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LEDBURY POLICE. I

Children's Court.

LOCAL LAW SUIT.

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ILEDBURY URBAN COUNCIL

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ODDFELLOWS' PRESENTATION AT…

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ODDFELLOWS' PRESENTATION AT BOSBURY. I Mr William Green's 30 Years Secretaryship. On Tuesday evening last the members of the Bishop Swinfield" Lodge of Oddfellows, M. U., gathered in strong force at their lodge room, the old oak room at the Crown Hotel, Bosbury, for tha purpose of doing honour to their permanent secretary, Mr Wm Green, who has held the office for about 30 years. To mark the com- pletion of such a lengthy period of faithful service, the brethren presented him with a handsome oil-painting of himself, suitably framed, to be hung in the lodge-room, a roll-top desk and a purse of gold. Attached to the frame of the oil-painting was the following inscription :â" William Green, presented by the brothers of the Bishop Swinfield Lodge of Oddfellows, M. U., March, 1914." Major Mynors, formerly of Bosbury House, came over from his Radnorshire residence to preside over a very good gathering, which included Mrs Buck and Miss Beith, Bros W S Lane, A Cotton, E W Turner, R Drew, J Miller, Matthews, J Turner, J Millington, W Shuck, A G Parmee, J Clissett, F Farmer, F Foster, W Clissett, W Green, W Baskerville, J Hill, Mr J K Job, and many others. The Chairman, in opening the proceedings, said they had assembled on a very pleasant and agreeable occasion, namely to make a presenta- tion to a gentleman who had been the secretary of the Bishop Swinfield Lodge for many years. He had just received a telegram from Bro Portlock, P.P.G. M., who was one of the head district officers for Herefordshire, to the effect that he was sorry he unable to attend, and wished health and happiness to P.P.G.M. Green and coupled it in friendship, love and truth. (Applause.) He also announced that P.P.G.M. E. H Hopkins, Prov C.S. was unable to attend. Continuing, Major Mynors said it was now his privilege on behalf of the subscribers to present Mr Green with the purse of gold and a roll-top desk and to uftveil the portrait, which he hoped would be permanently hung in that room. He might say that they had recognised the abilities of Mr Green, and the great care and interest which he had taken in the work of that lodge. (Applause.) He took pn the duties over 3D years ago and he was glad to see so many gentlemen present there that night who were members at the time the lodge started. Every year a few members dropped out and joined the great majority. He hoped that when an old member dropped out the younger ones in that pariah would step in. (Hear, hear.} It was his privilege about 1888; to present and unveil the portrait of the late Mr Gardiner, the former secretary of the lodge, which hung at the end of that room. Since then, he was sorry to say, with the exception of Mr Green and him- self, all the other officers of the lodge had passed away. He hoped the successor would carry out the duties of the lodge as the old secretary had done. They had accumulated a large amount of funds,, and he felt sure that that lodge was one of the wealthiest in the district or perhaps in the County. (Applause.) That was due to the way in which the funds had been managed and from the small beginnings it was no small matter to have accumulated £ 6^000. He hoped the lodge would continue in the future as it had done in the past. (Applause.) The benefits of the lodge were many men in their declining years were able to live in apparent comfort, and he doubted whether any lodge had done as much for its members as their lodge had. He hoped that Mr Green would live many more years longer to do the duties of that lodge. Mr Green had the details of ehe lodge so much at his fingers end that it would be indeed difficult to find a better man. (Loud applause.) Major Mynors then unveiled the portrait and presented Mr Green with the purse of gold and the roll top desk, amidst the cheers of his brother Oddfellows. Major Mynors added that he felt sure the presents would be useful to Mr Green in hia capacity as secretaJy of that lodge. He asked them to drink to his health, and wished him success as secretary of that lodge. (Cheers and applause. ) Mr Green, in response, said he was very much obliged to the Chairman for coming all the miles he had to maka the presentation, and he also thanked the ladies and the whole of his brother Oddfellows. He hoped they would go on with the lodge in the way they had, though it was a very trying time for him, as the duties of secretary were no ligh-t task. They had accurululated a, lot of money and met all their demands in a straightforward manner, and they, as old members, were proud of doing so, but they did not want State interference. (Hear, hear.) He thanked them again for the handsome presents they had given himâthe desk would soon be full of literature and documents from the insurance committee. (Laughter.) He was very pleased that his portrait should be hung in that fine old oak room. (Applause.) He did not expect to see it there