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SHAM FIGHT AT GIBRALTAR:

-----NEWS FROM RUSSIA.

: FRANCE.

THE SERVIAN SUCCESSION.

,..-;-THE IMPERIAL INSTITUTE.…

-_._-----DEATH OF A FRENCH…

----THE DROWNING OF SPANISH…

-----THE INDIAN BUDGET.

----'----.-------..--THE UNITED…

- GLAMORGAN COUNTY COUNCIL.

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GLAMORGAN COUNTY COUNCIL. MEETING AT PONTYPRIDD. CHAIRMAN'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. I IMPORTANT COUNTY BUSINESS. FUTURE MEETINGS AT PONTYPRIDD AND NEATH. The first statutory meeting of the Glamorgan County Council was held on Monday at the Town-hall, Pontypridd, which had been tastefully and conveniently arranged for the occasion. There was a large attendance of aldermen and council- lors, only two being absent, viz., Councillor C. J. N. Grey, (who is very ill), and the Earl of Dun- raven. The following is a LIST OF THOSE PRESENT: Sir Hussey Vivian, Bart, M.P., (in the chair); Alderman Thomas Williams, Gwaelodygarth (in tle vice-chair) County Aldeimen John Cory, the Rev Aaron Davies, Henry Naunton Davies, John Davies, David Davis, Frederick Lewis Davis, John Jones Griffiths, Rees Harries, Wil- liam Hunter, Gwilym Cristor James, Richard Jenkins, William Jenkins, Gwilym Jones, David Lewis, Sir William Thomas Lewis, Kt., John Talbot Dillwyn Llewelyn, William Morgan, Walter Herbert Morgan, Edward Plummer, Thomas Rees, Thomas Philip White County Councillors Henry Anthony, James Barrow, Walter Bell, Evan Evans Bevan, James Bryant, Henry Pendrill Charles, John Stuart Corbett, William Thompson Crawshay, Edward Rice Daniel, David Davies, David Price Davies, Evan Davies, Evan Naunton Davies, Thomas Davies, Edward Edwards, John Salisbury Edwards, Charles Evan-Thomas, David Evans, Evan Evans, Herbert Evans, Henry Oakden Fisher, Robert Forrest, Thomas Freeman, John Samuel Gibbon, Earnest Hall Hedley, Henry Hopkins, William Howells, Frank James, John Blandy Jenkins, Thomas Jenkins, David Jones, Oliver Henry Jones, Richard William Jones, Thomas Jones (Clydach), Thomas Jones (Porth), Henry Lewis, Henry Watkin Lewis, James Lewis, Rich- ard Lewis, Edward Pritchard Martin, Henry William Mathias, John Lacton Meggitt, John Newell Moore, Richard Morgan, Richard Morris, Edward John Parry, Thomas Penrice, John Powell, Rees Hopkin Rhys, James Roberts, William Sims, John Morgan Smith, William Peddie Struve, David Thomas (Ystalyfera), David Thomas (Pentre), John Edwards Vaughan, Arthur Pendarves Vivian, John Williams, John Henry Williams, William Williams (Morriston), William Williams (Tonypandy), and Frank Cory Yeo, together with the clerk of the council (Mr T. Mansel Franklen); and his assistant (Mr Roderick.) THE LATE MR JOHN BRIGHT. The President at the outset said that perhaps it would be agreeable to the members of the council before they commenced their regular business to express the deep feelings of sorrow they entertained for the loss of one of the noblest and greatest statesmen that the country had ever seen. (Hear, hear.) The late Mr John Bright was so devoted to the good of his country and people that he could not help feeling it would be most fitting that a meeting of that councilâthat great body which would in future represent the countyâshould take some notice and pass a vote of condolence with the relatives of the deceased statesman. (Hear, hear.) He would, therefore, move a vote expressing their condolence with Mr Bright's family and their deep sorrow for the loss that England had sustained t-lie death of one of her brightest ornaments. (Hear, hear.) Councillor A. Pendarves Vivian seconded. He supposed that the task had devolved upon him because he had for many years sat in Parliament with Mr Bright. He had during that time never gone into a different lobbly from Mr Bright, who was not only a most brilliant and convincing orator, but one of the most conscientious and straightforward politicians who ever lived. (Hear, hear.) He felt confident that in future genera- tions the name of John Bright, would he carried down as a household word amongst politicians, and as representing,not oily the brilliant oratory, but the John Bullism in politics which never 'eared one side or the other, but gave the vote for that which lie thought conscientiously to be the right one. (Hear, hear.) The vote was agreed to. THE PRESIDENT'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS. The President thought they would all feel that it was fitting upen the occasion that he should address a few remarks to them. That was no ordinary meeting. TlieW met there that day for the first time as the county council of Glamorgan -the great governing body of the county, now endowed with the full powers which had been conferred upon the council by the Local Govern- ment Act. Not only was that the appointed day upon which they commenced their labour, but it was also the day upon which the ancient institu- tion which had hitherto governed the county ceased to exist. The court of quarter