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AGRICULTURAL NOTES

DRESSMAKING AT HOME, I

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DRESSMAKING AT HOME, I BY SYLVIA. I An Chferall or Morning Gown. I So many women are now occupied in war work of various kind's that overall garments are much in request, and as they are also much needed for other occupations I have turned my attention to the illustration of another pattern, in No. 1,919, this week, which has several points to commend it. In the first place, it is easily slipped on; I and, in the second, is so cut that it will do either for a dress for morning wear or war- work purposes, the little cap being an addi- tion which munition or canteen workers will find necessary, whilst to the housewife it will be a. great addition to her comfort. As to materials, for any of the purposes mentioned coloured casement cloth is excel- lent, being cheap, washable, and of good wearing qualities. Drill or nurse's cloth can also be recommended for the purpose, but the PATTERN NO. 1,919. wearer or maker will choose what is most suit- able to her work, a few buttons being the only other addition required. To Cut Out and Make Up. The skirt, being a. two-piece affair, will need the material opened out to its full width- and then doubled in order to get this without a join, or at most only a corner-piece at the lower part of back. Place the centre-front to the selvedges, when part of the bodice couldl be obtained from the slopes of the skirt- widths. The centre-front should be placed to correspond with the front of skirt, whilst the centre-back should go to a fold. Allow good turnings' for seams and hems, and mark round very carefully. When making-up, join up, neaten and, press back and front seams of skirt, make and fasten off the placket opening, then hem the lower edge. Now take the bodice in hand. Face the fronts, make buttonholes in right side, and sew the buttons on left to correspond, or use press fasteners if you prefer them, and pub on the buttons as decorative finishes. Join back and fronts together by the shoulder and under-arm seams, make and sew on the collar, then make the sleeves, arrange comfortably in the armhole, stitch in firmly, and finish off. Now make the waistband, which should be cut lengthways of the material, and madie up over stiff banding. It is rounded off at one end, and is stitched along the turned-in edges once quite close and the second, time about a quarter of an inch away. When ready, secure the bodice and skirt to upper and lower edges, then face neatJy in- side and fasten off. The overall will require about 5 yards of 36-inch goods. 2 A Yoke Skirt for a Young Girl. Hereâin No. 1,920âis a nice pattern for a skirt for the y«ung girl in her early or middle teens. It is of the circular order now so much favoured, with the addition of a yoke, which, relieves the plainness of the hip-portion. It is 6f PATTERN IVo. 1,920. intended for an everyday affair to wear with washing blouses, and is quite easily made up. As to materia,Is-the choice being now a little more limited than before the war-the selection must depend on circumstances and cost. To Cut Out and Make Up. The model is a two-piece affair, so you must open out your material to its full width, as I have stated above, and place the centre front to the selvedges. If very wide material is usedâwithout right or wrongâyou may find it more economical to reverse and cut one width in the other; but good turnings should be allowed, especi- ally for a hem, and the pattern must be well and clearly outlined. Now seam up the skirt, opening, pressing and neatening the &eams; make and finish off the placket-opening, and then turn up, stitch, and press hem. Next make and tack yoke over muslin, neaten and finish off the fronts, where buttonholes can either be made or fasteners be sewn on, and the buttons put on as a finish; then arrange to skirt, stitch, face in- side, and fasten off. The skirt will require 2} yards of double- width goods. HOW TO OBTAIN THE PATTERN. Onr paper patterns are specially cut tor us from designs expressly prepared for this column, and the cost of each complete pattern is 6Jd. post free. Address all letters, enclosing stamps for patterns, to Sylvia," Whitefriars House, Carmelite- street, London, E.C. Be sure and mention the number of the pattern required when ordering. Patterns will be despatched within three days w the application being received.

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