Hide Articles List

22 articles on this Page

Advertising

Family Notices

Advertising

TO OUR READERS.

Echoes from the Welsh Papers.

WALK AND TALK.

Advertising

LANCASHIRE COLLI RS AND THE…

VEHICULAR ACCIDENT X PONTYPRIDD.

NODION CYMEEIG.

MR. McDONALD, M.P., ON THE…

MARKET.

PENTRE POLICE COURT. -

PONTYPRIDD POLICE COURT.

PONTYPRIDD RURAL SANITARY…

PONTYPRIDD COUITTT COURT.

THE PLOTS AGAINST THE CZAR.

News
Cite
Share

THE PLOTS AGAINST THE CZAR. A Birmingham oorrespondent telegraphs that a working clockmaker named Hutchinson, resident in that town, has communicated with the Russian Embassy in London with respect to an alleged nlot to aonstruct infernal machines in thts country for Nihilist purposes. He states that in April, 1879, he was in London en business, and in a restau- rant in Cheapside he met with two strangers, with whom he entered into conversation. One of the men was a Russian, and the other a German. The same evening, in the coune of some more conversation, Hutchinson happened to state that he was a Birmingham clock-maker, and shewed the men some of his patterns. The men then asked him If he could make all sorts of clockwork and work to designs, and on an affirmative reply being given the strangers produced some rough de- â¢lgrns, and from their explanation of them Hut- chinson had no hesitation in concluding that they were for a destructive purpose. One infernal machine had to be arranged so that it could he fixed under the ground a little way, and from where the crutch was fixed over the pendulum wire a contrivance was to be constructed by which a small lead pipe could be attached, and through the pipe a wire had to be carried. A second machine was to be arranged with sharp hooks to drive it into the bottom of a railway carriage, the clockwork movement being made to explode the charge at any time from one minute to 48 or more hours. A third machine was to be more simple, having to be so constructed that it could be put under a garden walk or any other path. Another was a dynamite bomb to be affixed, und ;r the seat of a private carriage. The last machine sketched out by tlje conspirators was the most diabolical of all. It was to be of miniature size, so that it might be easily placed within a bouquet. Hutchinson suspects the object of the men was to be present at some demonstration in honour of the Czar, and throw the bouquet containing the deadly charge at the Royal carriage. The stranger seemed particularly anxious that Hutchinson should enter Into an agreement there and then tor the comple- tion of the articles, but he asked time to consider, and at a second Interview the foreigners brought an agreement for Hutchinson to sign, en- joining the strictest secrecy on penalty of death and promising £100 on the completion of the work. Hutchinson, however, told the men he had made up his mind not to undertake the work. The men had previously told him of an attempt which would â hortly*be made to wreck the Royal train on the Moscow journey, and, failing in that attempt, they would blow up the Winter Palace. The foreigners were greatly exasperated when he expressed his final determination not to be mixed up in any such diabolical business, and one of them threatened to murder him for deceiving them. An attaché of the Russian Embassy has since had several interviewa with Hutchinson.

[No title]

THE NEW PAPER.

MR. THOMAS WILLIAMS' TESTIMONIAL.

INVESTMENT OF GEOK TEPE.

[No title]