Hide Articles List

14 articles on this Page

SHOCKING ACCIDENT ON THE RAILWAY.

RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL.

I I PARISH COUNCIL.

News
Cite
Share

PARISH COUNCIL. A meeting of this Parish Council was held at a quarter to eight on Monday night. The members present were Mr. Conwy Bell (chair- man), Rev. B. Evans (vice chairman), Messrs. R. C. Enyon, John Roberts, Edward Evans, S. Corey, Robert Evans, W. Roach, and William Jones (acting clerk). The agenda included an item in which more than ordinary local public interest is centredâthe appointment of assis- tant overseer, inasmuch as the officer to be superseded has set up a claim for compensation. Consequent upon the interest taken in this particular matter, there was a full representa tion of the local and district press, despite the lateness of the hour of meeting, the distance from headquarters, and the inclemency of the .L weather. But the Council, in its superior wis- dom, resolved upon dealing with the subject in committee, and the reporters perforce had to be content with a very common-place pro- ceeding. THE GLANFFYDDION FOOTPATH. The Clerk read abetter from Mr. Charles Grimsley, clerk to the Rural District Council of St. Asaph, intimating that a Committee had been appointed to inspect and report on Glan- ffyddion footpath. Mr. R. C. Enyon said that he, the Vice- chairman, and the Clerk met the committee of the District Council on the locus in quo. They walked over the path, and the visiting commit- tee agreed that it was in a very disgraceful state. Full notes were taken, and a promise to report to the next District Council meeting made. TANYREGLWYS STILE.-SOMETHING BETTER THAN A 'KNIFE AND FORK GATE' WANTED. A sub-committee appointed with power to act to consider the state of the Tanyreglwys stile, at their first meeting, recommended that the present stile be taken down, and an oak gate with three oak posts in the form of kitch catch' be substituted. Tenders were invited for the erection of the gate, but none were forthcoming. Another meeting of the commit- tee was held on the 23rd of January, when it was resolved that tenders be invited for a gate on the same specification as those previously adopted, with the exception that a curved wall six inches wide should be substituted for the three oak posts. The Clerk said that he had in accordance with instructions invited Mr. William Parry to tender for the work, but up to then he had not received any reply. The Chairman said they must have the per- mission of the landlord to erect a wall. Mr. John Roberts thought that that was all settled. There was a public footway at Tanyr- eglwys. The Chairman: There is a right of way it is true. But a right of way is a very different thing to monopolising a piece of land and build- ing on it. Mr. Robert Evans suggested that permission be asked for, and if they get it, the committee should ask for power to do the work. The Clerk said that power to act had been given to the committee. What they wanted was more money, and not more power. He did not think the work could be'done for fifty shillings, the sum the Committee had been tied down to, and that he thought was the reason why no tenders were forthcoming. The Chairman thought fifty shillings a very fair sum for the work. What price did they put on the gate for a start? Mr. Edward Evans: Twelve shilling, without the irons. 11 Mr. Bell: You are considerably above the mark. Mr. Evans: We don't want I k-nif e and fork' gates like you get from Cwm. We want a gate I that people can look at as well as go through. Mr. Bell: I dont know. The knife and fork' gates as you call them last us for 30 years. But if you want a swagger' gate you must pay accordingly. Eight shillings'^ is plenty for any wicket gate. Mr. E. Evans thought the trouble of the committee had been in vain. Why were they not told at first that the permission of the landlord was necessary before they could carry out the work. Mr. Bell said there was no talk of building a wall at that time. He did not think permission would be refused. What he wanted was to proceed on legal basis to avoid any trouble in the future. Mr. Roach: If the landlord will put a gate up there we will be satisfied. The Chairman: Yon ought to be (laughter). Mr. Roach It is strange that the permission w of the landlord should be wanted to remove a style that is in such a bad state. Eventually, it was resolved to ask the land- lord for permission to build the wall, and to allow the Council to expend £ 3 on the work in the event of permission being granted. The Council then resolved itself into com- mittee to consider the appointment of assistant overseer. '?'-=:

[No title]

-------..-SPEECHES BY MR.…

SIR COURTENAY BOYLE AND LORD…

PROPOSED NEW CHURCH AT COLWYN.

A COLWYN BAY SLANDER CASE.

'-./ CARNARVONSHIRE POLICE…

[No title]

ârÙ£nirtg.

A WELSH SCHOOL BOARD AND THE…

AMATEUR CONCERT.

COWLYD WATER BOARD.