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LECTURE "BY MR D. DAVIES AT…

THE NEW SHERIFFS.

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V" ic^iuas triea to "interview" Prince Arthur at ew York:â Reporters darted up the stone steps, and, with their luracteristic modesty, approached the desk. A young person, b ho was said to represent a provincial paper, seemed determined o interview the Prince at all hazards. He button-holed the roprietur, who listened patiently to his questioning. Inform- ition was freely imparted, but the host distinctly gave the young man to understand that his services as porter were not needed while the Prince was his guest. Just then the luggage was brought in, whereupon the reporter aforesaid took his stand by he door and commenced taking an inventory of the royal baggage. First, there were three black tin boxes, then a bundle of silk umbrellas with paragon frames. Here the proprietor came up, and again the countryman ventured a seductive smile. A lackey in a long drab coat approached, and the reporter photographed him on the spot. Then more baggage was brought in, and the reporter dil aofc fail to note the splendid material of the sole- leather trunks. There were hat-boxes of every size and shape. The cocked hats were stowed away in triangular cases, while the numerous shawls and blankets were visible among the scores of packages. When the luggage was properly numbered, the person with a drab coat and wooden spine maned to stoop low enough to reach the hanilles of a 50 doL valise and carry it up to his Highness's chamber. Here another reporter arrived, and for the seventeenth time thb landlord was obliged to take the stand." Those who have never been present at a cross- examination between a reporter and his victim should attentive- ly read the following:â(Question: What time did he arrive? 'Answer: At one o'clock. Did you receive him? Yes, sir. Where' Yonder, on the pavement. What did he say? What did you say? (By this time the victim wiped his face.) What were your first impressions on taking the royal hand? Did Minister Thornton lead 'â¦he way ? How many are there of the party? When will the Prince leave the city? Will he visit Central Park? You gave bim your best parlour, did you notI suppose you engaged a -squad of French cooks for this occasion? Say, look here, you rwant a good notice? You shall have it. I will give you a .quarter of a column. And the editors, I know, will speak of :our noble generosity. I hare it. You let me act as porter; I Lean carry baggage and answer the bell. My uncle had a hotel in Milwaukee. I will give you 50 dols., a puff, and the promise of ..an editorial, if you will grant me this slight favour. Answer: JMy dear sir, I canuot possibly do it. The idea is a good one, and il think you would carry out the programme splendidly; but I "cannot think of it. I will aid you in anything else if I can. Question: Who said grace atthetable? Did the Princehavea gold (tiapkin-ring Did he put salt in his soup ? Who was the master of the ceremonies? What is the name of your head waiter? Does *^he Prince chew tobacco? How many courses? Here the poor aman was sent for by the clerk and while he was gone the Reporter sharpened his pencils and stood waiting for his victim to .eturn. P Mr J. S. Mill ought to be vexed for declining to attend 't,he recent Woman Suffrage Convention in America, when t 1e reads the report of the proceedings of the speaktrs. f Dne of the speakers was Miss Couzens, who "glided forth n dashing costume, clasped her little muff in her two little .'lands, and, in her sweet but sadly monotonous voice, 3,1- t .1 Ecstatically complimented Wyoming," which lately de- hdared for woman's rights. Mr H. B. Stanton having llelivered an oration, once more "the slender Phoebe a.fouzens, of the sleepy expression, the curly dark hair, the areful toilette, trotted her clicking little boots to the desk, e6nd said she was disappointed in the feeling of the capital. sofhe public men who should be helping them withheld that inelp. Miss Phoebe fluttered her wings over that dreadful .Fst of ugly epithets, criminals,' 'slaves,' paupers,' and ⢠idiots.' Her bright girlish presence captivated the udience." be A sensation was produced in the Irish Court of Queen's r. ench, by a statement made by Dr Battersby, Q.C. mete learned gentleman appeared for Mr Nicholson (the ndowner whose coachman was lately shot dead, while -v .mself and a lady were badly wounded), in an ejectment W; and he produced and read to the Court a letter which set; had received, threatening him with death unless he Inithdrew from further proceedings. The threat was com- ented upon by the Bench in terms of strong indignation. ie following extract from a letter describes the state of P;ge which the unfortunate Mr Nicholson is compelled to Maintain:â Li^is house is garrisoned by a dozen constabulary, and is Qirricaded from top to bottom. I happened to come across the I gentleman, going out for a constitutional, and a pretty sight tQwas for a civilized land. First came a brace of policemen is ned with carbines, and who kept a sharp look-out around all j > hedges and other places that might hide a murderer in them; a a distance of some twenty yards or so, the old gentleman and son, each with a double-barreled gun over his shoulder, and iked by other policemen, with