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[No title]

Facts and. Facetiae, —«—

NOT DROWNED

IHINTS UPON GARDENING.

THE LATE GALE.

THE , CASE OF A "PROMOTER."

RETURN OF FATHER IGNATIUS.

GREAT ROBBERY AT AN ARlYIY…

SHOCKING BATHING ACCIDENT.

VILLANOUS ASSAULT IN A RAILWAY…

[No title]

Our Miscellany.

[No title]

THE COURT.

THE ARTS, LITERATURE, &c.

SHOCKING OCCURRENCE AT | LEICESTER,…

AGRICULTURE. .

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AGRICULTURE. AGRICULTURAL GOSSIP. Hardly recovered from the disastrous effects of the cattle plagueâwhich, if not traced to a foreign origin, was most probably introduced from abroad-we are now threatened with a new danger which may prove almost as serious. The sheep-pox is raging in Holland, and animals affected with this fearful disease have arrived in the port of London. Mr. James Odams, in a letter to the Times, mentions two cargoes of infected sheep, viz., on the 5th inst. the Waterloo, with 1,314 sheep from Rotterdam, and on the 8th the City of Norwich, from Tonning, having on board 976 sheep. Since Mr. Odams's letter, the matter has assumed more alarming proportions. All the London wharves have been declared infected, and a large number of sheep-over 2,000â were condemned on Monday at the Brunswick Wharf, Blackwall, and ordered to be slaughtered. The Govern- ment have hitherto taken no. further steps than to increase their inspectors. To stop the importation- which, under present circumstances, appears the right step-is a serious matter, seeing that a considerable portion of the metropolitan supply comes from the in- fected country. The risk of the disease being com- municated to our flocks would not be nearly so great if we had a separate foreign market. Fortunately, the in- fected animals appear to have been discovered by the in- spectors but who can say that none passed muster, seeing that the animals may possess the disease for eight days without showing it ? The extremely infectious nature ofmall-pox is well known, and we shall indeed be fortunate if we escape so great a calamity. Mr. Cochrane, of Montreal, whom we mentioned as the pur- chaser of Duchess 97, takes out many other valuable animals, amongst others a "Wild Eyes heifer" of Mr. C. W. Harvey's (which has since produced a bull calf and three heifers), and a bull from the celebrated herd of Mr. W. Torr, of Aylesbury; also 50 Cotswold sheep from the flocks of Mr. R. Garne and Mr. J. K. Tombs. This is the first export since the cattle plague, and we trust Mr. Cochrane will be rewarded for his enterprise. The Times, according to usual custom, publishes reports on the probable yield of the harvest. Their notorious correspondent from Yorkshire is, however, silent. Mr. J. Sanderson puts the average yield in England at 34 bushels, estimates the area at 10,000 acres in excess of ordinary years, allows one bushel per acre for the extra weight of grain of 2tb. per bushel, and, granting these assumptions the result is an excess over last year of 4,671,285 qrs., and that of ordinary years of 2,472,974 qrs. The average, Mr. Sanderson assumes, is enormous. No doubt the wheat is a great crop upon wheat land but the light soils on the eastern coast cannot, yield well, and it is evident, from a leading article in the same paper since the report, that the estimate is too high. We only hope Mr. Sanderson, whose experience has been consider- able, may prove a true prophet, as a reasonable loaf would materially help to restore trade. The ram sales have continued slow, although a manifest improve- ment followed the growing showers with which most districts have been favoured. Notably one of the more important events in this line was the sale of Mr. W. B. Canning's Hampshire rams and ram lambs. Mr. Canning has been a successful exhibitor at our leading shows, and has taken no less than 23 prizes at the Royal and Smithfield Club shows on several occasions, but brought his stock to the hammer in consequence of giving up showing: 216 lots were disposed of, the biddings being spirited, and the prices satisfactory. The highest price for lambs was 30 guineas. The two- tooths varied from 40 guineas to five guineas. Mr. Willoughby Wood, who has frequently appeared in print as the champion of the Shropshires, could not get into high figures, although his sheep are spoken of as better than usual. Should the grass grow and the late turnips promise well, higher prices will be made and we recommend a little patience.âField. BEDDING HORSES ON SAWDUST. In reply to a correspondent wishing to try the experi- ment of using sawdust for litter, the editor of the Field gives the following :â"The drains may be plugged, as they will not be required, owing to the absorbent nature of the sawdust. A correspondent who had used it for a great length of time, alike in stalls and loose boxes, and in the hovels in his yearling paddocks, and who, when he wrote, had hunters, hacks, carriage horses, and mules standing on sawdust, said The wet and soiled surface of the bedding is raked off every morning, and a little fresh sawdust added, by which means it is kept sweet and fresh but when much discoloured and hardened it is taken away altogether, the floor swept, and three or four wheel-barrows of fresh sawdust put on. This is only done four times a year.' Other correspondents, however, merely raked in the droppings, which are quickly deprived of all moisture by the sawdust. Some preferred pine sawdust, others beech oak is the worst. With regard to the manurial value of the refuse sawdust, one correspondent says it is the best possible foundation for hotbeds another that it makes a strong and excellent manure for both kitchen and flower garden; a third, that he had used it with wonderful effect on clover, and also on grass but a fourth stated that it had burnt up the grass on which he had spread it, owing, no doubt, to its being too highly charged with ammonia to be thus used in large quantities."

REVIEW OF THE BRITISH OORN…

EXPLOSION OF FIRE-DAMP ON…

STORMS IN FRANCE.

THE STORM AT LIVERPOOL.

THE CONDEMNED MURDERER IN…