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111B FARMERS' CIRCLE.

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111B FARMERS' CIRCLE.

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horns and Herefords," the latter, I be- lieve, greatly, if not entirely, composed of the Montgomeryshire Smoky-Faced breed, has been pushed and supported by influential men in days gone by, while the Mont- gomeryshire Smoky-Faced has been left to take care of itself. Now I have been breed- ing these cattle for the last six years, having bought pedigree cattle at the late sales. I find from personal experience that they are â1st, very hardy; 2nd, undoubtedly good milk-rs, (this bears out Ailsbury Dairy Co.'s report; 3rd, undoubtedly good feeders on I puor laud, without cake or corn (this again bears out Ailsbury Dairy Co.'s report; 4th, they will ulllk and feed on bad land better than Shorthorn or Hereford cattle will; 5th, the butchers will give more per lb. for these than for any other kind, because the fat and lean are more equally divided 6th, they are further more prolific, several of my cows bringii:g twiLS, and one cow has done so for the last two seasons; 7th, their hide is worth more than any other kind of cattle, being stronger, and making better leather it is most, astonishing that they have been left unnoticed so long, indeed until they are nearly extinct. But I trut that it is not too late to preserve a valuable poor man's beast, which will thrive 1m poor pasture and produce milk with a hig i percentage of fat iiid butter-making prop-rfi s. Several of my cows milk all the ve r round until the? ca/Vd again, and at the same time ar iboth fat and well. None of tiem get any c ike or coin in any way, and their condition speaks for itselr. WEATHER AND CHOPS. The weather of the putt week has be n exceedingly favourable for the important wo.k now c,cupyi,.g the chief attention on the farms. Harvesting operations were greatly facilitated by thndrv reliable nature of tLte work, and the work is now at a very forward stage. The crop has been cut, and so far secured in the pink of condition. The only regret is that the task of in-gathering is not a more arduous one ia respect to bulk. In a few cases there is no room for com- plaint on this head, but generally the dis- satisfaction is too well founded. The quality of the if ruin will, as a rule, be of a high standard. It i3 admirably matured and linely-coioured qualities greatly desired in the market samples. The fodder supply will be universally s«3ant. The blank hay crop aggravates the shortness materially, which will be all the more felt that what there is is appetisingty rich and sweet. The decond crop of hay promises to belie earlier expectations and ardent hopes. In weight It will be extremely disappointing. Pasture also fails to satisfy anticipations and wishes Tho fields, in pleasing contrast to their blighted appearance in July and midsum- mer, present a green, healthy acpect; but, notwithstanding this, grass is by no means plentiful. Indeed, although of beautiful green colour, many of the pastures are lamentably bare, Buth crops are promising in most parts. The weather recently has greatly favoured these crops, and pushed GllOill on in rapid fashion. Potatoes, too, present an improved appearance. FRAUDULENT TRADING IN MEAT. The report issued last week by the House of Lords Select Committee "On the Market- ing of Foreign Meat, &c. brings to light a deplorable state of affairs in the meat trade. The practices that are alleged to have been indulged in so freely and so generally are nothing short of disgraceful to the nation. Dishonesty would appear to have been one of the leading features of the meat trade in recent years. The unsuspecting consumer has been cheated on all hands, and in the most deliberate fashion. Respect for the truth and the interests of their customers have had a remote place in the butchers' rules of trade conduct. Honourable princi- ples and conduct were completely disre- garded that a little extrA. gain might be de- rived from their nefarious actions. The report will, no doubt, convey startling intel-1 ligence to a large section of the public, as it assurtdlv will unwelcome and discomfiting information to the members of the trade. To us and many others it occasions no great surprise. It rather confirms grave sus- picions and confident anticipations. In ex- exploring and exposing the deplorable state of the meat trade the Lords have earned the permanent, gratitude of the British public at large. The producer and consumer of meat are alike benefited by the investigation, while the occasional honest trader will also benefit by the correcting influence of the exposure. We hope the matter will not be allowed to rest even at the so far satisfactory stage it has attained. Legislation is greatly needed and urgently called for, and full jus- tice will not have been measured out to the I wide and important interests concerned until 1 some stringent rules are drawn up and fn. 1 forced by the Government. Now that suf- J ficient light has been shed upon the unscru- pulous mysteries of the trade to arouse pub- lic interest and imagination, it is to be hoped < the matter will not again be allowed to fall I into the background until the subject has 1 been fully debated and satisfactorily dis- posed of. 1