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BRIDGEND ANU BOARD OF GOARDIiHS.I

I ASK YOUR NEIGHBOUR.I

"WE ARE FIGHTING FOR LIFE."…

ICOURT COLMAN HOUdE. I

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COURT COLMAN HOUdE. I I PART 2. I I A Llewellyn Who Sailed With Collingwood, I I The Friend of Lord Nelson. I 1-1 (By Mr, T. í.1, PRICE, Late of BovÃrl.on). I Court Colman passed into the hands of the Llewellyn family about the year 1837. The purchaser was William Llewellyn, the grand- father of the late Mr. R. W. Llewellyn, J.P., and great-grandfather of Captain W. Herbert Clydvvvn Llewellyn, J.P., the present owner. The late Mr. William Llewellyn was the youngest son of Hopkin Llewellyn, of Brom- bil, Margam, and of Pentre, Rhondda Valley. Mr. William Llewellyn, who was a competent and qualified surgeon, was born in the year 1773. The following narrative is sufficiently curi- ous and interesting to be told. The story runs that when a small boy he was sent to a public school, and very soon after his arrival received a sound thrashing at the hands of the school bully a lad, who bore the name of Col- lingwood,-wbo is now famed in history as the intimate friend of Lord Nelson. Young Llewellyn took his severe thrashing quite courageously and manfully, and his plucky courage won the admiration of Collingwood, and from that time they became close com- panions and great friends. Eventually the older boy, Collingwood, left the school, tnd went to sea. Some years afterwards, when Mr. William Llewellyn had qualified as a sur- geon or doctor, his old schoolmate and friend, Collingwood, then a captain, wrote and asked him to become his shipi- surgeon. He ac- cepted the appointment which was offered him, and subsequently they saw many en- gagements together, both of them taking several prizes, and passed through many varied experiences, until Mr. Llewellyn was invalided home. Shortly before the great historic Battle of Trafalgar, October 21st, 1805, Collingwood again wrote to his old friend urging and imploring him, if suffi- ciently recovered, to rejoin his ship, but Mr. Llewellyn was unable to comply with this re- quest, and he never went to sea again. It is interesting to note that Collingwood's his- toric letter is still carefully preserved among the cherished possessions of the Llewellyn family. In the year 1818 William Llewellyn married the eldest daughter of Mr. Thomas Dumayne Place, of Glyn Leiros, Neath, and settled down or established their home in Glamorgan- shire. It was, however, late in the thirties that Court Colman was purchased by William Llewellyn, but, owing to the long litigation or law suit which ensued concerning the pro- perty, there was some considerable delay be- fore legal possession could be obtained, and in the year 1840 William Llewellyn passed away. His son and heir, William Llewellyn, who at that period was about 20 years of age, subsequently took up his residence at Court Colman House a year or two afterwards, and in 1844 married a Miss Knight, of Tythegston, and by her had a large family. In the year 1854 Mr. Wm. Llewellyn held the office of High Sheriff for the county of Glamorgan. He also played an active and prominent part in the formation of the Vol- unteer Force in Glamorganshire. He died in 1898, and was succeeded by his eldest son, the late Mr. R. W..Llewellyn, J.P., of Baglan Hall, near Port Talbot. RESTORATION AND RENOVATIONS OF I 1906 AND 1907. Very important in the history of Court Colman were the years 1906 and 1907, for during that period very considerable and ex- tensive alterations were carried out, greatly improving its residential qualities and out- lines. Previous to these alterations and re- storation the site now occupied by the east wing of the house and the conservatory were taken up by stables and out-buildings; while where the west wing is now erected was an old ruined building much out of repair, evidently a part of which was originally a portion of the old Tudor mansion ages ago. The greater part of the central portion of the present main front of the house existed prior to 1907, but the roof was then raised, and some addi-. tional windows were erected on the seoond storey, and the stables and old western wing of the house were demolished and additional wings were added at both the .eastern and western ends of the house, thus imparting to the main front the fine stately appearance which it has at the present time. During the alterations the old entrance porch was re- moved, and a new porch surmounted by a