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THE ESTABLISHED CHURCH.

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THE AFGHAN REVOLT.

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THE AFGHAN REVOLT. t f THE ATTACK OX THE RESIDENCY. I A long and interesting telegram has been received t it the India Office, giving a full account of the t 3abul massacre, by Taimur, the survivor. He says the soldiers were dissatisfied at not receiving their pay, and S shouted "Let us kill the envoy, and then the Ameer." 1 They rushed into the court yard of the Residency, and i stoned some servants. The guides opened fire without t orders. The mutineers went for firearms, and returned to the attack. The city people joined the mutineers. 3ir Louis Cavagnari was struck by a richochet bullet. ( A sowar was sent to the Ameer, but was taken prisoner. The Guides sowar grass-cutters are in Cabul, in safety, t There are no troops on the Cabul road, nor in Jellalabad c rr Dakka, nor as far as Taimur knows are any coming. Doad Shah did his best to stop the mutiny. He was stoned and bayoneted, but was alive when Taimur left. On the afternoon of the attack, Sardar Yahya and I Mustaffa Habibulla also tried to stop the disturbance, but were fired at, and forced to retire. i A sowar belonging to the Corps of Guides, named c Taimur, who was present at the attack on the British i Residency at Cabul on the 3rd inst. and subsequently escaped, arrived at Lundi Kotal on Tuesday morning. v He brings the following further particulars respecting s the massacre of Sir Louis Cavagnari and the other: c members of the British Embassy The roof of the < Residency being commanded by other houses was un- f tenable, and the besieged made a trench outside, About one p.m., Sir L. Cavagnari was severely wounded s by a ball, which ricochetted on to his forehead. Mr. Jenkyns, who arrived at the residency during the i attack, wrote a letter to the Ameer asking for help. ( The reply received was, "God will; I am making 1 arrangements." Previous request for aid by Sir L. Cavagnari had received a similar reply. The sowar was told that Lieutenant Hamilton shot three of the mutineers with his revolver, and killed two I with his sword. He also heard that Dr. Kelly was ( lying dead inside the Residency, and that Sir Louis Cavagnari was in the room which was burnt, and which subsequently fell in. His body had not been found, and] the other three officers of the guides were burnt to death. 1 near the Residency. Another sowar, who had escaped, ( was in Cabul, but was prevented from leaving. He told f Taimur that the grass-cutters were in safety, that he i had helped Dr. Kelly when wounded, and that Mr. Jenkyns had written a second time to the Ameer, stating that Sir Louis Cavagnari was wounded. The 1 bearer of the letter was cut to pieces by the mutineers, J Taimur then started, but was disarmed, and placed in confinement. He succeeded, however, in escaping, and at daybreak of the 1th September, he visited the 1 Residency and saw the body of Lieutenant Hamilton lying across a mountain gun, stripped of his jacket, but not dishonoured. Mr. Jenkyns was with Yahyah Khan, 1 Taimur saw no troops on the road from Cabul to Jellalabad and Dakka, and, as far as he knew, none 1 were coming. An eye witness of the attack upon the Residency j states that the assault commenced at one o'clock in the day, but at eight in the morning Major Cavagnari received information which led him to believe that a rising was intended. The defence was heroicâ4.000 men attacking 70. The mutineers brought up artillery and used it against the Residency. Most of the de- fenders were shot down: the Envoy himself was stabbed. The bodies have all been mutilated. The ] Afghan loss exceeded 300. The Ameer had other troops > who remained faithful to him, but he made no efforts whatever to interfere. A Bengal Moollah bitterly re- proached him for permitting the sacred person of an ( Ambassador to be injured, and begged him to endeavour to save him, as his death would be for ever a dishonour to his name. The Ameer, however, intimidated by the fanatical native Moollahs, did nothing whatever. A Cabul messenger arrived at the Shaturgadan states that Major Cavagnari, was warned of the approaching attack, and made some preparations for defence. The mutineers used heavy guns in their attack upon the Mission. The Ameer wished to protoct the Mission, but was intimidated by the Moollahs. He begged the mutineers in vain for the lives of the Envoy and his companions. The following despatch has been received at the India Office :â FROM THE VICEROY, SEPT. 16. "Following from Kandahar, Sept. 15:â'Private letters from Cabul state three regiments only engaged in attack on Residency that the affair was apparently unpremediated, having arisen from disappointment of these three regiments at getting one month's pay only, and that no serious attempt at relief was made beyond preventing other troops taking part.' The Ameer, Yakoob Khan, has sent another letter to Ali Khel, again expressing his confidence in the British Government, and his deep grief and distress on account of recent events. He announces his intention to punish the offenders. The Paris correspondent of the Standard says:â"The French believe that two big wars are inevitable, between England and Russia for supremacy of Central Asia and between Russia and Germany for military supremacy in Europe. Frenchmen are singularly ignorant of England's military capabilities and resources, and, above all, they are almost ludicrously unawares of the fighting proclivities and military spirit of the English race. Even this evening the Libertt talks of the coming con- flict between Russia and England as a duel between a whale and an elephantâa stale joke of Prince Bis- marck's, which Russia would give a great deal to be able to think a reality. The position taken up by the French press is that the English are bound to take Cabul and annex it, and that operation (as to the successful performance of which, however, no doubt is entertained) must bring England into violent collision with the Russians. The tone of the Russian press is not calculated to discourage that opinion. As to the war between Russia and Germany I think it is some- what remote. But be that as it may, there is a war cloud hanging over Europe, and its influence may be clearly discerned even by the most superficial observers in France."

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— 1 THE ZULU WAR. !

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