Hide Articles List

7 articles on this Page

Advertising

111B FARMERS' CIRCLE.

News
Cite
Share

111B FARMERS' CIRCLE. (BY ONE WITHIN IT.) STARTLING EVIDENCE. The evidence brought out by the House of Lords Committee was of the most convincing character, The Committee could not have arrived at any other conclusion than that misrepresentation was practised in a whole- sale manner by many butchers. And such .is their emphatic finding as gathered fiom ril report. "In a large West End estab- lishment professing to sell nothing but English and Scutch meat, only six sides of Scotch were said to have been sold during the vhole year, the rest being American. In >ih^r shops in the City and West End three- fourths of the beef sold as English is said to be American. Meat imported to and killed at Deptford is often labelled 'Prime Eng- ¡Ã,h.' In all these cases it appeared that the prices charged were those which would be j;istii el on y had the meat been purchased ,vhu es de at thn prices commanded by the best houit-\illed meat The American beef vÃWli. landed bears a label indicative of its origin and quality, but the Committee, with < Jllt exception, did not have brought undei the r notice a single case in which the retaii lealer failed to r m)ve these indications of origin as s)ou as the meat came into his lands." This kind of fraud appears from th-* evidence to be practised chiefly against well- o-io customerf, the customers of what ire c i led fi st-cl as- establ shments. There is a converse fraud for the poor. It was c. td by Al; j r tta;pool. ihe rejort says ihat the mi as of iiome-kiiled bulls and old ,)W8 is often sold to the poor, who are led o believe that the inferior quality is due to toieigu origin." In Lancashire, it is stated, tit- stringency of the regulations for dealing vith tu erc.iicsis in (a tie involves a loss of iiie animal out of every five. In conse- quence," the Committee reports, the pur- hf.sers prefer to buy animals landed dead after the removal of the lungs, without diich no indication of the existence of that isease can be detected." The effects of the ishonesty of a certain number of retailers vere lamented by witnesses representing very interest. everal representatives of h.e colonal export trade stated that the rade would be benefitted by a system of larking, as the colonial meat would then be airly judged by consumers on its own merits in respect of both price and quality. :'he home farmers are equally sure that if heir meat were fairly put on the market its uperior quality would ensure it a larger onsumption even at its naturally higher rice. Whichever view be correct, at any ate competition ought not to be deranged "y fraudulent misrepresentation. Of course oboly says or believes that these practices re universal amongst butchers. But it is >vious that of this dishonesty there is a reat deal, and the Committee, in view of ie evidence before it, certainly does not go '10 far in recommending that every butcher 'oaling in imported meat should be corn- el led to register himself as such. Without a.-iking any very definite recommendations, '10 report shows that there is no insuperable -ffieult.y in the way of a regulation for the larking of imported meat, and the Board of \ade ha,8 now to consider whether the ex- >5iit of the mischief does not require the â¢nforcement of a regulation to this effect, ,.Lieh appears to be unanimously and rdently demanded by the British farmers nd meat consumers. AGRICULTURAL DEPRESSION. A daily contemporary concludes an article on agricultural depression thus:â"When ve rettd of liiitish farmers shooting their -ti-cfcr to be spired tb'1 pain of seeing them perish of starvation, of plans to feed cattle ipon loaves of bread, and of the utilisation of weeds of the hedgerow and of prickly bitter stuffs like goree to keep the herds dive. it is high time for farmers and their tdvisHvs to seek out remedies for them- selves." The annual meeting and dinner of the ncnrporal ed Society of Inspectors of Weights and Measures were held at Ander- un'b Hotel, Fleet-street, London, on Thurs- day, Mr John Hutton, president, in the chair. Mr Jasper More, M.P., was also and in tho course of a speech re- ferred to the scale of corn, and said the only thing needed now was some sort of deputa- tion tu the Board of Trade. The Vice-Presi- of the Board of Trade was thoroughlv with them, and the President of the Board ot Agricu tuie, who, he thought, was one vith them. Their inquiry occurred just at the time when the most of the agricultnral societies were holding their meetings. They might have the deputation in the autumn, and it would help them if Mr Hutton would be one of its members The question was one the House of Commons had always tried to grapple with and had failed. It might be a tiresome one, but it was an interesting jiies'-ion. Little progress has been made with the proposed Royal Commission on Agriculture. be Government were disposed to entrust the championship to a Conservative or Liberal Unionist, but in both parties there is a marked indisposition to accept the post This will not, however, lead to the abandon- nent ,.f the Commis ion, as a Ministerialist will, it necessary, be appointed. Until a â hainnan is chosen the nomination of mem- tIers e tnnot be proceeded with. MONTGOMERYSHIRE SMOKY-FACED CATTLE. Mr T. F. Kynnersley's herd of these ;attie are advertised to be shortly sold by tuction, and the owner gives the following iccount of them :-Why the Ailsbury Dairy f Ilo. should have got rid of their stock is a mystery to me; and I can only imagine that they listened to the voice of the breeders of .)ther cattle, notably the Sussex, and so were induced to sell what I consider a most valu- tble herd of cattle, and one which is fast dying out for the simple reason that Short-

Advertising

Advertising

MARKETS.

Advertising

111B FARMERS' CIRCLE.