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DANGER OF CHILDREN PLAYING WITH LUCIFER MATCHES. -On Wednesday, firemen on duty at the Crystal Palace were called to extinguish a fire raging in the grounds of Mr D. Child, a carman, situate in the Red Road, Gipsey Hill, Upper Norwood. The engines were drawn out of the Palace and taken to the spot, when it was found that some children, whilst playing with Lucifer Matches, had set fire to a stack of hay. The firemen, however, managed to confine the fire to only one stack. Mr Child was not insiired.-5t indai-d, 12th August, 18G3.âAccidents of this kind could not possibly arise with Bryant and May's Patent Special Safety Matches, which ignites only on the box. HOLLOWAY'S PILLS.-Stomach, Liver, and Bowels.â In all painful affections of the stomach and disordered actions of the liver and bowels, one single trial of these Pills will demonstrate that they possess regulating and renovating powers in a high degree. They speedily restore the appetite, lessen the unpleasant distention of the abdomen, and so prevent inflammation of the bowels and other serious abdominal ailments. Holloway's Pills afford the greatest comfort to the dyspeptic invalid with- out harassing or weakening the most sensitive constitu- tion, or interfering materially with the ordinary studies, pleasures, or pursuits. The simplicity and efficacy of this treatment has evoked the gratitude of all classes in both hemispheres, and commanded a sale for these puri- fying Pills unprecedented in medical history. ,1: I J -1 C. â¢- Several of the Mexican States have revolted against the rule of President Juarez. There is an unfortunate man residing at Blyth who has had three wives and thirty-eight children. A woman was fatally injured in Birmingham, on Saturday night, through being knocked down by a bicycle. The three thousand cotton operatives who were out on strike at Wigan have all resumed work at the old terms. Tha prisoners Davies and Grantham, charged with the silk robbery from Messrs Leaf's, in the City, have been sentenced to seven and five years' penal servitude. It is stated that Mr Austin, the representative of a large American shipbuilding firm, will purchase Deptford Dockyard for £ 140;000. The first piano has been introduced into Japan, and the Mikado has directed his wife to take lessons. Lady Parkes, the wife of the British ambassador, is to teach her. William Strong, the young western farmer imprisoned for alleged poaching committed many years ago, has received the Queen's pardon. The Swiss Federal Council has appointed M. Dubs President of the Confederation, in the place of the late M. Ruffy. M. Dubs was vice-president under his predecessor. The last mortality returns published show rates varying from 20 per thousand per annum at Wolverhampton to 47 at Edin- burgh, which seems just now to be the unhealthiest place in Europe. Mr Perry, her Majesty's late inspector of prisons, has just died and left Dr Colenso the handsome legacy of zP-2,000, as a "mark of his respect for one who has so manfully stood against bigotry and intolerance." Mr James Crighton, a spirit dealer, died from hydrophobia in the Dundee Infirmary on Tuesday week. He was bitten in the hand about seven weeks ago by a black retriever dog. The wound healed three weeks after, and it was not until Sunday week that symptoms of hydrophobia were manifested. The Solicitor-General has declared that in his opinion the late proceedings in the election of lord rector for Aberdeen University are abortive. The new election has been fixed for to-day, and Mr Grant Duff will be unopposed. We understand that proceedings will in future be taken against any grocers or others who hold licences to sell spirits, wine, or beer, if they infringe the law by keeping open their houses for the sale of articles during prohibited hours or in any other manner.Pall Mall Gazette. Mr Leonard Edmunds has notified that he intends to apply next term to the Queen's Bench for leave to file a criminal in- formation against Mr W. E. Gladstone, the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr James Stansfeld, and Mr George A. Hamilton, who signed the Treasury minute branding him as a "public defaulter." In cases where claims upon insurance offices are made in respect of damage by fire, the offices frequently take possession of the salvage without allowing the claimant access to it. An instance of this came before the Court of Common Pleas last week, when the Chief Justice expressed his strong disapproba- tion of the practice, than which nothing could be more wrong or contrary to law. The irregularities which characterise the accounts of many life assurance societies have attracted the attention of the Government, and a Bill is to be brought in next session pro- viding for an efficient public audit at regular periods of the con- dition of these concerns. This announcement will fall like a bombshell among the committees of certain societies whose accounts have hitherto been conspicuous for the enormous per- centage of receipts swallowed up in working expenses." One evening in September last a passenger on the Midland Railway arrived at Market Harborough Station, where he wished to get out. The train, however, had shot beyond the platform and the lights, and on his leaving the carriage, he fell upon a heap of bricks, thus injuring his foot. An action against the company for damages was brought in the Court of Exchequer, but Baron Bramwell ruled that there was no evidence to go to the jury. "People," said the learned judge, "ought to take care of themselves, and not get out a carriage without looking where they would