Hide Articles List

14 articles on this Page

The Week at Home and Abroad

! I GREATER SAFETYIX MINESi1…

News
Cite
Share

I GREATER SAFETYIX MINESi1 I ⢠J MINERS' AGENT AND UNNECESSARY DANGERS In his monthly report to the delegate meeting of the Rhonda District of the S.W.M. Federation on Monday, Mr D. Watts Morgan, agent, outlined the re- commendations the Federation would probably place before the Government in respect of greater safety in mines. Mr Morgan stated that a great deal of time had been taken up in dealing with ways and means for securing greater safety, and a list of suggestions had been drawn up for submission to a conference of miners of the South Wales Coalfield to be held in Cardiff on Monday next. The proposals included the question of the construction of trams and main haul- age roads, stowing old workings and dis- used roads, the method* of timbering, and other safety precautions dealing with the roof. A very important matter for dis- cussion wa, the advisabality of changing, if possible, the safety lamps now in use for portable electrict lamps. He would welcome such a change, at least for the men engaged in main haul f;e roads and those who were continually in contact with trams, and that as far as possible the use, of the safety lamp should be dis- couraged. There might be a division of opinion on that point, but they would probably get an interesting discussion on the question of prohibiting altogether the use of {he present safety lamp under- ground. A good deal could be said on both sides, and strong reasons advanced in favour of the retention of the safety lamp for investigation and examination purpose6. "They were going to ask for legislation, making it compulsory that there should be a cessation of work in all working places and roads for at least six hours out ofevøry twenty-four." They all knew how necessary it was that there should be a period of total cessation so as to allow a. mine to cool down. The other suggestions wereâhaulage of coal to be entirely prohibited in return airways; endless rope haulage to be introduced wherever possible, and the speed of jour- neys to be limited between four and six miles an hour. They knew the speed some of them travelled, and heard them called "Flying Dutchman." It would also be necessary to find'out the cause of fire after an explosion. Commenting upon what he termed the failure of the national conference to establish a central fund for the purpose of maintaining the dependents cf those men killed at the collieries, he remarked that for some reason or other the coal- owners, not only of South Wales, but generally, had killed the idea. He did not knew whether they feared legislation would be sought to place the -mainten- ance of the widows and orphans as a burden upon the industry. The average number of deaths in the coal mining in- dustry for the last ten years wast 1,420, and the majority of these were the re- sult of single accidents. If the royalty owners were taxed to the extent of a half-penny per ton it would give them an income of 16600,000 a year. That would enable them to give in respect of single men £ 20 for burial a.nd other expenses, and for married men £10, and 5s. a week for the widow and 2s.6d. for each child. The amounts paid under the Com- pensation Act were by no means adequate to meet the requirements in the majority of cases, and he, therefore, thought the proper maintenance of the widows and orphans ought to be made a charge upon the industry. The delegates decided to bring the mat- ter before the notice of Parliament.

CANADIAN NEWS ITEMS -I

I"DO MIRACLES HAPPEN?" I

I. -QAIN TO, ORDER. I

IJUDGE AND COMPENSATION I

[No title]

Advertising

MINERS AND THE PREMIER _____I

—————— WELSH…

OUT OF WORK TRAGEDY

, m1 AMERICAN HUMOUR.I

"IN CAMERAI

Advertising