I IPOULTRY KEEPING.|1918-07-11|The Brecon County Times Neath Gazette and General Advertiser for the Counties of Brecon Carmarthen Radnor Monmouth Glamorgan Cardigan Montgomery Hereford - Welsh Newspapers Online
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HOW TO OBTAIN THE PATTERN.

j' DROWNED NEAR BRECON.

I IPOULTRY KEEPING.

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POULTRY KEEPING. A PROFITABLE HOBBY. BY 11 UTILITY." WHAT PROFITS DO YOU MAKE? It is a great mistake to let year by year go I by without knowing how much your fowls cost you, and how much they give in return. The poultry-keeper with only a few fowls should keep strict account of every penny he spends and every penny he earns in eggs or birds. Very soon now it will be a good time to make a reckoning, for most birds will begin to moult. It. is only by keeping accounts that we shall get rid of that sweeping statement one so often hears—that there is no money to be made out of fowls. Even now, with food so I dear, taking the year all round, it will gene- rally be found, if care is taken of the birds, that there is a nice little profit even from half a dozen hens. Besides, it is only by keeping accounts that one learns where the money goes and which hens are most remunerative. A carefully-kept account will show whether there are any directions in which it would be wise to extend operations, and whether economy is needed in any particular item or method. Get a large book, and enter up day by day on one side the number of eggs laid and those that have been sold, and keep a record of any others sold alive or otherwise disposed of. On the other side every item of expense must be entered. The stock shcmld be valued at the commencement of the year, and again at the end of the half-year. Stock should then be taken again, and thus, by entering up all the outgoings and all the incomings, it will be easy to see whether profit has been made or a loss. Some allowance must, of course, be made for the cost of the ktbour where em- ployed, and a rent, if only a nominal amount, should be charged. This, on farms, can, how- ever, be set off by the value of the manure. Besides keeping accounts, it Is a good plan also to keep a diary of events, such as the results of hatching in particular months, the state of the weather at the time, comments on the results obtained from, different breeds or types of poultry, observations on the market price of eggs and table fowl, and so on, so that these can be compared year by year. A GOOD WHITE BREED. White varieties are now as popular as they were once .unpopular. This is chiefly because in the past few ye'ars some of them have proved of wonderful excellence as layers. The White Plymouth Rook is fast becoming a favourite with breeders, and in some cases is preferred to the long famous Barred Rock. In America it has long enjoyed a high repu- tation as a fine egg-layer, and a bird of ex- ceptional hardihood. Such useful qualities cannot fail to interest- a large section of British breeders. 11 The birds are of the heavy tVDe. and if hatched early enough in the year," "the pullets make steady and abundant winter layers of good-sized, brown-tinted eggs. The hens are close sitters and ready brooders. The chickens WHITE PLYMOUTH ROCKS. I I are very easy to rear, and though they may be a little slow at first, they are .among the most I rapid to reach maturity. The skin and shanks are yell aw, which classes them at only second I rate as table birds.. Yet for other buyers, the births sell well, the flesh being nicely distri- buted and tender and juicy. The bjrds are large and well developed, the cocks weighing up to 121b. The wings are small, the thighs short, and the shanks of moderate length and unfeathered. The origin of tlie Rocks is v<*ry doubtful, but it is believed that the White originated from Monmouth. Maine, U.S.A., in sports from the barred type. The two varieties are similar, except, of course, in colour, this breed being a pure white with yellow legs. RATIONS FOR POULTRY. At last poultry are to be included with the rest of the li, stoek in being rationed, and 50,000 tons of poultry food are to be set aside by the Ministry of Food for the maintenance of the best breeds of" poultry for utility pur- poses. Feeding-stuff Committees are already in existence, and shortly Poultry Sub-Com- mittees are to be formed, and these togeti er will deal with the rationing system. The special ration consists of 4oz. of food a day, but to be able to obtain this poultry must come within two grades with certain restric- tions. These restrictions state that fowls must be utility stock for egg production or for breeding; they must be pure bred, the stan- dard of health of the flocks must be high; and that these conditions have been in existence for two years. Further, the owner of the stock must give an undertaking, that he i ready to supply to the public day-old chicks, eggs for hatching, and older stock at a cost no greater than his 1917 charges, and selective breeding of hens and cocks must (for the poultry to be included in the first grade) have been carried out. Poultry owners who require this ration must make application to the Secretary of the Poultry Committee in their own area, and supplies will be distributed through the re- tailer nominated in the application form* No mention has as yet been made of the thousands of poultry tha' fall without tl esi- restrictions: the cross-breeds, the mongrels of the farm labourer's wife, who depends upon them for a part of her food and for the little bit of extra money she obtains bv selling the esgs. No mention also is made of the poultry- keeper who started to keep poultry last year at the urgent appeal of the Ministry of Food, and nothing is said about the nondescript turkeys, geese, and ducks that exist, all over the country and are of real valne to their owners.. Possibly all these matters, though.

i ECY TOWER FETE.

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I IPOULTRY KEEPING.

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