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HAY.

Presentation to Miss L. Doulton¡…

SCIENCE NOTES AND NEWS.1 .-

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————! I CRICKHOWELL.I

A JAPANESE LADY'S DIARY.

THINGS THAT DO NOT LOOK PROMISING.

a ICELAND MOSS.

BLUNDERS OF BEE KEEPERS.

EXECUTIONERS AS SURGEONS.

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EXECUTIONERS AS SURGEONS. The mediaeval executioner must have had a practical acquaintance with anatomy and have acquired a very considerable skill in operating upon the human body. Not only must he sever the head rapidly and neatly from the trunk of his victim, and must have been strong and unerring in his dreadful work, but he had many minor surgical operations to perform in satisfy- ing the sentences of the law. His work was not confined to the neck region, says the Zoophilist; he had to lop off finger after finger of the living subject, he had to amputate the hand and foot, cut off strips of skin from a prisoner's back, stretch men on the rack, draw and quar- ter with practical skill, and fJl this under the eyes of his employers and the public. SUPERSTITIONS ABOUT BABIES. Almost all countries have their supersti- tions about babies. In Holland, bread, steak, garlic, and salt are put into the cradle of a new baby to ensure it always getting enough to eat. In Greece the mother, before placing her child in its cradle, turns it three times round before the fire, singing to it the while, to ward off evil spirits. In Sweden a book is placed under the head of the baby to make it quick at learning to read, and money is put into its first bath that it may be rich. In Wales a knife or a pair of tongs is put into the baby's bed to keep danger away. In England a baby is taken upstairs be- fore going down for luck." In Spain the little one's face is lightly brushed with the branch of a fir tree, also "for luck."

. ERI MOTH SILK.

_..---.,.----DEAD SEA BITUMEN.

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liA3A WAR PENSIONS COMMITTEE

HEREFORD ARCHDEACONRY AND…

BUILTH WELLS.

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