balustraded balcony was erected in its place. One interesting feature of this restoration was the erection of the old sundial over the front of the mansion, an old relic which had been lying unused for many years in one of the adjacent stables, and to the old inscrip- tion which it already bore, with the date 1766, Mr. R. W. Llewellyn very appropriately added a line indicating the date of the restor- ation and renovations, which were finally com- pleted in 1907. Most of the interior apartments of the house underwent very considerable changes and elaborate improvements, which will be re- ferred to presently. Since the death of Mr. R. W. Llewellyn, J.P., his widow, Mrs. Llewellyn, and other members of her family have resided at Baglan Hall, a picturesque mansion near Port Talbot. Court Colman is now the home of her eldest son, Captain W. Herbert Clydwyn Llewellyn, J.P., who at the moment is serving with his regiment, the gallant 24th, perhaps better known as the South Wales Borderers, a regi- ment with which he has been closely identified for a considerable period, and takes a special interest in. THE ENTRANCE HALL AND STAIRCASE. Although the fine Entrance Hall is not of very lofty dimensions, it is a spacious and comfortable apartment and the ceiling is beau- tifully decorated in an elaborate style gener- ally associated with the late Elizabethian plasterers, and the Tudor style. The walls of the entrance hall are-panelled to a height of about 7ft., the wood work terminating in a broad cornice, upon which are placed some dainty pieces of pewter and brass work. On the right-hand side of the apartment is a handsome fireplace of dark marble with large bronze figures. This is one o f the many beautiful treasures which were collected by the late Mr. R. W. Llewellyn, J.P., and Mrs. Llewellyn during their Continental visits some years ago. It may be mentioned that the late. Mr. Llewellyn had a natural instinctive taste for antique curios, etc. ,and was keen in his endeavours to secure many specimens of rare antiquity and value in accordance with his cultured tastes and individuality. The furniture of the hall includes some very an- tique furniture. In one corner are a couple of high-backed, quaint looking chairs of later Stuart days, while in another corner is a very antique oak gate-leg table, which lends a gra- tifying sense of homeliness to the cosy apart- ment. The grand staircase, which is made of teak wood, ascends in a broad flight of 16 steps, at the top of which it divides to right and left, and later rises in two more flights to the first floor. Half way up the stairs on the land- ing are a series of 4 small statues, placed in niches made specially for the purpose. These statues represent and are emblematic of the four seasons of the year. Many more inter- esting and notable curios, etc., may be ob- served in the entrance hall, on the staircsae, and in other apartments. THE LIBRARY, STUDY, AND DINING I ROOM. Another interesting apartment is the lib- rary, which stands on the Western side of the entrance hall. There are a large and very comprehensive collection of books, con- taining many volumes of historical works dealing with the Principality and other places of intere8t. From the Library an archway is constructed through a six-foot wall, leading to the study, which occupies a corner in the South-western part of the man- sion. In this apartment, as in many of the other rooms, are several interesting relics, including some ancient clocks of great value. It may be noted that the late Mr. R. W. Llewellyn took a keen interest in these, and accumulated quite a large collection of them. Returning or retracing our steps to the entrance hall, a doorway on the right-hand side of the staircase leads to the dining room, a commodious apartment, which, despite the fact that it has a Northern aspect and coxir- sequentlv little sunshine, is a pleasant and oosy apartment. Many notable paintings and portraits adorn the walls, including some valuable family portraits. Among them is a notable portrait of Mr. Wm. Llewellyn, the surgeon, (and friend of Collingwood), who is pourtrayed in a Naval dress uniform of about 80 or 90 years ago, and who it may be mentioned in passing, was until recent years remembered by some of the oldest inhabi- tants in the Baglan and Margam district and familiarly known as* the old doctor. Some other paintings in the dining room are of his wife and his son and daughter-in-law, the late Mr. and Mrs. William Llewellyn, grand- parents of the present owner. Other