Mr. PRYSE PRYSE'S SUMACH HOUNDS|1840-10-31|The Demetian Mirror - Welsh Newspapers Online
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Mr. PRYSE PRYSE'S SUMACH HOUNDS

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Mr. PRYSE PRYSE'S SUMACH HOUNDS Many of our readers are aware that in additon to the GOGERDDAN FOX HOUNDS, and a gallant pack of HARRIERS our worthy Representative Mr. Pryse Pryse, keeps a few couple of those decided enemies to Pole-Cats, Fidgets, Martins, and other vermin of a similar species, known as SUMACH HOUNDS. These hounds have during the last two or three weeks afforded some excellent sport in the neighbourhood of Aberystwith, and have killed lots of pole-cats and other such like destroyers of game. On Friday the 23rd instant, the gallant little pack (not exceeding seven couple) met at Llanbadarn bridge about half a mile from Aberystwith,; as soon as they had reached this spot, and close to a gate leading into a nursery Garden, they hit on the drag of a Pole-Cat by the road side, and hunted it along one side of the hedge nearly to the Vicarage Grounds distance about a mile. On returning, on the opposite side of the hedge, they killed a very large hedge-hog, which they tore to pieces immediately they then ran to the spot where they first hit upon the drag; here they were at fault for a few minutes, but they soon again hit it off and crossing the bridge ran along the south side of the river and then across several fields till they came nearly to the first mile-stone on the turn- pike road. They again made for the bridge, and running through a rick-yard on Mr. Evans's farm at Pen y bont they crossed the road within two hundred yards of the bridge, and ran up the side of the river, close to the water, for about half a mile. The hounds had over-run the spot where the varmint had gone to earth by nearly fifty yards; but, immediately on discovering their mistake, they cast back of their own accord, when a great favorite, OLD RANGER, marked the earth which the Pole Cat had taken, and which was about ten yards from the river side. They immediately commenced tearing away the earth, with the assistance of the huntsman and others, when another favorite, BELLMAN, was observed in the river tearing away at the bank side, and at this spot the pole-cat was dug out and killed, after show- ing an hour and a halfs' most excellent sport. The hounds were then laid on again, and after pro- ceeding a quarter of a mile up the Rheidol, hit upon another drag, and after having hunted it up and down the hill towards Nanteos for upwards of an hour, run him to earth in a field belonging to Mr. Roberts of Llanbadarn, under a large oak tree; and as he went into such a safe retreat, the huntsman resolved on leaving him for another day's sport. The hounds again went up the river side for the distance of half a mile, forded the river, and immediately after they had crossed the water, they hit upon the drag of another pole-cat, before the huntsman or any one else had time to get over; they hunted it across the Rhayader road into a large bog by a small cover near the Dolau farm, ran through the cover, across the Dolau farm, back again to the cover, and after hunting this drag for nearly an hour and a half he went to earth under a Sally tree. By this time a very large field of sportsmen had mustered digging was commenced under the tree, and continued about an hour the hounds now became so impetuous that to keep them quiet some of them were forced to foa coupled. After digging about 6 feet RANGER was set at liberty, and he instantly marked a spot where it was discovered the varmint after running about 4 feet in the earth, had returned nearly to the surface. A terrier was loosed and immediately seized his tail, another laid hold of one of his hind legs, and with the greatest difficulty these two brave little fellows suc- ceeded in dragging him out by main strength, when 119 he proved to be the largest and the strongest pole-cat that any of the field had ever remembered to have seen. Several gentlemen in the town have been prevented enjoying a bit of sport with these hounds owing to their being unacquainted with the days on which they go out.

NUPTIAL FESTIVITIES. -

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1840.