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-------THE BALTIC.

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THE COURT.t

---THE ARTS, LITERATURE, &c.

------_._----PIGEON EAGES…

THE BRITISH GbBN TRADE.

AGRICULTURE.

HIJSTTS UPON GARDENING.

I;j'" WHY DO THEY BIE ?

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I j'" WHY DO THEY BIE ? The Times of the 21st October records the death of a labouring man named Richard Parser, who according to apparently sufficient evidence, had attained the age of 112 years. This patriarchal length of days, although rare, is not unprecedented even in comparatively modern times. Henry Jenkins is said to have lived for 169 years. He was born in the reign of Henry VII. When a boy he took a cartload of arrows to the English army at Flodden Field, and lived to relate the circumstance in the reign of Charles II. Thomas Parr, well known as "Old Parr," died at the age of 152, and enjoyed the posthumous distinction of being dissected by Harvey. Jean Claude Jacob, a serf from the Jura Mountains, appeared before the National Assembly of France in the time of the first revolution, when he was 120 years old. There is said to be an inscription in Camberwell Church perpetuating the memory of Agnes Skuner, who died at the age of 119, having been a widow for 92 years. In Hendon churchyard is the tombstone of an old woman who died at 104. A tailsr of Chertsey was in- troduced to William IV. on his 100th birthday, and survived the interview for four years. Many other ex- amples of similar longevity might be mentioned. But thsugh in a series of generations it is easy to find that a not inconsiderable number of persons have survived 100 years, yet,, as compared with the mass of humanity, their number is almost infinitely small. Few travellers reach the end of that bridge which has a hundred arches; most fall victims to the dangers ef the road. Few men live long enough to die of old age. They succumb to one or other of the diseases by which life is beset, but which are not the inevitable accompaniments of any period. With regard to the fortunate few who escape premature death from what may be considered accidental rather than neces- sary causes, we may wonder, not why they live so long, but why they die so soon. Indeed, we do not know, oi know only very imperfectly, why they die at al-1. We scarcely know anything about the progressive changes that occur in the body which lead to its inevitable ( destruction after an existence of between one and two centuries. It is a matter of interest and importanct that we should learn what are the definite and materia changes which occur as the result simply of age. How are the nervous, muscular, and glandular structures altered ? Are they degenerated into oil, or replaceo by connective tissue ? What is it stops the machine Lancet,

Facts and Facetiae, >-I

.... ATTEMPTED SUICIDE THROUGH…

NO EPSOM DERBY IN 1869?

NEW ZEALAND IN 1867.

A GALIFORNIAN WEDDING.

..-.L DARING BURGLARIES IN…

MADAME RAOHEL AGAIN.

-=--""'::"--: Our ivjLxcjcciiaiiy.

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