THE FENIAN CONVICTS M'CLURE AND KELLY.|1867-06-01|The Brecon County Times Neath Gazette and General Advertiser for the Counties of Brecon Carmarthen Radnor Monmouth Glamorgan Cardigan Montgomery Hereford - Welsh Newspapers Online
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HOUSE OF LORDS.—MAY 27.

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HOUSE OF COMMONS-MAY 24.

HOUSE OF COMMONS, MAY 27.|

HOUSE OF LORDS.—TUESDAY..…

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THE COURT..

THE FENIAN CONVICTS M'CLURE…

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THE FENIAN CONVICTS M'CLURE AND KELLY. The Speeches of the. Fenian convicts M'Clnre and Kelly, in Cork, before sentence was passed upon them, differed but little from those of Burke and M'Cafferty in Dublin. The expectation that MICIure would acknowledge regret for his crime was disappointed. He refused to express a sorrow he did not feel with regard to his well-meant exertions for this oppressed land." He was satisfied with the righteousness of his every act in the late revolutionary move nent; he had been actuated by the holy desire to assist in the eman- cipation of an enslaved but generous people, and he had derived more pleasure from having done what he could for that purpose than from any event which had occurred to him during his eventful though youthful existence; He wished it to, be distinctly understood, standing as he did perhaps on the brink of an early grave, that he was no filibuster or free- booter, and that he had no object or advance- ment to gain in coming to Ireland; he came solely through love of the country and its people. If he- bad forfeited his life, he was ready to abide the issue. If devotion to a distressed people was- a crime, he was willing to receive the penalty, knowing, as he did, that the cause was just, and that what he had done was to aid a people who would appreciate and honour a man, though not a countryman of their own, who was ready to suffer in defence of those divine American prin- ciples of the right of self-government." McClure had committed this speech to memory, and had several times a difficulty in recollecting it. Kelly, on the other hand, spoke fluently. He thanked the jury for their re- commendation to mercy, but knowing what that mercy was, he hoped it would not be acceded to. Why should he fear death? What was death? The mere passing from this life into the next. He trusted to have pardon of his sins, and he left dread of death to such desperate wretches as Corydon and Massey-" Corydon, a name once so suggestive of sweetness and peace, now represented by a loathsome mass of filth." Chief Jus- tice Monahan having arrested the convict in this line of remark, he went on to say that remembering that since England had obtained a footing in Ireland every generation in Ireland had risen to protest with their blood against the occupation of our native soil by the English, surely that is a reason why sentence should not be passed upon me." He believed that in the insur- rection he had done right. Next to serving his Creator, there was no more solemn duty than to serve his country. The judge said tha jury had humanely recommended them to mercy, but the court bad no power whatever in the case. The recommendation would be forwarded to the Lord-Lieutenant, but no hope that it would be attendod to could be held out. In the 1(, case of James Walsh, alias Colonel O'Brien, next tried in Cork for high treason, evidence was given of the meeting of 2,000 Fenians near Cork, at a place called Prayer-hill, on the 5th of March. They marched under command of the prisoner, and of a Captain Mackey, to attack Ballyknockayne police barrack, tearing up the rails and breaking the telegraph poles as they passed on. At Bottle-hill, when the military were seen, a Fenian fired upon them the military returned the fire, and then," added the witness, an approver named McCarthy, | « we all ran away as fast as we could."

THE NATIONAL MEMORIAL TO HIS'…

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