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Echoes from the Welsh Papers.

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Echoes from the Welsh Papers. By BRYTHON. Several of our national newspapers in their reviews of the past year look upon it as having been a gloomy period. A jolly place in times of old, said he, but something ails it now." However as the Bilver lining of the cloud cheers us a little, let us hope, with them, that better times have dawned. As the Gettedl points out, some, but not many, eminent men have gone to that tourne whence no traveller returnsâAp Pychau, as one of the leaders of the nation; Gwyddno, the indefati- gable and popular Editor of the Dynjarwr; Mr T. J. Hughes, Liverpool, the well-known vocalist, and Mr W. W. E. Wynne, the historian. Notwithstanding the fact that some people were offended with Mr Osborne Morgan for not pressing his Burials Bill further, one of the leading, if not the principal, Nonconformist news- papesr, Y Faner, in one of a series of articles on "Welsh M.P.'s," speaks very highly of him. It says: There is no need to say who he is, for the name of George Osborne Morgan is a household word throughout North and South Wales, if not the whole kingdom. We are bound, as a nation, to be proud of, such a man. During the past twelve years his voice has been raised against oppression and tyranny everywhere, and for the right at home and abroad. His name, too, will be handed down in history to ages to come in con- nection with the Burials Measure. The grievance under which w as Nonconformists, have suffered has been for ever removed. Should Wales ever again be placed under the yoke of a Tory Govern- ment, we feel confident that that, even though it be the most extreme Tory that ever existed, will not dare erase from the statute-books, the law, passed last year, which has opened the church- yards to Nonconformists as to Churchmen." In its article on the Queen's Speech, the Tyst is glad to find that the honour of presenting the Queen's Speech was accorded to Mr Stuart Rendel, member for Montgomery. It was an honour to Wales also. The true worth and ability of the hon. member for Radnorshire the people generally have not yet found out. He is one of the most intelligent, enlightened and genial men in the House of Commons to-day. Speaking of the work of the coming session, the same journal remarks that it is likely to be a stormy one, and that it is diiicult to see what may happen; but if the Liberals of Wales, England, and Scotland are united, they can carry their views to triumph notwithstanding the machinations of Tories and Parnellites; and in the name of the comfort, the peace and the prosperity of our country, we hope it will be so." r GeneiU in commenting on the conduct of Mr Samuel I'l.iusotl in sending to the Penygraig Ex- Fund, t'o 926 cheque he had received from tba editor of the Nineteenth. Century, for his article on explosions in coal mines, says: Mr Plimsoll has carved for himself an indelible name as tht Seaman's Friend,' and the act we have m< ill !⢠ned suggests that he is about to make for iiiiuseif a position as the friend and patron of another class of the sons of toilâour colliers." The Permanent Relief Fund is dealt with at some length in the columns of the Qwladgarwr by Mr D. Morgan, of Mountain Ash, one of the workmen's representatives on the Sliding scale Committee. Mr Morgan is of opinion that the scheme laid before the n i n by the employers savours too much of pal liality to the masters. They are to be allowed to become members, and he think they would, owing to that, be very likely to work them- selves to a majority on the Board of Management- Therefore, lie advises them to keep in order to ime pri ve their works, the 20 per cent, which they ar. 80 anxious to give towards a fund.â Without exactly advocating the views expressed by Mi Morgan, I must say that I admire his pluck, as a niin who has the courage of his conviotions. Tho Hetief Fund would undoubtedly benefit the men if it were founded on a sound basis, but so long as a suspicion lurks that it may lead to any kind of subjugation of the employed to employers in the manner indicated, they are right in pointing these matters out And, though they suffer much by the terrible calamities which periodically occur in these Valleys, when any attempt at getting over them is made, the workmen exclaim My voice is still for war. God's can a ltoman senate long debate Which of the two to choose, slavery or death ?" Now that so much attention is centred upon the question of the prevention of accidents, and the consequent saving of life in coal mines, it is interes- ting to notice that local men are to the fore with schemes and projects. Mr Thomas Jones, of Hafod, Ynyshir and Navigation collieries, who is a prac- tical man, has actually laid his project before high authorities, and according to the Gwladgarwr, Mr Thomas Davies, mining engineer, of Groeswen, or, in other words, our old friend, Eos Rhondda, is busy perfecting a scheme of his own with the same object. There is in F Genedl a letter on the manage- .ment of Sabbath Schools, in which the writer advocates a quarterly inspection of the classes, and the appointment of a competent inspector to examine the whole school at the end of a given term. Undoubtedly a good plan and one that is already in operation at some schools in Pontypridd and neighbourhood.

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