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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. .

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IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. In the House of Lords, on Thursday, after several public and private bills were advanced different stages, the ad- journed debate on the Representation of the People Bill â was resumed by Lord Grey on clause 15, which provides that no borough which had a less population than 10,000 at the census of 1861 shall return more than one member. To this Lord Grey moved an amendment that the minimum should be 12,000 instead of 10,000, an alteration of vital importance to the Government scheme of redistribution of seats. Their lordships, after a long discussion, divided on the question that the words "ten thousand" stand part of the clause, when there appearedâcontents, 98; non-contents, 86; majority, 12. Lord Grey's amendment was therefore rejected. The other clauses up to 27 inclusive was also agreed to. The House then resumed, and the other orders of the day having been disposed of, their lordships adjourned. In the House of Commons, Mr. M'Cnllagh Torrens gave notice of his intention on an early day to ask the House for apledge to maintain the zClO Lodger Franchise. On going into supply, Mr. Monsell raised a discussion on the Irish railways. At the conclusion of which Mr. Graves drew attention to the restrictions on the importation of foreign cattle into Liverpool, drawing from Lord R. Montagu the reply that the Privy Council was anxious to make every relaxation consistent with the exclusion of the cattle plague. Mr. Cowper moved an address for a Royal Commission to inquire into the best mode of classifying and exhibiting in our different museums the national art collections; but upon Lord J. Manners reminding the House that the Chancellor of the Exchequer had promised to bring in a bill next Session, Mr. Cowper withdrew bis motion; and Mr. Taylor brought under the notice of the House the recent decision of a Cornish magistrate, sentencing six persons to three weeks' imprisonment for trespassing off a path through a wood, and the legality ef the sentence was called in question by Mr. Shaw Lefevre and Sir R. P. Collier. The House then went into Committee of Supply, and on the Packet Service Vote, The discussion, which turned chiefly on the inexpediency -both in a political and economical point of view-@f en- couraging a foreign line of steamers a'; the expense of the Peninsular and Oriental Company, which was represented to have performed such important public services, and on the objections to making contracts without the sanction of Parliament, was continued by Mr. Childers, Mr. Samuda, Mr. Laing, Mr. Ayrton, Mr. Gladstone, and others; and, after a sharp controversy over the rival claims of Falmouth, Plymouth, and Southampton, as the station for the West India Mail steamers, the vote was agreed to. The other orders were disposed of, and the House ad- ourned.

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