sessions, so far as the county work was concerned, would from that day cease to exist as regarded civil business. He, therefore,thought it fitting that he, as one of the oldest magistratesâhe was a magis" trate of forty years' standing, and had taken a somewhat active part in the county businessâ should on that occasion say that he thought they ought to express their opinion that the business of the county had been conducted by the magis- trates in quarter sessions in a way which reflected high honour upon them. (Hear, hear.) He need scarcely say that during the long JJSfiod he 1 had sai in quarter sessions he had iieve- known one single instance of a duty not well perforned nor had he known a single instance in which the strict path of honour and integrity had been devi- ated from in the slightest. The quarter sessions was not a representative body, it was true,but it was a body composed of gentlemen who felt the very g.eat a responsibility devolving upon them, and tr.ey devoted time ftiul energy to their duties, which he li«d no habitation in saying they dis- cliavged in tlw most perfect and honourable man- ner. They had left behind them a record which w&3 As free from tailit of any kind as the record of any public body which ever existed, and he Could only say that lie, trusted that the council which was that day inaugurated would be able in future to conduct the business of the county in as complete and perfect a manner as it had been conducted hitherto by the magistrates. They, as the justices' successors, undertook honourableamd important duties and heavy responsililities^ but lie knew that they did so with a full desire to dis- charge those important duties to the best of their abil.ty. He looked forward to their discharging their duty in such a manner a* to 'merit greater powers being conceded themâ(hear, hear)âand to the time when that council, in conjunction witli the councils of the other We'sh counties, would be the actual governing body to deal with the governing institutions of the Principality. It be- hoved them, therefore, to so arrange their instu- tion as to make it as cjnyxete as possible. To- day they had to agree upon standing orders, and it wa, upon the standing orders tiiatthj regularity and order of their debates would depend. They m ist so arrange, and he hoped that they had so proposed to arrange, them that they would,ensure th3 due deliberation of all questions which were submitted to them, and up! ell the dignity of the institution. The organising committee had gone into them lalrly. Standing orders bad been pre- pared by their excellent clerk, in conjunction with himself (the chairman), and were afterwards sub- milted to tlC stai ding orders committee, who had carefu 1/ gone into them, and proposed cer- tain amendments and additions which he thought would have the effect of causing their delibera- tions to be even better conducted. He felt con- fident that the council would adopt 'n the main th* sug estions m^de, and that they would be actuated by the same desire to do good work, and .til the txpei-d.ture cf as little time as posssible for useless speeeh-making as bad influenced the committee. As to the committees, he had felt a difficulty in determining how they would be foi med, because being a new body, the members were, to a great extent, unknown to each other. There were two courses upen to them. They nrght have adopted, as in the House of Commons, a cororviL-e? of selection, C) 11pOfOO of,tre-rbJ!"s of the council from the various districts who might have suggested names, or they might have adopted the course which" they adopted 01 asking the aldermen and councillors to suggest the most fitting names for the committees. It was a sys- tem which had already worked well, and he thought this was calculated to work well in future, Upon the finance committee great res- ponsibility would rest. One of their chief func- tions was to save as far as possible the pockets of the ratepayers. The finance committee would occupy the position which the treasury occupied in Parliament. If a dashing young naval lord desired to spend 10, 20, 30, or 40 millions of pounds upon great ships,then the treasury stepped in, and said you must moderate your views, because we have to meet the expenditure in facing I the country, and, therefore, you must cut your coat according to our cloth." He hoped the finance committee would exercise their functions over the deliberations of the council in some such manner as that, and if there was a tendency to spend rather too much money, that the finance committee would step in and sayâ"gentlemen, you really must moderate your views." (Laughter and applause.) They would have a large share from the imperial taxes, but let them not be dealt w ith in a light manner, but let them use those funds wisely for the purpose of relieving the bur- dens of the ratepayers of this county. (Applause.) The rates were already heavy, and let them re- duce them as much as possible. The agricultur- ists were