two more in the rear. body dared to stop at his house lest they should be shot at in Easing to and fro. JifVn important question was raised at a conference of the an>rking Men's Club Union on Thursday week, namely, -r>,to the extent to which it was desirable that the State '>uld exercise a control over friendly societies greater M,n is provided by present enactments. Mr W. P. Tktison, the actuary, who opened the discussion, ex- ixxssed an opinion that the Registrar's certificate had been :chievous, that the prevailing belief with respect to the eral insolvency of friendly societies had good founda- coi, and that their unsatisfactory condition was generally ng not to culpable mismanagement or recklessness, but ignorance and the difficulties inherent in the manage- a it of a complicated business. He considered that the 3es of insolvency were inadequate premiums and ex- 'agant expenditnre. With a view to correct these tbcts, he proposed among other things that the State gjld lay down a minimum premium to be charged, that s £ hould make a system of clear accounts and returns ing reference to the financial position of the society ^pulsory, that societies which did not comply with these *»isions should be dissolved on application to the judge b-ae county court in the district where they were estab- cgd, that the scope of the business should not include rannuation or deferred annuities, and that these pro- ns should apply to all societies granting allowances in allesB. He explained that, owing to the variety of con- ns and character among friendlysocieties, it would be --It to make one enactment apply to all, and that this w,ulty would to a great extent be met by an accurate Pification of the institutions comprehended under the bral term "friendly societies." There was a general cjnrrence of opinion that the present state of things was g^isfactory, and that the Registrar's certificate had been understood. Lord Lichfield, who presided, adjourned iscussion to Thursday next, and before doing so he aied out that the Bill which he introduced three years tlvould, to a large extent, have prevented much that s-L)bjectionable in existing societies. bcunous petition has been presented to the French te. The prayer of the memorial was that the fathers **3 greatest number of children should be invested s'some new decoration, and that the entire fraternity tlchelors should be subjected to a special tax, rising in o nt according to their age. One of the senators, M. p, accepted the petition quite seriously, but opposed ayer on the ground that there was no necessity for "wing the suggested recompense. new days ago a man committed suicide in the Bishop- nouth cemetery, by his wife's grave. A neat little 3tone is erected to her memory, surmounted by a in the middle of which her likeness is let in under transparent glass. Her name, place of birth, the °of her death, and a scriptural text are on the stone, h-e,'L 'uy-" Also, Margaret Jane Bigot, her mother" "died a few weeks ago in London), and "In the p of life we are in death." Immediately under the ture likeness, and preceding the above inscriptions, ie words, G. W. S. Bigot, 1st February, 1870," jme illegible writing in pencil, supposed to have 6mtten by the deceased on Sunday week. When »ered, he was lying on his back as he wished to be h the earthâ alongside his wife and child. In this 3n it is surmised deceased tW the poison, as its y! would be almost instantaneous, and the arrange- Bof the body was perfect. His hit, with his gloves *was at his side. His clothes were of a "shabby ,il" descriptionâall black, but worn. lingular charitable society exists in Berlin. It has no rces beyond thrown-away ends of cigars," with the jce of which, however, it is able to clothe completely i poor children, supplemented with Christmas gifts Itys and sweetmeats." ,ie following is true, the history of highway rob- repeats itself. A report is afloat (says the Western Mercury) at Newton Abbot of an attempted high- )bbery between that town and Chudleigh, under Xstances of a very peculiar and novel character. At Jiour on Saturday night, a waggoner in the employ Watson, miller, Billamarsh, near Chudleigh, was ing home, and when about half way he was stopped lerson in female attire, who asked for a "lift," and isnted. Whilst "she" was getting into the waggon iced whiskers on "her" face, and he at once concluded was a man in disguise. The party had also a small and without making known his suspicions, the ner drove on, impressed with a feeling that he should moment have to give up a large sum of money he longing to his master, otherwise he would be the of a terrible tragedy. However, after serious t, he proved himself equal to the awkwardness of ition. He dropped his whip on the road, and then iuch characteristic coolness he requested his un- le companion to jump out after it, assigning as a that the horses were restive. The request was com- vith, but as soon as he regained the whip he d the would-be robber down with the end of it, )ve on. He returned to Billamarsh in a very ex- ate, and, having made known the circumstances, people returned to the spot, and it is alleged the who reealy turned out to be a man, was found in a 1 state, and in the parcel he had with him were red two loaded pistols and a whistle. It is re- ;he fellow has since been given in charge of the Yankees are