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THE POSITION OF MR. T. CORY.

FORTHCOMING PRESENTATION TO…

TRIENNIAL ELECTION-

ETECTED.

NON-ELECTED. I

OPPOSITION FROM BRIDGEND.

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MAESTEG.

NEATT

CADOXTON (NEATH)

ABERKENFIG.

KEN FIG HILL.

LALESTON.

MARGAM.

LLANTWIT MAJOR.

COEDFRANC SCHOOL BOARD.

COUNTY COUNCIL ELECTION. .

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COUNTY COUNCIL ELECTION. BRIDGEND DIVISION. The County Council election for the Bridgend Division which came off on Monday, created an ex- ceptionally keen and widespread interest, not only immediately within the town boundaries, but in many an adjacent town, hamlet and village besides. And, considering the forces that have been arrayed against each other, and the intense feeling that has, for several reasons, been imported into the contest, this is not at all surprising. Whenever the two great parties are pitched in opposite camps and plunge at each other with a wildness surpassing the miracoloBs, poor human nature is to be forgiven if it gets a. little excited and drifts into the mental quandary known of men as "'E dunno where 'e are." This has been the case at Bridgend during the week preceding the red letter day of Monday. Our leaders-or some of them at least-had poured forth such vials of wrath that were so lavish in their adjectival vehemence, that folk couldn't help getting excited. The hall was set rolling in this direction at Mr Powell's first meeting by Mr George Bevan, who called Mr McGual everything,-and everything else besides, as Artemus Ward would have paradoxically added, once opened, the rnud- ,slinging exhibition went on as merrily as a wedding bell, both at public meetings and in the street. Charges against one candidate and counter-charges against the other were hurled about with such unerring constancy, that the poor electors got be- wildered and did not know whom to believe or whom to mistrust. The Liberals would accuse Mr McGaul of having applied to Mr Randall the unenviable aobriquet of nincoompoop," the Conservatives would retort by charging Mr Powell with advertising his generosity in extra type letters. The Liberals would then designate Mr McGaul a Sbon bob ochor," and the Con- eervatives would reply that Mr Powell preached the gospel accordinv to Labour in his election address, and lived out another gospel in daily life by refusing to raise hauliers wages. The Liberals would tell Mr McGaul that he had been asked to sever his connection with the Wesleyau denomi- nationâ" free to worship God without interference from bishop, dean, priest, or chapter," some know- ing one would add-and the Conservatives would in turn tell Mr Powell that he had been clandes- tinely wooing Roman Catholicism. Thus the war raged onâthe clashing of sects and the battling of parties"-and the coping-stone to the week's oratoryâbad, good, and indifferent-was put on on Saturday evening, when the Liberals were in cited to come and hear Joe Howes, the work- men's champion," whilst the Conservatives were requested to attend a meeting where the work. ing men would champion themselves." Whatever was said at the meetings, there is no doubt but that they gave a remarkable impetus to the interest in the election, and party feeling, to use a hack- neyed phrase, ran high. Monday was an ideal electioneering day, the air being as crisp and the streets as dry as the most active of party devotees could have wished. That was the case at any rate in the morning, though afterwards the sun's rays were the means of bring- ing about the usual slush. Indeed, there was so much slush by the approach to the Board Schools ⢠polling booth, that people got talking over" it (in two ways). It's you Tories that's bringing all this slush here," eaid an irate Rad. who had to stand in it, to a Tory voter. "Think so?" said the aforesaid Tory voter, "that shows that Tories most be more numerous than Rads." Prettily and wittily put, methought, though woefully falsified by the result of the poll. The polling opened very slowly, as polling always does. The first to record their votes at the Board Sohoolroom were Mr Tom Woodward and Mr T. D. Schoneld the earliest bird at the Town-hall was Mr James James, blacksmith. Polling proceeded at a ding-dong pace throughout the morning. Mr McGaul was early afoot, and scurried from one polling station to another with a briskness that put his opponent in the shade. Judging from his free and jovial demeanour, he seemed confident of being returned. Mr Powell did not appear on the scence till about 10 o'clock, having evidently not recovered from the severe chill from -which he has been suffering. He was accompanied by Mr Joe Howes, the speaker at Saturday night's meeting. The spirits of Mr Powell's supporters were heightened by the appearance of Mr T. J. Hughes, who