alight." The reciprocity fallacies were effectually demolished both at the Liverpool and Manchester Chambers of Commerce last week. At Liverpool the proceedings of the Foreign and Colonial Com- mittee showed, in connection with the French Commercial Treaty, that while in 1854 the imports and exports were valued at £ 16,800,000, their value in 1807 had risen to £ 57,757,000. In the Manchester Chamber, Sir Thomas Bazley, Mr Platt, M.P., and other leading members concurred in declaring that the French treaty had been attended with the most beneficial results both to England and France. At the request of Mr Bruce, the Mayor of Liverpool (Mr Alderman Hubback) has forwarded to the Home Office a copy of the Licensing Bill prepared in 1867 by a joint committee of magistrates and town councillors, and subsequently adopted and promoted by the corporation. It contained clauses restricting the hours of traffic on week days from seven a.m. to eleven p.m., and on Sunday from from one p.m. to three p.m. and from eight p.m. to ten p.m., power being given to local authorities to close public houses altogether on Sunday if they thought proper to do so. The need of the assistance of the Government in promoting the emigration of the unemployed poor was pressed upon the attention of the Right Hon. W. E. Gladstone, on the 3rd inst., by a deputation from the Emigration League. Mr Gladstone, in reply, said that the first duty incumbent on a Government was to avail themselves of all practicable means of relieving the distress of the people, wherever such distress existed. He, however, refrained from expressing any opinion upon the argu- ments and recommendation of the deputation, but promised that he would bring them under the notice of his colleagues, and that the most respectful consideration would be given to them. The United States Senate has instructed the Foreign Affairs Committee to report upon the expediency or otherwise of recom- mending the President to offer the mediation of America to settle the Red River difficulty. It is probable that whilst the com- mittee is gravely considering this question all necessity for mediation will pass away. Advices from Winnipeg state that dissension is spreading in the ranks of the insurgents, that the leader of the rebellion, Riel, has lost his authority, and that the old governor and council have been restored to power. The pro- posal for annexation to the United States meets with no favour, and it had been agreed to send a deputation to make terms with the Canadian Government for the union of the territory with the Dominion. One of the last members of the literary circle which used to meet at Holland House in the early part of the present century has just passed away in the person of the Rev. Charles Townsend, Rector of Kingston-by-the-Sea, near Brighton. He has died at the ripe age of eighty years, after suffering during the last three years from paralysis. He was a personal friend of Lord Byron, Samuel Rogers, Horace and James Smith (the authors of the Rejected Addresses), William Stuart Rose, Wordsworth, the historian Hallam, Mr J. G. Lockhart, the late Lord Holland Sir Thomas Lawrence, Sir F. Chantry, &c.; and an especial favourite with the late Earl of Egremont, who conferred on him his little living, which, with its tiny church and parsonage, and still tinier populationâfor it it was one of the smallest in Sussex he never could be persuaded to exchange for wealthier pre- ferment. An inquest has been held in London on a child supposed to have been burnt to death through the cruelty of her step sister. According to the evidence the mother said to the deceased, My dear; will you tell me how it was done ? Tell me the truth, for God will know if you do not." The deceased, who was per- fectly conscious, said, I know God is good. Sally (meaning the step sister) asked me to hold the baby, and I would not, and she said, If you don't take it I will burn you with this poker. She did not take the child, and her step sister put the poker, which was red hot, down her back, and her clothes took fire. As soon as the step sister saw her clothes were on fire she said, 0 God," and ran out of the room. The inquest was adjourned. A communication from Chamounix states that two English tourists, Messrs Horace Walker and Moore, members of the Alpine club, accompanied by three guides, left the town at six one morning the week before last to reach the Jardin. Arrived at the spot called Les Ponts, about a league from Montanvert they were forced to retreat, as the snow was falling heavily and driving in their faces; they crossed the Mer de Glace and returned to their starting-point in passing by the Chapeau. The following day they went and slept at Pierre-Pointue, and at five in the morning commenced the ascent of the Grands Mulets, which they accomplished by twenty minutes to eleven. After having enjoyed from this magnificent point of view the spectacle of the whole chain of the Swiss Alps, they descended in safety, reaching their hotel at five in the evening. According to the oldest of the guides, such excursions have never been under- taken in the month of January. The American papers of the 22nd ult. give accounts of Prince Arthur's arrival the previous day in Mew York, on his way to Washington. The Prince seems to have been very quietly re- ceived. "No noisy demonstrations," we are told, "were made by the comparatively small crowds assembled near the Thirtieth street platform and in front of the Breevoort House, on the Fifth Avenue. A lunch at the hotel, a drive in the park, a brief in- terval of repose, dinner, and a visit to Wallack's completed the programme