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SECONDARY EDUCATION.

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SECONDARY EDUCATION. Breeonshire Committee's Outlook. A special meeting of the Breconshire Education Committee was held at Brecon on Friday to consider recommendations from the Higher Education Sub-Com- mittee proposed to be submitted to the Departmental Committee now inquiring into the organisation of secondary educa- tion in Wales. There were present- Prof. Jos. Jones (chairman), and Mrs Jones, the Revs. Canon Finucane, Prin. Lewis, H. W. Lewis, E. Rowland and W. Llewelyn, the Hon. R. C. Devereux, Messrs. A. Beckwith, H. A. Christy, J. D. D. Evans, Morgan Morgan, David Powell, T. Price, W. S. Miller, J. T. Boucher, L. Jones, J. L. Davies, G. C. Christopher, Edgar Morgan, H. H. Wat- kins, H. Williams, Jas. Powell, W. J. Rawlings, E. Griffiths, D. Fisher, and Idris Davies. The following draft of questions and answers was eventually adopted, being that submitted by the committee with a few modifications Qiiestioit.-Doeg that part of the pre- sent organisation of secondary education in Wales which is determined by the Welsh Intermediate Education Act, 1889, and the county schemes made under it, hamper the development of secondary education, and, if so, what changes are necessary in order to enable the develop- ment to proceed freely both as regards the new provision and the curriculum of schools ? Answer.-Secondary schools set up under the Intermediate Education Act are partly controlled by the Local Educa- tion Authority and partly by Local Governors. This dualism of control hampers the promotion of secondary education. All secondary schools should be subject to the control of one body, so that uniformity-where uniformity is necessaryâe.g., as regards staffing, stipends of teachers, &c., might obtain. In case a policy of differentiation of curriculum be desirable, such a policy should be adopted by a central body capable of considering the requirements of the county as a whole. 0.âDoes the present organisation of secondary education in Wales hamper its proper co-ordination with other stages or branches of education, and, if so, what changes are considered necessary ? A.-Under the present system it is difficult, if not impossible, to co-ordinate secondary education with other stages or branches of education. This lack of co- ordination between different kinds or grades of education is the glaring defect of our system. In view of the require- ments of the new Act it is more urgent than ever to bring about this co-ordina- tion. This cannot be effectually done unless there is one authority in charge of education in all its grades and branches. Elementary education cannot be properly organised without due regard being bad to secondary education. Q âThe provision, administration, and methods of award of scholarships, and the question of the provision of adequate accommodation in hostels ? A .-The present provision of scholar- ships is hopelessly inadequate. Their number should be determined by the number of persons who are anxious and able to pursue a course of secondary education. All children should receive whole time education up to 16. provided that there is a State subsidy in the case of necessitous families. The method of selecting secondary school pupils on the result of a written examination is un- satisfactory. Hostels should be provided where necessary in connection with secondary schools, so that pupils who have to live away from home might be properly looked after. Q -What is the best way of reconciling the excercise by a Local Education Authority of its duties (both educational and financial) under the Education Act, 1918, with the stimulation of local interest in the schools ? A.-Whereas there ought to be one county authority in charge of all grades and types of education, and therefore of all schools within the area, it is impor- fant that schools should be managed by district committees, including members co-opted because of their special interest in and knowledge of education, familiar with the locality, but subject to the Local Education Authority. Q.-Is it desirable to have a common system of inspection for all secondary schools forming part of the recognised public provision in Wales, and what should be the relation to this system of (a) the State (b) the Central Welsh Board (c) the University (d) the private schools or endowed schools not belonging to the recognised public provision of secondary schools. A.-T he Central Welsh Board exam-. ines and inspects for the Board of Education. But the latter reserves the right to inspect the schools apart from the Central Welsh Board. It is desirable in the interest of uniformity that there should be one system- of inspection for .all secondary schools and that a body conversant with Wales should be en- trusted with the examination of our secondary schools ? Q.-Is closer co-operation desirable between (l) county local education authorities and Part III Authorities of areas included in the county (2) ad- joining Counties or groups of Counties, and (3) the whole of Wales and if so, for what purpose ? A.-It is very desirable that better understanding and closer co-operation should be brought about between Local Education Authorities. Adjoining -counties should co-operate in the setting

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SECONDARY EDUCATION.

SECONDARY EDUCATION.