when he joined the lodge, when he was just turned 18. He went on to speak of the advantages of Oddfellowship and said that it improved the public made better husbands of the members, and better farmers. He referred to the Boy Scout move- ment in Bosbury, and said they would make good Oddfellows, because they were taught to look after themselves and to help their fellow men. Years ago they had to pay 15s to be initiated into the lodge, but Bro. Gardiner got among his fellow farmers, who contributed over 2200 so that members could join free. Old members of 65 had their contributions paid. Now their funds were being exhausted instead of being pulled up owing to the State work; and they could not ask gentlemen who themselves had to pay contributions to contribute to their funds. He thanked the Committee who had worked hard in bringing these presentations about, and he also thanked Mr Parmee (treasurer) and Mr E W Turner (secretary of the committee.) (Cheers and loud applause.) Mr Wm Lane, who was greeted with applause, said that he was an old Oddfellow, and was treasurer of the Lodge for over 25 years. A very great responsibility rested upon the shoulders of Mr Green and to a certain extent on himself. He hoped that Mr Green would continue to be amongst them for many years to come. (Hear, hear). Everyone of them owed Mr Green a debt of gratitude for carrying out the duties of the lodge in such a straightforward manner. Mr Green had helped many of them present financially. (Hear, hear). He hoped they would all persevere like Mr Green had. Of course they could not all get to the top of the tree, but it would improve the true im- mensely. Major Mynors had told them that Wm Green had been secretary of the lodge for 30 years, and it was also a great thing to say that he had only missed one lodge night. Mr Green and the late Mr Gardiner had built up that lodge to the position it was in now. As time went on many left the lodge, and it was his time now, but he hoped that it would be a long time before anyone followed him. (Ap- plause). He proposed the health of the worthy Chairman, and said that it was not the first time he had performed a similar ceremony. (Laughter). Major Mynors was always ready to do anything for the people of Bosbury, and he also put himself to the inconvenience of coming there that night. They had a great many troubles at times, but Major Mynors was always ready to smooth matters over indeed he was a peacemaker. (Applause). The Chairman's health was drunk with musical honours. In response, the Chairman thanked them for drinking his health, for net by any means the first time. If that room could only speak it would tell them of the many interesting meet- ings that had taken place in that old historic room. He did not think that it had been put to a better use than on that occasion. (Hear, hear). He considered that presentation and the one to Mr Gardiner as the most important meetings oc that lodge that he had ever been present at (Applause). He suggested that various p1 tes should be put in the church, bearing t' a names of the officers of the churoh. It would bo a very interesting memorial. He would be very glad to assist in the matter. He hoped the officers of the lodge would go on in the same way as they had in the past. They would see to the distribution of the funds in the same manner as had been done in the past. He felt sure that their present officers would be able to hold their own. (Applause). H&- thanked them very much for the cordial manner in which they had welcomed him. (Loiid applause). Bro Parmee said the main part of the work had ben done by Bro W Turner, but he (the speaker) had been able to assist and the Com- mittee had also done their share in the matter. (Hear, hear.) He thought the room would not. be complete without the portrait of Major Mynors. He would also want Mr Lane's, and if he started to want he was sure to get it. (Laughter.) The lodge had subscribed wonder- fully well and they got well over 220, and he wished them to understand he was very glad of the result of it. He thanked the subscribers very heartily. Bro Turner (secretary) said there had been some rather hard work in the thing which he undertook, but he had been greatly helped by Bro Clissett and the Committee very willingly. There were 244 brethren who had subscribed â : towards that presentation out of 300. He had received a letter from a Bro. Oddfellow at Bradford who sent his best wishes to them. The health of the visitors was proposed by Bro Parmee, who coupled with it the name of Mr J K Job, who briefly responded. Bro A Cotton proposed the health of the Vice-Chairman (Bro W S Lane), which waa drunk with musical honours, and Mr Lane responded, mentioning the efficiency produced by boys joining the boy scouts. A good programme of harmony was contri- buted by the following members:âBros J J Clissett, F Farmer, W Shuck, F Foster, W Clissett, W Green, W Baskerville, J Hill, W Wood, and Mr J K Job. The singing of the National Anthem concluded a most enjoyable evening.

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ISTAIN ER'S "CRUCIFIXION."

LETTEBS TO THE EDITOR. I

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