of his first day in the city." At the close of the per- formance at Wallack's theatre, three cheers were given for Prince Arthur, the son of good Queen Victoria,"and the Prince acknowledged the compliment by raising his hat. His likeness to the Prince of Wales of ten years ago was generally remarked. William Skeplehorne and his wife were indicted at the Central Criminal Court for having conspired to deceive a Mr Ironside by falsely representing that his wife had been delivered of a female child. The infant had been presented by Mrs Ironside to her husband as his own, after a sham confinement, and the female defendant acted as nurse on that occasion. When the child was several months old, Mr Ironside's suspicions were aroused, and it was discovered that the infant was the illegitimate offspring of a young woman named Fanny Wood. For the defence it was urged that Mrs Ironside was the principal offender, and that she induced the defendants to assist her in deceiving her husband. The jury found Skeplehorne and his wife guilty, but sentence was postponed in order that a point of law raised during the trial might be consideredâwhether the female defendant was entitle(L to an acquittal as having acted under the control of her husband. A somewhat singular charge of libel was mentioned in- cidentally in the Court of Exchequer last week. The plaintiff is a Dr Williams, at one time medical adviser to the family of the Duke of Somerset, who had the misfortune some time ago to lose their only son by death. Since that event it is alleged that the duchess has continually represented that it arose from some default of the plaintiff, whose professional character has thereby much suffered. An application for postponement, on account of the illness of the duchess, was to some extent conceded, with liberty to take her grace's evidence by commission. The Solici- tor-General said the Duchess of Somerset had called Dr Williams a "hypocritical murderer," and one of the charges was that he had deliberately allowed the only son of the duke and duchess to die because he would not meet another medical man, and that he mismanaged the case from professional spite. âMr Hawkins: No, no.âThe Solicitor-General: The Duchess of Somerset has chosen to circulate the libel for months. On Wednesday week a large portion of the valuable col- lection of oil paintings and drawings in Wigwell Hall, Derby- shire, the residence of Mr Henry Goodwin, was found to be totally destroyed, the canvass of the pictures being torn to shreds and the frames smashed. Mr Goodwin's son, who arrived at the hall on the previous Tuesday night, is in custody. This is the same place where Miss Goodwin was murdered by Townley. The prisoner has been brought up before Messrs H. W. Walthall and J. Wheatcroft. Several witnesses were examined, none of whom saw the prisoner do any damage to the pictures. He was, however, the last person to go to bed on Tuesday night, and when the servant man went to his bedroom the next morning he asked the prisoner what he had been doing with the pictures, to which prisoner replied, the pictures." He was also found in the library by himself about four o'clock on Wednesday, and some picture frames were then burning in the fireplace. The magistrates committed him for trial at the next March assizes. There was a great row at an election meeting at Southwark the other night. A number of printers had met to consider the respective claims of Odger and Waterlow. When Mr Applegarth, who was to be chairman, and his friends arrived, they found the platform and a great part of the hall occupied by men from Sir S. Waterlow's establishment. After some time Mr Applegarth and about half-a-dozen members of the committee succeeded in getting upon the platform, amidst a deafening hurricane of groans and cheers. Mr Applegarth attempted to take possession of the chair, but this was resisted by the friends of Sir Sydney Waterlow, who insisted upon appointing a chairman from their own party, selecting Mr Conisbee, a master engineer, for that position; and his party at once attempted to hustle Mr Apple- garth and his friends off the platform. This became the signal for a most terrific row. The supporters of Mr Odger, who formed about two-thirds of the meeting, composed of about 1,500 persons, pressed forward, and many of them succeeded in literally fighting their way to the front. Having succeeded in this, they next scaled the platform for the purpose of ejecting the Waterlow party, and a terrible struggle followedâhats and umbrellas were thrown into the body of the meeting, friends of either party were hurled head long from the platform amongst the surging crowd beneath, and several persons were severely bruised and injured in the mel0e. The chairman's table and the chairs on the platform were broken up and hurled into the meet- ing. This scene lasted for nearly an hour, with alternate ad- vantage to either party, but at last the Odger party, by reason of their greater numbers, succeeded in ejecting the whole of the Waterlow party from the platform, and as fast as they were hurled down they were taken in hand by the Odger party below, who by this time had got complete possession of the front of the hall, and forcibly hustled out of the plaee. Mr Applegarth then took the chair, and a quiet meeting was held. j _uu"u wie nnalolJsequies of Mr Peabody. It is stated that the Easter Monday review will take place this year at Brighton. The Great Eastern has arrived safely at Bombay with the Indian telegraph cable. Mr Buller, a bank manager at Ashby-de-la-Zouch, hung him- self last week. No reason is given; and a verdict of "temporary