already overburdened with bad times; manufacturers found the rates of the county pressed heavily upon their resources, and it be- hoved the council as far as possible to reduce their burdens, and enable them to compete with other countries and foreign places in the production of the articles they manufacture. (Hear, hear.) Now they had power to borrow money, but he thought the less they borrowed the better- (laughter and- hear, hear,)-and he hoped this power would be very sparingly used. Then they had a local government committee, which would really be the executive committee of the council. He himself had suggested calling that committee the local government" committee, because he thought it more clearly suited the nature of the duties which would devolve upon the committee, namely the carrying out of the general powers ,I granted them by the Local Government Act. Some councils had called that committee the general purposes committee. He thought that was a very weak word, and he considered the other very much stronger and clearer. Many questions of vital importance would be entrusted to them, such as the fixing of boundaries and questions of that nature he trusted would be ap- proached with thoroughly unprejudiced judicial minds. They must never allow any local pre- judice of any kind to sway them from doing what was right in all cases. Then they came to the selection of officers. Now, let them always endea- vour to select the best man for each post, and endeavour to put the right man in the right place." Let there be no favouritism or nepotism to interfere with their choosing the very best man for each particular office. He thought the council up to this time had worked well, and he was sure that it would in future also work well in its deliberations. They must remember, and he was sure they would, that each man had his in- dividual opinion, and yet they must endeavour to work together, bearing in mind that each might be thoroughly canscientious in his views although he might be opposed to those held by others. Let them not place themselves in the position of the juryman who left the room finding fault with his fellow-jurors, and saying that he never saw eleven such obstinate men in his life. (Laughter and applause.) Let them give away to the decision of the majority. He was sorry to say that in Parlia- ment there was too much questioning the de- cisions of the majority. He would for one mom- ent ask to be allowed to express his personal thanks for the honour of electing him as their chairman. He could assure them that he felt it very deeply. He had now served this county for a large number of years as well as he could. He had been for 28 years and upwards a member for the county, and four years as member for the district of Swansea, making it 32 years, and he accepted his election as a proof that his public conduct had merited their approval. He had felt that whatever he knew of public life it was only due to the-'constitunencies of this county that lie should render any services that he could in organising and giving a good start to the great council of the county. It was his business to do so, and he had not hesitated, therefore, to under- take this burden which was entailed upon him by their good feeling; In conclusion, he desired that every success might attend this great institu- tion, and that it might enlarge the sphere of its usefulness until it embraced the local interests of the whole Welsh nation. (Applause.) STANDING ORDERS. The suggestions emanating from the standing orders committee, which met at Cardiff on March 14th, then came before the council for considera- tion. These were mostly of a routine character. It was decided that the statutory quarterly meet- ings should be held on the third Thursday in January, April, and July, and the November meeting on the 7tli, if not a Sunday, when it should be on the 8tli. Reporters and the public will be admitted to these meetings, and special meetings may be summoned by the chairman. The committees will consist of finance, local I government, roads and bridges, cattle diseases, county roads, fisheries, and pollution of rivers committees, consisting of 25) members each, also a committee of visitors of the county lunatic asylums. After some discussion it wag decided that Cardiff should have nine members, Swansea three, and the county twenty-four, 1 THE "WESTERN MAIL' AND SUNDAY CLOSING. Councillor Freeman (Swansea) incidentally suggested that fifteen minutes was not sufficiently "I long for the mover of a resolution to speak. (Laughter.) Well, if he wanted to move a re- solution on Sunday Closing, for instance, he might not have to make a speech of fifteen minutes' duration to convince that meeting, but to convince Lord Aberdare and the Western Mail he might have to speak for half an hour. ("Oh, oh," and laughter.) The matter was not pursued. THE COST OF THE RECfiXl' ELECTIONS A PROTEST FROM PONTYPRIDD. In connexion with a paragraph contained in the report of the organising committee