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PONTYPRIDD POLICE COURT.

PENTRE POLICE COURT.

[No title]

THE CHEMISTRY OF EXPLOSIONS.

FRIGHTFUL SUICIDE IN MON-MOUTHSHIRE.

•MQDfir CYMEEIG.' l I

AT OLYGYDD Y'PONTYPRIDD CHRONICLE"

AT OLYGYDDý'lbNTYPRIDD CHRONICLE.'I

THE COlN^PUTIONALISTS OF EAST…

A BRIEF §)J0!TRN IN CORNWALL.

DISTRICT INTELLIGENCE.

PONTYPRIDD BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

IINSTRUCTIONS TO SIR H. ROBINSON.

»..1J. A PLEA FOR THE BOERS.

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» ..1J. A PLEA FOR THE BOERS. Mr. Henry Richard, M.P., writes to a contempo* rary :âI trust there are not many of our country men who will look upon the miserable conflict into which we have entered with the Boers of the TnDt- vaal with any other feelings than those of regret and disgust. The annexation of the territory of the Republic was the arbitrary act of one omcial dressed in a little brief authority, pni was brought about in open defiance of the instructions sent him from the Colonial Office. Sir "fheophilns Shep* stone was only commissioned to take temporary possession of part of the Transvaal, and that ex- pressly on the condition that the inhabitants, or the Legislature, signified their desire to become subjects of the Queen, instead of which he took absolute pot* session of the whole country against the wishes both of the people and the Volksraad, who declined even to deliberate on his proposal for the surrendet of their independence. The main plea urged in justi- fication of this high-handed course was thisâthat the Boers were in danger of becoming involved in war with the Zulus, and that some contingent peril might arise from that to our colony of Natal. But we utterly stultified that plea; for almost immec diately after the annexation we began an aggrer sive and unprovoked war upon the Zulus ourselves. It is greatly to be regretted that the present Govern- ment, when it came into office, had not the courage to do in South Africa what they did in Afgl anistan-that is, boldly reverse the policy of their predecessors. Mr.Gladstone did not scruple to brand the annexation as both impolitic and unjust. Why, then, adopt and stand by a proceeding that could be so characterised t It is very well to talk of the necessity for continuity in our policy. But surely there ought to be no continuity of acknowledged folly and wickedness. It ought not to be forgotten at this time that the entire European population of South Africa amounts to 340,000 s'nls. Of this number only 120,000 are English, the rest being Dutchmen, or of Dutch descent. That these latter strongly sympathise with their kinsmen of the Transvaal is evident from the remarkable ad- dress to Mr. Gladstone from the Dutch in the Cape Colony, transmitted through Mr. Courtney, M.P., interceding for the Boers and entreating the Prime Minister to restore their independence. The danger is therefore that, by attempting to crush the latter, we should alienate the loyalty of a large body of our fellow subjects throughout the South African colonies. No one can question our g>wer to suppress the Boers of the Transvaal, ut what possible advantage, or glory, can come from such an exploit ? Why should we rob these people of their inaependence ? It is impossible that men like Mr. Gladstone and Mr. Brignt can have any sympathy with such a polioy. Let there be only a distinct expression of public opinion, and we may venture to hope that such instructions will be sent out to South Africa as shall stop further bloodshed by some arrangement which wul practically restore to these people their country and their independence. Alfred Ashley Vanghton, 58, a gentleman of good mections, was brought up at the Warwickshire u-ter session on a charge of attempting to commit cide. He had made several previous attempts, and dence having been adduced to prove that he was an oitual drunkard, he was dealt with under the Aituai Drunkards Act of 1879. The court com- tted him to prison for a month, and ordered him be detained in a retreat for three years. 3ir Theodore Martin has postponed his address aa )rd Rector of St. Andrew's University till the be- ining of next session. He will probably then be a position to refer more definitely to the prospects the university in connection with recent important ovements affecting Its interests. Baron Henry de Worms intends to aek the Secre- y for War, in the House of Commons, whether, in w of the very unsatisfactory nature of the last re- t of the Commissioners of the Royal Patriotio nd, he will appoint a committee to investigate d report upon the financial and general aaminiatra- n of the fund, and the manner in which the Royal triotic Schools at Wandsworth are conducted. If does not intend to appoint such committee, whether will state what steps, if any, he proposes to take to er to remedy the present state of affairs. Christ Church, Doncaster, has been entered by thieves, who abstracted the contents of two or three free gift boxes.which had not been cleared since Beetee. William Ainsworth, 27, employed at the Memy Hotel, Runcorn, has been charged with abducting the daughter of Mr. Thomas Blease, of the Royal Hotet The two hostelries are only a few yards apartt and the prisoner formed an intimacy of a tender charact9 with Mim Blease, who is only 16 years of age next birthday, and they went off to--other the young lady leaving a letter stating that she had gone to Iilv«v pool. Her parentB found that Ainsworth had also left th« town, and suspected what had happened, and, with the aid of the police, were able to trace the young couple to Warrington, meeting them justeS they were proceeding to church to be married. Thi prisoner was remanded, but admitted to bail.

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