arrived by the 11 o'clock train, and was greeted with undertone mutterings of "Good old Tom," The Conservatives, on the other hand, were elated by the superhuman energy which Mr MeGaul threw into the fray, and many and loud were the opinions expressed that Mac was a rare fighting candidate. The appearance of the streets became more animated as the number of conveyances sent for each candidate increased. Among those who sent horses and vehicles for Mr MeGaul were:â Mr Riley, Mr S. H. Stockwood, MrJ. C. Coath, Mr Oliver Sheppard, Mr H. Goulden, and Mr John Evans (Star Hotel), Mr McGauTs own carriage being also utilised. Mr Arthur J. Williaius, M.P., sent two carriages, with coachmen, and the other gentlemen who assisted in this direction on Mr Powell's behalf were: Mr D. H. Lloyd, Mr Edward John (Cowbridge), Mr W. Francis, Mr E. Beard, Mr W. Edwards (grocer), and Mr Lewis Edwards, whilst the candidate himself bad also his own trap in use. Almost all the vehicles were decked with the party colours. By mid-day about 200 had voted at the Board Schools, but a much less number at the Town-hall. The voting continued slow from now till six, when there was the customary spirit," the vehicles hying to and fro with redoubled velocity, and bringing in voters from distant parts, such as Laleston and Ewenny. As the evening shadows drew over the town the small boys," so well known in electioneering times, made their presence felt by screeching songs for their respective favourites, and parading the town with rattling pots, which fell on quiet folk with a peculiarly ear-piercing effect. Late in the afternoon the Conservatives brought out a blue handbill con- taining a behest "to follow London," and Lord Dunraven's victory at Wandsworth (ousting as he did one of the most popular members of the London County Council), was everywhere received with expressions of satisfaction. Henceforth the excite- ment grew, and the streets began to assume a lively sight." Groups of people stood here, there, and everywhere, discussing the situation, and specu- lating as to the result, a favourite device of persons with betting predilections being to bet the price of a hat," which ere now must have brightened the faces of lucky outfitters in the same ratio as they disheartened the losers. The prevailing opinion, when the poll closed, was that it was a close fight," and that the majority, on whichever side it might be, would be, smallâvery. THE RESULT. From the time of closing the poll on, Dunraven- place was filled with small knots of talkers, who seemed to be earnestly discussing the probabilities of success or loss, as the case might be. It was thought that the result would not be made known until at least 10 o'clock, and it was a.surprise there- fore when Mr R. C. Griffiths appeared at the gallery window of the Town-haU at 9.25. His appearance was the signal for a loud cheer, and this caused excited partisans to rush for the Town-hall from all parts. The Deputy Returning Officer then made his declaration, the figures being William Powell 447 William 0. McGaul 399 Majority for Powell. 48 The announcement was received with loud cheers, and the successful candidate, speaking from the window, briefly thanked his supporters for the con- fidence they had reposed in him, and expressed his intention of doing his utmost to show that their confidence had not been misplaced. County Councillor Powell was met at the side door of the hall, a chair was speedily procured from somewhere, and the victorious candidate was hoisted on the shoulders of his supporters, and carried in triumph to the Liberal Committee Rooms, preceded by an impromptu "band" consisting of youngsters, and the principal" instruments" being tin cans. There are 1022 electors on the register, and of these 846 availed themselves of the franchise, so that 176 electors abstained from voting. The ex- peditious manner in which Mr R. C. Griffiths and his assistants got through the counting reflects the greatest credit on their ability. At the conclusion of the counting Mr Powell proposed a vote of thanks to Mr R. C. Griffiths, deputy returning officer, for the able, efficient, and impartial manner in which the election has been conducted. Mr McGaul said he had great pleasure in seconding, and he fully endorsed the remarks of Mr Powell. Mr T. J. Hughes asked to be allowed to say, as a political opponent, that he had very great pleasure in supporting the vote of thanks. Mr Griffiths briefly acknowledge the compliment.

MAESTEG.

OGMORE DIVISION.

BRITONFERRY. -I

.— ELECTED UNOPPOSED.

PONTYPRIDD.

----+----+-. BRIDGEND SEWERAGE…

MR. J. W. ROBERTS' NEW PREMISES…

PULPIT REFERENCE AT BRIDGEND.

REV. W. SPURGEON AT COWBRIDGE.…

ABERKENFIG MUTUAL IMPROVEMENT…

1 ENTERTAINMENT AT EBENEZERI…

LAST MEETING OF THE OLD BOARD.

N O TIC E

[No title]

T CYCLONIC MEETING.

SHERIFF'S INQUIRY AT NEATH