authoris- ing the payment of certain charges made by returning officers for the election of county councillors in Glamorganshire, a discussion arose on the general nature of these charges. Councillor Hopkins, Pontypridd said there was a very strong feeling exisiting in this district and others upon the question of returning officer's charges in connection with the recent county council elections. He hoped the committee ap- pointed to examine those claims would look very carefully into them with a view to bringing them down within reasonable limits, for it was strongly felt that something should be done in order that .1 elections might be conducted more economically. (Hear, hear.) I Councillor H. P. Charles (Neath) moved that the clerk of the council should be instructed to forthwith take the necessary steps to secure the taxation of the returning officers' costs relating to the county council election. (Hear, hear.) Alderman Thomas Williams, vice-chairman, seconded the resolution. He mentioned the pay- ment of four guineas each to the deputy returning (fficers as an instance in which very extravagant charges were made. Councillor J. Powell said this was an enor- mous tax on the people, and was a scandal and a shame. Councillor D. Davies (Glebeland), who supported the amendment, said that even if these were statu- tory charges, it was their duty, as a county council, to have them altered. In his own division it was regarded as a scandalous thing that the members of one family should be continually filling these places. At the last bye-election, when Mr Frank Jone3 was returned, the same set were engaged, and no one else had a chance of getting the employment. Some of them did nothing else all the year round, and indeed they had no need to do anything else. (Laughter). He intended no reflection on the returning officer for the Merthyr School Board, or any others, but he thought it was time the whole matter received revision. The resolution was adopted unanimously. TAKING WOBK FROM THE MAGISTRATES. The organising committee recommended that the cattle diseases committee be allowed to decide npon the method of working the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Acts, with power to appoint upon the method of working the Contagious Diseases (Animals) Acts, with power to appoint the magistrates in petty sessions as sub-oom- mittees if they thought fit.âThis was opposed by [ several memoers, and, on the motion of Mr J. Powell, it was resolved that the words magis- I trates in petty sessions" be omitted, and the fol- lowing substituted:â" The local board or rural sanitary authority or any other elected body qualified by Act of Parliament." The organising committee recommended that the working of the Explosives Act and the governing the licensing of theatres be referred to the local government committee, with power to appoint the magistrates in petty sessions as sub-committees if they thought proper, but on the motion of Mr J. Powell a similar amendment to that made in the previous recommendation was adopted. THE FORMATION OF COMMITTEES: ARE THE NAMES "TO BE OR NOT TO BE READ? It having been incidentally suggessted that the finance committee should consider certain mat- ters during the luncheon hour, and report on the re-assembling of the council, a proposal was made that committees be immediately appointed, this not having been previously done. The Clerk was reading the list of names sub- mitted by the selection committee, when Alderman W. H. Morgan suggested that the list be taken as read. The hint was not immediately acted upon, and the clerk went on with his task, whereupon Councillor H. Hopkins, Pontypridd, said that the list handed in to the clerk followed the precedent laid down for the guidance of the council at Neath, and speaking as chairman of the meeting held by the East Glamorgan section, he said the meeting was in every way a satisfactory one, and the list handed in on its benalf by Alderman Morgan had been agreed to. The same thing had been done elsewhere, and he urged the acceptance of the list as arranged. Councillor Rhys, Aberdare, would support Mr Hopkins' view as to accepting the list in its entirety, but would like to have it read. (Laughter.) After some further conversation, the chairman {rat the question to the meeting, when there was a arge majority in favour of taking the list as read. Councillor Rhys (warmly) I never heard a more scandalous thing in my life. (Great Laughter.) The council then adjourned for luncheon. A report of the proceedings at the luncheon appears in another column. On the reassembling of the council, the business was immediately resumed. THE FINANCE COMMITTEE. On resuming, the finance committee reported that they had appointed Mr J. T. D. Llewelyn chairman, and recommended that certain sums be placed to the credit of the roads, police, election, and loans accounts. The report was adopted. Amongst the local speakers who took part in the discussion on the standing orders and com: mittees