. «I

Family Notices

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LEDBURY WOMEN'S LIBERAL -ASSOCIATION.

I LEDBURY HUNT PUPPY SHOW.

INOTICE TO FARMERS IN THE…

HOLLY BUSH. !

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DEATH AND FUNERAL OF MRS.…

WOMAN'S SUICIDE NEARI LEDBURY.

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C.L.B. TEA AND CONCERT. I

CANON-FFROME.

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I LEDBURY HUNT PUPPY SHOW.

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everything a man could do to raise the standard of the Ledbury Hunt in every way. (Applause.) He was most particularly attentive to the hounds, which were the first consideration a Master had to have. They had all done their best to second him in the way of walking puppies, and he hoped they would continue to do so for many seasons. One thing struck him more than anything in his old age and that was the great improvement in the Ledbury Hunt in the last sixty years. It had reached the pinnacle of fame by having at the head of affairs a man who spared so expense and who managed the country in the way it ought to be managed. (Applause.) He congratulated Sir George on having the advantage of having the very best judge of foxhounds in England, he might say in the world. (Applause.) He hoped the lord Duke would allow him to say that ever since his earliest days-he was blooded in his country about 100 years agoâ(laughter)âhe had taken the greatest interest in the Beaufort Hunt, although he lived too wide to follow it. In his earlier days he was a frequent visitor to Paris, and he heard the lord Duke's father talking to a Frenchman about the qualities of hounds and what they would do and not do. The Duke said that his dog hounds would hunt anything and kill anything. The Frenchman said they would not kill a wolf. Fifty years ago, the question was settled. The Duke took 20 couples of hounds over to France to a part invested by wolves. What happened was that when the hounds went out they got into a wood where there were wolves, and they would not look at them. The fact was that the Duke's hounds were too highly bredâthey were all right for a fox, but they would not go after nasty, stinking wolves. However, the Dake stayed there with his hounds and hunted wolves, and won his bet, but came back a wiser man. He (Mr Deane) was invited to be of the party, but could not go, as he was in Belgium at the time, although he ordered a pair of wolf-hunting boots. He gave them the health of the Duke of Beaufort, Mr Gerald Hardy and Mr George Sturman, who had been so kind as to come and judge the merits of the Ledbury hounds. (Applause.) The Duke of Beaufort, in returning thanks, said he had listened to Mr Deane's story and he must correct it. After three weeks hunting they only found three wolves. After they got two French hounds in the pack they had a good 20-mile point and ought to have killed their wolf, but he beat them. If they had had more time he had no doubt they would have killed a wolf. To turn to that day's proceedings this was the third time he had come to judge the Ledbury entry, and every year he saw a great improvement in the whole pack. If there were a few more Rugby sales the pack would improve by leaps and bounds. The dog entry was a very nice one, but distemper had played the very mischief with the ladies' side of it, but what there were were very nice. Last year he prophesied that their bitch, Waitress, would beat his at Reigate and he was a true prophet. He was going to try and beat her this week. He thaaked them very much for tke way they had received the toast. (Applause.) Mr George Sturman said it was always a great honour to him to judge with the Duke of Beaufort and Mr Hardy, for there were not two better judges in England. They ought to know hounds if khey didn't, but he was quite-. sure they did. The entrý to-day was not up to the entry of last year, but there were some very promising hounds indeed. The dogs were better than the bitches, but he hoped they would hear more about the first prize dog and bitch at Reigate and Peterboro'. Personally he would like to see both the Duke of Beaufort and Sir George win, but they might have a bit of a tussle with them from the Heythrop. (Laughter.) He was glad Sir George had im- ported into the Ledbury Kennels a bit of Heythrop blood, and although he (the speaker) drafted them he would be pleased to have them back. He hoped they would da as well for the Ledbury as the sire and dam did for the Heythrop. There was no doubt Batchelor had a nice lot of puppies to go out shortly. (Applause). THE MASTER. I Colonel Henry gave the toast of the Master, Sir George Bullough. (Applause.) They all knew Sir George so well and liked him so much that it required very few words from him. They knew how anxious he was to show good sport, and they knew what good sport he had shown despite certain drawbacks like bad scent and sickness at the kennels. They knew what a good huntsman he had in Batchelor, and they all knew how everything was done top-hole. Therefore there was nothing more to say except that he hoped Sir George Bnllough would long remain Master of the Ledbury Hounds. (Applause. ) The toast was accorded musical honours and cheers, which were renewed for Lady Bullough and Miss Bullough. Sir George, in response, thanked the cbmpany most heartily. He assured them "hat it was very encouraging and gratifying to kao.w that, from the way they received the toast, they looked on them as their friends, not only from a sporting point of view, but from a country point of view as well. (Hear, hear and applause.) He sincerely hoped and trusted that they would be always able to look upon them as such whether they got good scent or bad. He thanked them most heartily. (Applause.) The prizes were then distribubed by Lady Bullough, after which an adjournment was made to inspect the litters of puppies.