inter- esting portraits of the late Mr. R. W. Llew- ellyn, J.P., and Mrs. Llewellyn occupy a. position on the wall at the upper portion. of the staircase. I THE DRAWING ROOMS: INTERESTING FEATURES. I Occupying the whole of the Eastern end of the mansion is the spacious drawing room, which is one of the most beautifully decor- ated rooms in the house. It is oblong, and in every way a well proportioned apartment. Approaching it from. the entrance hall, you ave to pass through the smaller drawing room, and here may be observed a large china cabinet containing many choice and interesting specimens of the Swansea potter- ies and old Wedgwood china. Prior to the alterations, about nine years ago, this apart- ment formed the south-eastern extremity of the older structure. The large and commodious drawing room at Court Colman is a copy or imitation of a similar apartment at Versailles, in France, therefore, it is thoroughly characteristic of of the French Empire style. The decorative work was likewise executed by a French firm, and the fine plaster work is a triumph of the French decorative art, for though bright and flowery in colour it is highly artistic and possesses the qualities of lightness, grace and beauty. The general decorative scheme is in cream colour shade, and relieved with large decorative panels of vieux rose brocade. The line of the walls and ceiling is pleasingly broken by the appearance or presence rather more than half-way along the drawing room of fine pillars of African marble and from these a long archway crosses the room, and two pillars of smaller dimensions oonnect the pillars with the walls. On these handsome columns are elaborate capitals of Roman Ionic moulding, and the plaster work of the arches is very artistic, while over the nar- rower side arches are some very effective de- corated festoons. At the end of the room is a massive mantelpiece of white marble, upon which rest some large blue jars of rare old Delft. Some beautiful pictures adorn its walls, in- cluding one fine and exquisite copy of a Mad- onna, by Andra def Sarto. In the middle of the south end of the room stands a quaint and antique French clock,while some fine stat- uettes representing Victory and Narcissus, occupy both corners and near at hand is another elegant piece of statuary represent- ing Petrarch's "Laura." Almost every- thing in the room is in perfect harmony with the general decorations. The costly furni- ture is mostly of Louis period, in which gilt was de rigour, i.e., indispensable. A handsome side table of a distinctly French style, and on the other side of the room there is a Neut wrought cabinet containing Cer- amic (porcelain and earthenware treasures), old Delft, Cupa de Monte and old Swansea ware-the latter including one highly finished painted teapot in white and gold, with richly painted panels, containing artistic figures and flowers. In the corner to the right of the fire place, a decoration French screen at- tracts the eye, the panels of the upper part of which are of old types. In- many of the other various apartments of the house there is much beautiful furni- ture, including a notable suite in one of the bedrooms which is composed of some fine Ital- ian handiwork, inlaid in mother of pearl, copper, and brass. This valuable furniture is reputed to have occupied the place of hon- our in an Italion Palace in bygone days. All around the mansion there is distinct evi- dence of a cultured taste in the well laid out. grounds and gardens, which are graced by many varied beautiful vases and artistic pieces of sculpture, which were brought from Italy by the late Mr. R. W. Llewellyn, J.P., some years ago. These include a fine statue of Minerva, in Carrara marble, and the copy of the statue represents in size and design, a similar famous statue in the Uffize Art Gallery, in the City of Florence, Italy. A pretty drive leads from the terrace in front of the mansion, and winds down the hill to the main western entrance, where the ornamental lodge gates provide an unique ex- ample of old Italian work, in which the graoefu^ design and elegance of skilful work- manship and handiwork could scarcely be ex- celled.

DEDICATION.

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SMALLHOLDERS' NOTES.I

j COWBRIDGE -KESERYIST'S

IHEOLYCYW.

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YALE NOTES. I

FOOTBALLERS AND THE ARMY.I

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IPRINCE OF VALES FOR THE FRONT

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