were Councillors W. Williams, Tony- pandy; R. Morris, Pentre; Rev. J. Salisbury Edwards, Treorky; &c. ;J THF FIRST RATE. r On the motion of Mr. Thomas Williams, it was decided to levy a rate of 2d. in the £ to meet the expenditure for the half year, to be made payable in June. THE PLACE OF MEETING :âSPEECHES BY LOCAL MEMBERS. Alderman Hunter, of Neath, proposed that Pontypridd and Neath be the towns at which the meetings be held alternately, and that the next meeting be held at Neath. Councillor T. Penrice seconded. Mr W. T. Crawshay moved that Neath and Cardiff be the places at which the meetings be held alternately and that the next meeting be held at Neath. Councillor James Lewis, Aberdare, seconded, and thought that it would be for the convenience of the greater part of the county that the meetings be held at Cardiff rather than at Pontypridd. Alderman W. H. Morgan, Pontypridd,supportec1 the resolution, and said there was a great feeling amongst the electors against going outside the county, and he contended that it was not paying proper respect to the county to say that there was not a town within the county which was able to accommodate the County Council. He had great respect for Cardiff,and also for public convenience, but in a matter of this kind they must put up with some amount of inconvenience. He should ask what would be thought if a town council, or a corporation suggested going out of their own town for a place of meeting. (Hear, hear.) Why, the ratepayers would immediately be up in arms. He contended that the arguments applied with equal force to holding the County Council meetings outside the limits of the county proper. Cardiff was as much outside the county as was the borough of Newport. (Hear, hear). Alderman A. Davies, Pontlottyn, also supported the motion on the same ground. Councillor Frank James, MerthyrâPerma- nently, or for one year ? VoicesâFor one year. Other VoicesâPerma- nently. Councillor R. H. Rhys, Aberdare, agreed that it should be for one year. He did not object to Pontypridd and Neath being the places at which I to hold the meetings, and he coincided with Alderman Morgan in his objection to the Council going outside the county for a meeting place. It r was a Sentiment, perhaps, but that W&.3 how he felt. (Hear, hear, and cries of Vote.") Councillor H. Hopkins, Pontypridd, Said it was not merely sentiment, tut looking at it from a practical point of view, they should decide it on the position of the town as compared with others outside Cardiff, for Cardiff itself was outside this county, and he contended that inasmuch as Pontypridd was nearer to a larger number of Aldermen and Councillors than any other place, it should have the preference. (Cries of u Vote, vote.") The Chairman said the question was that the towns of Pontypridd and Neath should be taken alternately for the meetings of this Council, since which it had been moved that Pontypridd should be omitted, and the word Cardiff inserted. He now put it to the meeting, and declared that the ayes had it in favour of the original motion. The question was again asked whether it was understood that it was to be for one year, and the Chairman said he had omitted to put it in that way, but he would now ask them to signify, and on the ayes being shouted he declared that to be carried. ROADS COMMITTEE. Councillor Blandy Jenkins, as chairman of the present connty roads board, proposed that the roads committee should meet on Saturday, the 26th inst, at 12.30, at the offices of the clerk. This was agreed to. A motion was proposed that the Council now adjourn, The Vice-chairman (Alderman Thomas Williams) said they had a lot of business to go through, and he should propose that an amend- ment that the Council proceed with the business of the meeting. Councillor David Davies, Glebeland, seconded, but the amendment was lost, and the Council then adjourned. THE APPOINTMEMT OF CAPTAIN LINDSAY. The following notices of motion stood on the agenda paper, but were not reached in time for discussion:â That in the opinion of this council, the superin- tendent of police for Merthyr should have been elected from the police force of the county.â County Alderman Gwilym Jcnes. That, in the opinion of this council, the recent appoinf-nent by Captain Lindsay of his son as super ntsndent of county constabulary for the Merthyr Dmsion-jast-on the eve of the council having a joint power in such appointments, is an indignity to the council, an injustice to those police officers who by long and faithful service nave a claim for promotion, and the exoercise of a parental power unjust in principle, and inimical to the public interests. That this council adopt such measures as maybe considered desirable,with a view to having such appointment canceHed.- t Cou ty Councillor David Davies.

THE LUNCHEON. .-,- -'

ILLUSTRATIVE LECTURE AT TREHERBERT.

PONTYPRIDD LOCAL BOARD TRIENNIAL…

IR ALFRED THJMIS, M.P., ON…

—' • I ' SAD FATALITY…

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