insanity" has been returned. The « Economist" publishes statistics showing the improve- ment in the Lancashire cotton trade. It believes that the pre- sent prosperity will be of long continuance. The Globe" says sixty clerks are to be dismissed from the War Office, and that ominous letters have been sent to the heads of other departments inquiring what is the lowest num- ber of employes they can continue to go on with." Major-General Simon Eraser writes to the Daily News to say that he possesses the genuine cane given by Lord Lovat on the scaffold to William Fraser, of Ford and that sold by Messrs Suttaby, it is assumed, must have been spurious. The election for Mallow, vacant by the elevation of Mr Sullivan to the bench as Irish Master of the Rolls, terminated in the return of Mr Munster, the numbers at the close of the poll beingâMr Munster (liberal), 91; Major Knox, 83. Marfori, the notorious favourite of the ex-Queen of Spain, has fallen into disgrace, and been sent about his business. Had her Majesty taken this step two years sooner, she would pro- bably have been now reigning in Madrid. At ton o'clock on Friday week, at Knowles Colliery, Sal- ford, the firedamp, from some cause at present unknown, was fired, and a tremendous explosion followed. Sixteen men were seriously burnt, and several of the sufferers have died. A singular robbery has occurred in London. A clerk was presenting some cheques at a bank, when his attention was for a moment withdrawn, and the contents of a case, said to contain notes and documents to the value of £ 10,000 were abstracted. The thief escaped. The Tipton Slasher is now an inmate of the Gateshead work- house. The "Tipton Slasher" was once a noted name. It was the fancy alias of William Perry, born in 1812, at Tipton, in Staffordshire, who from his eighteenth year was known locally as a fighting man of great power. The Times of India says it is pleasant to be able to state that the Duke of Edinburgh has left a most favourable impres- sion behind him at Calcutta, and that the native chiefs re- turn home highly pleased and dazzled with all they saw in that city. The most magnificent private gallery of works of art in Europe is about to come to the hammer, and is expected to realise more than half a million of money. The Demidoff Gallery, in the Villa of San Donato, at Florence, has been stript of its trea- sures, which are to be sold in Paris during the present month and the next. We regret to state that, in consequence of a sudden and serious indisposition of the Rev. Newman Hall-so well known in connection with the Surrey Chapel and St. James's I-lall-his physicians have advised him to leave London at once for the Holy Land, where he will remain for at least eight or nine weeks. Mr Lefroy has resigned his seat in the House of Commons for the University of Dublin. The hon. gentleman, although his father, the well-known Chief-Justice. only died a short time ago, is in his seventieth year, and he assigns failing health as the cause of his retirement. It is believed that the Hon. David Plunkett, Q.C., will be Mr Lefroy's successor in the representa- tion of the University. A conference, in which the O'Donoghue, M.P., Sir J. Gray, M.P., and other Irish liberals took part, was held in Dublin, on the 3rd inst., to consider the land question. Resolutions were adopted, condemning capricious evictions, demanding permanent fixture of the tenant in the soil, continuous rights of occupancy, subject to eviction only on non-payment of rent or sub-letting, valuation of rents, right of sale of interest by tenant, and the establishment of local land tribunals. The case of Phillips v. Eyre is now under consideration by the Court of Exchequer Chamber. The plaintiff, a native of Jamaica, brought an action for assault against the defendant, Mr E. J. Eyre, who held the governorship of the colony during the out- break of October, 1865. The Court of Queen's Bench decided in favour of Air Eyre, on the ground that he had been indemnified by the Colonial Legislature, and also by an Act of the Imperial Parliament. The judges of the Common Pleas and Exchequer are now called upon to review this decision. More discoveries of malpractices by Admiralty officials have been made. It is stated that on the 3rd inst., Mr Baxter, M. P., and Mr Birstow, held an inquiry at the Royal Victoria Yard, Dept- ford, into the conduct of one of the foremen of stores and the fact that the official had deiiitnde(I a douceur or bribe from one of the contractors was fully proved. Mr Baxter stated that the charge was of a criminal nature, and the offence was one which the Board of Admiralty and himself had determined to visit with severe punishment. The offender was discharged from her Majesty's service. A silk mercer of Kingston brought an action in the Court of Common Pleas against a Mr Hayter to recover the sum of 4128, for goods supplied to the defendant's wife. The question was whether the wife, who was now living apart from her husband had any authority to pledge his credit to the extent represented by the amount of this bill. It was contended for the defence that the goods for which Mr Hayter was now sued were never used in his own house, but were procured by his wife in preparation for an elopement, which has since been the cause of a suit in the Divorce Court. Mr Justice Keating expla ned to the jury that a wife, even when living with her husband, had no absolute right to pledge his credit. The jury found for the defendant.

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LECTURE "BY MR D. DAVIES AT…

THE NEW SHERIFFS.

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