more enterprising than the English in ter of excursions. The latest spec. is worth re- According to the Chicago Tribune, one of the eastern railways of the United States is complet- ngementa for through tickets by rail and steamer he world. The tickets are to be good until used, ravelers opportunities to make excursions in Japan, ;he Holy Land, or wherever tourists may be dis- leave the main line of travel. The prices are .in New York as far east as Alexandria, in Egypt, t to Yokohama and Shanghai. The whole trip lade inside of ninety days, and the entire cost will 1,000 to 1,200 dollars. tandard has the following interesting and curious in an article on fire insurance-" ,-t the curiosities of fires are the effects of time and on their amount. That December should be a bad can understand; it is the season of intense cold, and lent artificial means of warmth being multiplied. It er, the season of jollity and conviviality, and of con- trelessness and risk. Next follows August, the hottest the year, which dries up and renders combustible exposed to the sun's influence. How much effect has may be seen from the fact that the year 1868, summer was unusually dry and scorching, was singu- ul in tires. There was scarcely an office which Sid icavily on farming stock; and the question as to â¢.urance on that property is still seriously under con- It is curious to tind that from nine to ten o'clock at e hour most prolific of fires in London, and that f exciseman," old age," "high tide," and "the cat i causes of fires. But tne most curious and most in- «t to those behind the scenes in these matters is the existence of a regular trade in incendiarism. In- i .UvLL\ v independently of the profes- sional incendiaries, who effect insurances on property "which does not exist, or which they remove secretly, burnin g the-pre- mises supposed to contain it, it is well known that in thousands of cases the temptation to realise full value for an old-fashioned stock, to get ready money for unsaleable goods, overcomes the honesty of many a poor trader, and we fear it must be said of some even in good positions. This prevents companies from making higher profits and lowering their rates of premium. The other day a man of respectable connections was ap- [ prehended at Brightlingsea, near Colchester, under some- what peculiar circumstances, by two detectives from Lon- don. On the 27th May last a man named Edwin James Yates absconded from Ross, Herefordshire, and the Gloucester Banking Company offered a reward for his apprehension on a charge of obtaining £7,000 by a series of forgeries. The delinquent was traced to the continent, and there lost sight of. Meanwhile a person of very re- spectable exterior, and of evidently good education, sailed from Ostend in a small fishing vessel belonging to the river Colne, and landed at Brightlingsea, where he soon made friends, especially amongst the Dissenters, to whom he represented his capabilities so successfully that he was elected to the post of master at the Methodist school. For about two months matters went on very smoothly, but a few days ago two detectives, who had been watching his movements from a house opposite to the school with a view to his identification, recognised the object of their search, though he had grown a moustache. He was ar- rested and taken to London en route for Ross. During the coming session, it is very improbable, the Spectator thinks, that any unexpected discussion will arise. "A regular Game-law fight, with borough mem- bers all awake and county members at once angry and disconcerted, would perhaps seriously interrupt the pro- gramme of the session, but that is the only little cloud visible as yet. To all appearance, we shall have six months of hard, steady, fructifying, but comparatively silent work." The Saturday Review interprets the general public opinion to be that the coming session will be a dull one. There is, it is said, no chanee of a great party fight. The conservatives are hopelessly crushed and demoralised, and the ministry is all powerful Even those who cannot bear the dreary prospect of a perfectly peaceful session, cannot think of anything at once entertaining and pos- sible, except a break-up of the Ministry from internal dis- sensions, only to come together again from inevitable necessity. Certainly things never looked quieter. The Manchester Reciprocity Association wrote to Lord Derby to ask whether the letter published some little time since, in which his lordship avowed his opposition to Pro- tectionist views, was correct. They received in reply the following note :â Knowsley, Prescot, January 22,1870. SIR,-In answer to your note of the 20th, written by desire of the Manchester Reciprocity Association, I beg to say that a letter was written by me some days ago, of which I did not think it worth while to keep a copy, declining an invitation to attend a meeting to be held in London, for the reason (among others) that I was not in favour of the reimposition of the various duties on imports which have been abolished of late years. This, I suppose, is the letter referred to in the article which you enclose. It was not published by me, nor have I seen it in print, but the opinion expressed in it is one which I have never concealed, and which I cannot disavow. I remain, your obedient servant, )1. H. Chadwick, Esq, DERBY.