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LIVERPOOL CORN.—TUESDAY.

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WEIGHTS FOR THE SPRING HANDICAPS.

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RACING FIXTURES. Birmingham Feb. 8 and 9 Lincoln Spring. Feb. 16 and 17 Carmarthenshire Hunt Feb. 22 and 24 Baschurch Feb. 25 Liverpool Spring March 8, 9, and 10 Bangor April 1 COURSING FIXTURES. Abergele Feb. 3 Hereford â¢. â¢â¢ Feb. 3 and 4 Upton Magna Feb. 14 and 15 Waterloo Feb. 16, <fcc. SPORT IN WALES. A Denbighshire fanner writing to the Field says:â" I send you the account of a rnn with the B.C.C.H., which took place on Monday, the 17th inst. This pack only commenced hunting the districts round the Vale of Clwyd last year, and have had great difficulties to contend with. The sport last Monday was, however, most encouraging. The meet was at Haforlands, the seat of H. R. Sandbach, Esq., and as usual at this fixture a good fox was soon found in a likely looking gorse near the Llan- rwst Lodge. With scent breast high, the hounds rattled their fox over tne grass enclosures towards Llanrwst; but turning to the left ran a ring round to Cemmes Dingle, which they crossed at once, making over the hill at a pace which the field found it next to impossible to live with. The hounds raced this gallant fox over the open, and without a check up to the Coed Coch Woods; here, inclining to the left, they skirted the Dawn Valley, and, sinking the hill, ran into the rookery at the back of the house at Coed Coch where though the varmint had been repeatedly viewed close before the hounds, a most unaccountable check took place, followed by cold hunting. The right line was fortunately recovered, and the pack sticking to their fox with great determination, were soon on better terms with him; and after another ring round the valley this tough customer, a fine old dog fox, was run into in the grounds at Coed Coch. Thus ended in the most satisfactory way, this capital run, which occu- pied two hours and three quarters. The pace was great, con- sidering the severe nature of the country, the distance up to the first check (eight miles) being covered in thirty-five minutes. e g Men, hounds, and horses had quite enough." THE ALLEGED CRUELTY OF FOX HUNTING. (From the Sportsman.) It is,now just half a score years since Lord Redesdale submitted a Bill to Parliament entitled An Act to Prevent the Entering and Running of Horses carrying very Light Weights for any Plate or Money." One of the restrictions sought to be imposed upon owners was that no racehorse should carry less than 7st. Jockeys who lay on flesh," just as racehorses do during the winter recess, would have bailed the passing of such a law as a boon, and if the preamble of the Act recommending a return to the old weights and distances had been carried, such men as Wells and Aldcroft would be enabled to ride in a greater part of the events recorded in the Racing Calendar without "wasting," or what, in turf parlance, is sometimes termed having the "muzzle on." The penal- ties sought to be imposed upon persons who saddled their horses with a heavier weight than the impost named was 2200, and, in addition to this, the forfeiture of the horse, with an allowance of double costs to the informer, would have been insisted upon. Subsequent to the rejection of this Bill, some members of the House of Commons sought to abolish the running for Royal Plates, and attempted to convince men of common sense that "since the abolition of 12st. imposts and four-mile heats, our breed of horses had sadly deteriorated." After a Ion debate on this sub- ject, and many speeches" from honourable members, the majority of whom displayed a lamentable amount of ignorance on equine subjects, and racing in particular, General Peel and Lord Palmerston came to the rescue, and I quote from the Parliamentary report in the daily papers of the time, as follows: General Peel entirely disagreed from his hon. friend, that the breed of horses had deteriorated in this country; on the contrary, he believed there had never before been a breed possessed of so great powers of endurance and speed. He might claim to speak with some authority on that point, having himself been a breeder of horses for forty years. Lord Palmerston said he entirely agreed in what had fallen from the right hon. and gallant gentlemen opposite (General Peel). He differed altogether from those who contended that the breed of horses had deteriorated; on the contrary, he thought the general breed of horses was better as to substance and power ot endurance. Any one who went into a racing stable and noticed the size, build, and substance of the horses could hardlv wish for anything better in those resDects. The fact was that greater pains were taken in the present day to force on a young horse. But there was one immediate test, and that had been mentioned by his hon. friend. If the breed had deteriorated, foreigners would not come to England to buy our horses; but the complaint was that every year more and more people came from abroad to purchase horses in England. That was proof that the English horse was a good horse. We have now a lot of similar agitators preaching against the cruelty" of foxhunting, and if ever a Bill to suppress the good old sport be introduced into Parliament there would be a fine chance for Mr Chaplin to "guillotine" its promoters as effectually as Lord Palmerston and Gen. Peel did Mr P. Wyndham and his motion about the deteriora- tion of our racehorses. Amongst other questions in re- ference to the alleged cruelty" of breaking up a fox and extinguishing his life and his carcase almost as quickly as a flash of lightning, some fox-hunting M. P. would pro- bably ask what was proposed to be done with the foxes now in the coverts of our hunting countries? Whether they must be kept to breed from, and pampered with the game that supplies the London and other markets, or must the edict go forth to every gamekeeper in the kingdom to shoot, trap, and poison every fox found in their preserves or elsewhere, and thus set in motion the most cruel and horrible means of death to which the fox is now subjected by a class of people who have not the skill to ride nor the courage to hunt. When a fox is found in covert he has a chance afforded him to save his life by flight, aided by his natural cunning, and if he be fairly run into his fate is far more quickly sealed than when caught by the leg in a trap, or when he crawls away to his covert to linger and die of poison. Yet many years of such atrocious cruelty to the fox would be the consequence of any legislation that would put an end to hunting, and to the manly and healthy pleasure afforded in a ride to hounds until they break up their quarry in the open, or he fairly beats them in a run to ground. THE INTERNATIONAL WRESTLING.âThis match came off on Thursday and Friday week, at the Agricultural Hall, in the presence of a vast concourse of persons. The competitors were M. Bonnet le Bceuf, of Gascoigne, and M. Dubois, of Paris, who represented France, and Wright, of Westmorland, and Jameson, of Cumberland, who represented Old England. The conditions were to wrestle two falls each in the French and English styles; and should both win in their own they were to toss for the final style in which the contest should be decided. The French $ T athletes were much heavier men than their opponents, while the latter had the advantage on the side of youth. Wright and Le Boeuf were the first pair, who contested m the English style, and the Westmorland soon brought the Frenchman to the ground i l ⢠9 f v ? Si.1 c'l.f. r J >;⢠;j,

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BARMQUTH JUNCTION.

THE FESTINIOG RAILWAY.

THE MARRIAGE OF MISS EDWARDS…

ROTTEN EGGS AND THE ADDRESS…

REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORN…

-4. LLANDDERFEL.

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